I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere show

I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere

Summary: The first podcast for Sherlock Holmes devotees. News, events, entertainment, books, people and places related to Sherlock Holmes

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 Episode 64: Sherlock Holmes in Translation | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

After a long hiatus, we're back in the Collectors' Corner. This time, we're joined by the Maniac Collector himself, Don Hobbs, BSI ("Inspector Lestrade"). For those of you who don't know Don, you're in for a treat, for Don is a Texan through and through - and that means big stories, a big appetite for his interests and a big BIG collection of Sherlock Holmes books in translation. Of the 100 languages that the Canon has been translated into, Don has books in 96 of those languages. And that's only part of his 11,000 book collection. As a world traveler, he stays in touch with his network of connected individuals to keep him up to date on new pieces for his collection. The Hound of the Baskervilles in Occitan Don is also the general editor for the BSI International Series, which to date has included scholarship from Japan, Scandinavia, Australia and Italy. Future volumes include Spain and Canada, to name two. Tune in to hear about Don's inspiration, his favorite among all of his foreign editions, where he first encountered Sherlock Holmes, how collecting has affected his life, the most amazing collections he's seen of other Sherlockians, and advice for future collectors. In lieu of our Gas-Lamp, we asked Don to read one of his previous entries in the Maniac Collector's Inbox - #333 from October 19, 2008, titled "The Anti-Peter Principle." Links:Don's Blog: Inspector Lestrade's Blotter PageThe Maniac Collector Archives on Sherlock PeoriaCrew of the Barque Lone StarPrevious Collectors' Corner interviews  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 49.2 MB, 1:11:43) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Bonus MaterialDon's library (click to enlarge)        --

 Episode 63: Irregular Stain | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

The Baker Street Irregulars Manuscript Series has another entry, and once again we find ourselves chatting with co-editors Robert Katz, MD, BSI ("Dr. Ainstree") and Andrew Solberg, BSI ("Professor Coram"). Bob and Andy of course were our guests on Episode 50: A Golden Passage, and we're delighted to have them with us again to share the secret as to how lightning strikes twice and these two fine editors regroup to wrangle together scholarship, research and fun for our Sherlockian edification. This time, the BSI Manuscript Series title is Irregular Stain, and it treats the reader to a full-color reproduction of the manuscript of "The Adventure of the Second Stain" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. What's more, we even get some high-resolution Sidney Paget artwork that gives more detail of Sherlock Holmes than most readers have seen before. Join us for this chat with Bob and Andy as we discover the origins of Sherlock Holmes and Haverford College, the secret meaning of the code words "apple pie," and the possible contributor whose unfamiliar handwriting is abruptly seen in the middle of the manuscript. And be the first to know what the next entry in the BSI Manuscript Series will be. The Gas-Lamp this episode is inspired by a letter written by Vincent Starrett to Edgar Smith mentioned in the Preface of Irregular Stain, which appeared as "A Perspective on Scholarship" in the January 1953 Vol. 3, No. 1 (New Series) edition of The Baker Street Journal. Links:The BSI Manuscript SeriesIrregular Stain: A Facsimile of the Original Manuscript of "The Second Stain" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with Annotations and Commentary on the StoryAn excerpt from Irregular Stain: "Stained Vows: 'The Second Stain' and English Matrimonial Law" by Elizabeth Rosenblatt, BSI, ASH.Randall Stock's census of Sherlock Holmes manuscripts  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 51.1 MB, 1:13:16) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. --

