Intelligent Design The Future show

Intelligent Design The Future

Summary: The ID The Future (IDTF) podcast carries on Discovery Institute's mission of exploring the issues central to evolution and intelligent design. IDTF is a short podcast providing you with the most current news and views on evolution and ID. IDTF delivers brief interviews with key scientists and scholars developing the theory of ID, as well as insightful commentary from Discovery Institute senior fellows and staff on the scientific, educational and legal aspects of the debate.

Podcasts:

 Michael Behe on COVID-19 and ‘Why Are There Viruses, Anyway?’ | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 932

On this episode of ID the Future, host Andrew McDiarmid and biochemist Michael Behe discuss the pandemic coronavirus known as COVID-19. The two move through a series of questions, some straightforward, others more speculative. What is a virus and where did this one come from? Why is it so much worse than other coronavirus strains? What sort of evolution is involved here? Does the human species have any ancient, shared genetic relationship with viruses? And why are there viruses in the first place?

 Jay Richards on When to Doubt the Scientific ‘Consensus’ | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 856

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, hear Jay Richards’ talk given at a Washington D.C. event entitled “March for Science or March for Scientism? Understanding the Real Threats to Science in America.” The event was hosted by Discovery Institute and the Heritage Foundation. Listen in as he discusses the issue of consensus in science, and when to doubt such a consensus.

 Durston on Experimental, Inferential, and Fantasy Science--Pt. 2 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1186

On this episode of ID the Future, biophysicist and philosopher Kirk Durston continue their discussion of three types of science--(1) experimental science, (2) inferential science, and (3) fantasy science. In this second of three episodes, Durston recaps the three types but focuses on inferential science. He explains how it involves, in the historical sciences, abductive reasoning (inference to the best explanation), and he explains how such reasoning can be used as we consider the best explanation for the origin of biological information, and in such a way that it is rooted in observation.

 Durston on Experimental, Inferential, and Fantasy Science--Pt. 1 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1036

On this episode of ID the Future, biophysicist and philosopher Kirk Durston discusses his recent article series about three types of science--(1) experimental science, which is generally very trustworthy, with some exceptions; (2) inferential science, which can be trustworthy but often takes huge leaps into the doubtable and dodgy; and (3) fantasy science, which is essentially science fiction masquerading as actual science. In this first of three episodes, Durston focuses on experimental science. Such science is, at its best, reproducible and verifiable. Durston says he has yet to find a true conflict between experimental, reproducible scientific observations and his religious faith. The contradictions he encountered were all between his faith and the inferences that some scientists were drawing from experimental science. Durston and host Andrew McDiarmid then move into a discussion of the reproducibility crisis in experimental science. As Durston explains, without a healthy scientific culture and the right incentives, experimental science can quickly fall into disrepair.

 Just the Facts? Michael Flannery on Charles Darwin and Materialism | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1339

On this classic episode of ID the Future, Brian Miller interviews Michael Flannery on how Darwin’s background conditioned him to materialism, and how this influence impacted his development of the theory of evolution. Listen in to learn more about Darwin’s experiences at the University of Edinburgh with the Plinian Society, and his interaction with prominent atheists Aveling and Büchner near the end of his life.

 Honoring Phillip Johnson Pt. 6: Emily Johnson, Stephen Meyer | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 988

On this episode of ID the Future, we present two final, moving talks in a series honoring the late Phillip E. Johnson, author of the hit book Darwin on Trial and affectionately known as the godfather of the Intelligent Design movement. These two eulogies were given at his memorial service in November. The first speaker is Emily Johnson, Phillip Johnson's daughter. The second is Stephen Meyer, director of the Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture.

 Michael Denton: Remarkable Coincidences in Photosynthesis | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 922

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, we listen in on a few minutes from a lecture given by CSC Senior Fellow Michael Denton. We've all heard of the importance of photosynthesis as an oxygen creating process. In this segment, Denton explains the "remarkable set of coincidences" which makes the creation of oxygen through photosynthesis possible. From the specific energy of visible light to the unique properties of water, this degree of improbability screams DESIGN.