 An Eyewitness Account to the Free Sherlock Appeal | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"A higher judge had taken the matter in hand" [STUD] In the last installment of the case of Klinger v. Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd., we were aware that the CDE had until March to file for an appeal, which it did. You'll recall the discussion we had with legal scholar and Baker Street Irregular Betsy Rosenblatt on the Special Episode in December. There's a great background of the case and next steps in that audio recording. Here is all of the coverage we've had of the case to date. It was entirely appropriate then, that the appeal hearing should take place on May 22 - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's birthday. And it was even more momentous that we Brenda Rossini, an avid Sherlockian, was in attendance at the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago for the appeal. The panel consisted of judges Flaum, Posner, and Manion. It should be noted that Judge Richard Posner is a legal scholar of some renown and a well-read jurist; in fact, he reviewed The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, in which he noted that the "Holmes stories and the Holmes persona seem to me wildly overrated, and this annotated edition an eccentric venture." With that unflattering review, we now turn it over to the observations of Ms. Rossini: Judge Posner was indeed on the panel; the Klinger v. CDE case was preceded by a number of lawyers -- at times fatuous, unimaginative, incapable of going beyond the four corners of their arguments and at wit's end when Posner interrupted (repeatedly, as in "Answer the question...Yes or No...not "If'," and that was the less brutal). The oral argument is available to listen to. It can be downloaded from or heard directly on this link from the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. For the Appellant/Conan Doyle Estate, soft-spoken, precise, cautious Benjamin Allison: Like a racehorse, Posner interrupted within seconds, and the tenor of which, was words such as "threats," "spurious," "incomprehensible." Soft-spoken Mr. Allison began with his legal argument (set forth in the Brief, so why bother repeating what's in the judges' hands?) that Klinger had merely asked for an advisory opinion of the lower court, and that the decision of the lower court should be reversed. Posner didn't like this tack one bit: Klinger had to resort to the court because You (Posner's pronoun) said you'd sue. You used a threat. He said Klinger's was a justiciable case. He rejected Allison saying that it had no "immediacy or reality." Posner scoffed then and scoffed throughout. More words from the Posner: "You put Klinger in a terrible box and caused him to spend a lot of money, and you made your threats." Allison tentatively objected to using the word "threat." But Posner said when you say "it's all copyrighted and you can't do that, you're making a threat." (if the facts are on your side, pound the facts; if the law is on your side, pound the law; if neither the facts nor the law are on your side, pound the table.) Another thing that annoyed Posner was the use of a "mural" to pose the ACD argument-- that SH and Watson are all part of the big picture. He went on and on about the mural--it really got under his thin skin-- and finally forced Allison to "abandon the mural argument." Posner also managed to weave in the memorable "Your argument is incomprehensible." Posner said the ACD estate was being ambitious and aggressive in seeking to enlarge a copyright so no one could use what was properly in the public domain. "What do you regard as non-violative?" he asked Allison. No answer. "What you're asking is "the irresistible temptation for any copyright owner to perpetuate a copyright." "It's a game being played here." Posner stated explicitly that the "46 stories" (which Appellee corrected later as 50) are no longer copyrighted. They are in the public domain; Klinger can do anything he wants with them. He is not infringing when he uses them. Klinger was not asking to infringe, "but to get the Conan Doyle Estate 'off his back.'" He advised the CDE to simply set out the l

 Episode 62: Inside the BSI Weekend | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"those weekend parties" [SOLI]  While our last episode was recorded during the BSI Weekend in New York, we thought we'd cover some of the happenings in and around the BSI Weekend itself. Our opening comments center around collecting and what makes a collector, but then we quickly launch into actual audio clips with individuals we met during the weekend. Our audio files open with an interview with  Art Levine, who has been attending BSI dinners since 1954. He knew and associated with the likes of Edgar Smith, Christopher Morley, Rex Stout, Basil Davenport and more. We then flit from one newly minted BSI to another. You'll hear the excitement and energy in their voices that testify to the thrilling nature of receiving an investiture in this literary society. We reach deep into the mail (voice and e) for our listener comments. And this episode's Gas-Lamp from the March 1995 Baker Street Journal (Vol. 45, No. 1) harkens back to our previous episode and looks at the serendipity of collecting - particularly acquiring new books during the BSI Weekend - and touches upon the collection of one Mr. Vincent Starrett. Links:Gruber Photographers have been taking the BSI dinner photos for some years, using equipment that is over 100 years old. Take a look at their setup and some photos from the dinner. Canadian Holmes - electronic editionThe Christopher Morley Knothole AssociationThe Baker Street Journal spring edition will contain the BSI Weekend recap - be sure to subscribe.Our Flipboard magazine and Scoop.it! site aggregate lots of content for your enjoyment.  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 50.4 MB, 1:13:14) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. --

 The Daily Beast Skewered Sherlock Holmes With Poor Logic | File Type: text/html | Duration: Unknown

"Some monstrous beast" [HOUN]  In his recent lambasting of Sherlock Holmes, art historian Noah Charney got in over his head. According to Charney, Holmes makes faulty assumptions and jumps too hastily to his conclusions. But if anyone in the January 26th Daily Beast pan "Is Sherlock Holmes a Good Detective?" is guilty of this, it must be Noah Charney, along with his principal source, Dr. Robin Bryant. When it comes to Sherlock Holmes, they see, but they do not observe. After muddling about with the curious incident of the dog in the night-time from "Silver Blaze," and reaching the sort of conclusions that only faulty analysis can produce, Charney further snipes at Holmes's analytical abilities by means of a numeric puzzle. "Based on the following numbers, what would you guess comes next in this sequence: 2, 4, 8, 16, X. Most people guess that the next number, X, will be 32, each number doubling. That’s a fair guess. But the answer to this particular question is not 32. The next most common estimate is 8, respondents concluding that the sequence will reverse itself. This is also reasonable, but incorrect. The correct answer is 31."Charney opines that Holmes, like most people, would have guessed 32, but this is hasty generalization – he can have no inkling what Holmes may or may not have concluded [Silly - Holmes is not like most people. - Ed.]. And why, according to Charney, is the answer 31? Because this is a question about the number of points on a circle, also known as Moser's Circle Problem. The explanation, I suggest, is an attempt to validate a foregone conclusion – the very thing Charney accuses Doyle of doing on behalf of Holmes. Nothing in the evidence militates in favor of 31 as a better solution. An equally likely answer is 28, which we arrive at by skipping the intervening even numbers, increasing the gap by a factor of one odd number each time. (Begin with 2. Skip 0 even numbers. Skip 1 even number. Skip 3 even numbers. Skip 5 even numbers, and so on.) The resulting series of numbers is 2, 4, 8, 16, 28, 42… Here's another option: XX, assuming the letter X was not a variable, but a part of the sequence hiding in plain sight. We add the first and third numbers in the series and express the sum as a Roman numeral (10 = X). We then do the same with the second and fourth numbers (20 = XX). The series is 2, 4, 8, 16, X, XX… The answer could be 9, if we surmise the first four numbers correspond directly to letters of the alphabet. In that case, they spell "BDHP," obviously (by Charney's brand of logic) an abbreviation for Browning Detective Hi Power, a short-barrelled semi-automatic pistol made in the 1990s, in 9mm caliber – a BDHP9. Then again, if numbers stand for letters, letters could stand for numbers, yielding BDHP serial number 24. But perhaps this explanation is flawed, and BDHPX stands for Brian's De Havilland Philharmonic 10th symphony. But I've played the Moffat-and-Gatiss game with you long enough: the true solution is 34, because the numeric sequence is based on Fibonacci. Begin with 2, a Fibonacci number. Double it to get 4. Take the third Fibonacci number from 2, which is 8. Double it to get 16. Take the third Fibonacci number from 8, which is 34. Double it to get 68. Take the third Fibonacci number from 34, which is 144, and so on. The sequence revealed is 2, 4, 8, 16, 34, 68, 144… Such an explanation does violence to Occam's Razor. Charney declares 31 is the right answer because, "the answer we're looking for is 31." A finer example of begging the question might be difficult to imagine, and it comes from the man who accuses Doyle of unfairly setting Holmes up for success. "Because Holmes' fate was in the hands of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," Charney criticizes, "he was set up to always succeed." Unless you count the multiple occassions when Holmes failed. And what of the real-life cases of George Edalji or Oscar Slater, wherein Doyle proved the innocence of two falsely accused men? Who are we t