 Paul Nelson on the 2020 Summer Seminars on Intelligent Design | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1128

On this episode of ID the Future, host Rob Crowther talks with Discovery Institute Senior Fellow and philosopher of science Paul Nelson about the upcoming Summer Seminars at the Discovery Institute in Seattle in July. In two overlapping tracks, these seminars provide nine days of intensive study on design in the natural sciences and in humanities and the social sciences, with the opportunity to interact with top scholars and other students. It’s “summer camp for nerds,” says Nelson, and the opportunity for upper-level undergrads, grad students, professors, and professionals to break free of the isolation they often experience in environments where design is kept off the table. Nelson discusses why he loves lecturing at the seminars every July, and what students can expect. There’s still time to apply for the 2020 seminars, through early March.

 Honoring Phillip Johnson Pt. 5: John Mark Reynolds | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 779

On this episode of ID the Future we hear John Mark Reynolds’ concluding comments at the November 2019 symposium in honor of the late Phillip E. Johnson. Reynolds is a Fellow with the Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture, president of the Constantine School in Houston, and a long-time friend of Phillip Johnson. Reynolds says he saw in Johnson a mind constant and relentless in the pursuit of truth, a man who refused to distort the truth to fit it into a materialist paradigm, and who passed along that mindset to as many as he could, for he knew there is no success without successors. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

 Honoring Phillip Johnson Pt. 4: Ann Gauger | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 904

On this episode of ID the Future, we hear biologist and Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Ann Gauger speaking at a gathering to honor the recently deceased Dr. Phillip Johnson, the Berkeley law professor known affectionately as the “godfather” of the intelligent design movement. Dr. Gauger tells of her journey of discovery, how she returned to a science career three times in her life, how she found her way into the ID movement, and how Johnson emboldened her to give free rein to a healthy scientific skepticism, one that has long had her pushing back against scientific materialism with a simple question: “Who says?” Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

 Gauger: Is It Easy to Get A New Protein? | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 924

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Ann Gauger discusses a central argument used by evolutionary biologists to say it’s simple to get new proteins. Listen in to learn more about nylonase, and whether it shows that purely natural processes can produce biological information.

 Paul Nelson Visits the Galapagos Islands, Pt. 3 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 920

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher of biology Paul Nelson wraps discussion of his recent visit to the Galapagos Islands, sharing lessons he learned there. He says Darwin was right to see natural history as crucial to understanding biology; but he was wrong in making it the be-all and end-all. Nelson then limns a picture of a day when scientists frankly concede the limits of evolution and the necessity of intelligent design in the history of life, and with the ID/evolution war behind them, can explore without distraction the fertile ground of integrating the aspects of evolutionary theory that actually work into a larger design framework.

 Paul Nelson Visits the Galapagos Islands, Pt. 2 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 809

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher of biology Paul Nelson continues his discussion with host Andrew McDiarmid about Nelson’s recent visit to the Galapagos Islands, made famous by Charles Darwin. Nelson explains how Darwin was right — partly. Darwin urged biologists to consider the history of a plant or animal, an idea that was much neglected in the work of his predecessors. As Darwin’s experience on the Galapagos showed, and as Nelson’s experience there echoed, history must be part of our explanation for how species and populations have become the way they are today. At the same time, there are demonstrated limits to evolutionary change, Nelson argues, and so natural history alone cannot be the entire explanation for the origin of biological form.

 Michael Denton Reads the First Pages of His Book, The Wonder of Water | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 443

In this episode of ID the Future from the vault, geneticist and biochemist Michael Denton reads the beautiful introduction to his book, The Wonder of Water. He begins at Yosemite’s Bridalveil Fall and explores how water is curiously fine-tuned for life. Indeed, thanks to a unique cluster of properties, water is able to fulfill many roles essential to our living planet.  It’s thanks to some of those properties that rivers and streams can leech and carry minerals from rock to various places they’re needed in the biosphere. Water’s unusual properties also make it an ideal medium for our circulatory system. There it serves not only to transfer nutrients and oxygen but also expel carbon dioxide, excess body heat, and waste products—again, thanks to a unique cluster of properties. Denton’s book can be purchased here.

 Paul Nelson Visits Darwin’s Galapagos Islands, Pt. 1 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 952

On this episode of ID the Future, Discovery Institute Senior Fellow and philosopher of biology Paul Nelson tells about his surprise 60th birthday gift from his wife, a trip to the “scientific Mecca,” the Galapagos Islands. Charles Darwin, whose own birthday lands today, devoted a big portion of his notes and field books from his Beagle voyage to these amazing islands, where species can be found that exist nowhere else on earth, and where from Darwin’s day until now, the creatures have no fear of humans. These unusual creatures have history, Nelson reminds us, and that history needs explaining. This is the first of three podcasts; there will be more to come.

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