 Episode 60: Sherlock Holmes - the First 60 Years | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"About sixty" [BOSC] We've arrived at the Canonical number of 60 episodes of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere, so we thought it was time to celebrate in a manner suitable to such an important number. As you well know, there were 56 short stories and four novels about Sherlock Holmes, as written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who in some circles is actually Watson's literary agent). In this discussion about the 60 stories, Burt and Scott delve into the origins of Sherlock Holmes and mine some original material from Doyle's biography Memories and Adventures. The journey takes us from a struggling young doctor who sold his first detective story for £25 to an encounter with Oscar Wilde that resulted in the second novel. We explore the role of the government and the burgeoning periodical industry that allowed the short stories catch on so rapidly, and the men who were able to capitalize on the craze, as told in The Strand Magazine & Sherlock Holmes by Robert Veld, published by the Wessex Press (our sponsors). Following up on the copyright issues in the #FreeSherlock case, we briefly explore the issue of pirated editions of the early Sherlock Holmes stories, so aptly chronicled by Donald Redmond, BSI ("Good Old Index"). We finally reach the beginnings of Sherlockian scholarship in 1902, when The Hound of the Baskervilles was halfway through serialization and a student took Watson up on his confusion with dates. This won't be the last time someone does that. From there, we're off into the Twentieth Century, with the second half of the Canon and the Sherlockian movement in full swing, culminating with the formation of some fledgling societies and a little publication known as The Baker Street Journal. We conclude with an Editor's Gas-Lamp from the April 1951 edition of The Baker Street Journal (Vol. 1, No. 2, New Series) appropriately enough, "On the Canonical Titles." LinksRandall Stock's checklist of all known copies of Beeton's Christmas Annual, 1887The fateful meeting with Oscar Wilde Sherlock Holmes Among the Pirates by Donald RedmondEpisode 13: Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in LettersThe mystery of the second edition of the Strand MagazineThe Grand Game: A Celebration of Sherlockian Scholarship, Volume One: 1902-1959 Ronald Knox and Sherlock Holmes  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 33.9 MB, 1:13:19) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock. --

 Special Episode: Free Sherlock | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"the lawyers have been at it" [REIG]  As you've no doubt observed, if you've seen anything of the news of the past few days, the "Free Sherlock" case has concluded, with the plaintiff emerging victoriously. It's been big news, getting coverage in such circles as The New York Times, The Guardian, The Hollywood Reporter, The Wall Street Journal and scores of other publications. As a listeners of our program know, Leslie S. Klinger, BSI ("The Abbey Grange") has been a frequent guest on the show, joining us for a two-part interview on his role as consultant to the Robert Downey, Jr. films, and then again talking about his Annotated Dracula work. Of course, Les is also the lead plaintiff on the lawsuit in question. You can read some background to this here ("Don't Imagine That You Can Bully Me" [CHAS]) and listen to one of our most popular episodes wherein we took up the question Who Is a Sherlockian? We were once again joined by Les, who outlined the background of the case and discussed some of the legal aspects of copyright that have led us to this juncture. We try to keep the discussion as interesting as possible for the lay people out there, and Les even manages to bring in the 1903 coronation of Edward VII as part of the case law history. As if landing an interview with the lead plaintiff in the case weren't enough, we also managed to sit down with Betsy Rosenblatt, BSI, ASH ("Lucy Ferrier"), who is not only a second generation ASH and BSI, but also a legal scholar who just happens to specialize in intellectual property law (how fortunate is that?). Betsy touches on some additional points that will undoubtedly be of interest. While we weren't able to find an Editor's Gas-Lamp per se, we used a bit of scholarship presented at the annual meeting of the Speckled Band in 1992 by the (now) late Joseph Merriam. We've included here as a bonus. Impact of the Law on the Sherlock Holmes Stories by I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere Links:The I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere apps: Android, iOS and now Windows.Free Sherlock websiteRead the legal documents here - or get them as bonus content with this episode on our apps.Episode 51: Who Is a Sherlockian?  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 34.8 MB, 1:15:59) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock. --

 Episode 59: Sherlockology | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"We both thought the best resource" [SCAN] We can unabashedly say that we're huge fans of Sherlockology. So it was with great pleasure that we sat down with Jules Coomber and David Mather, two of the four (in addition to Emma and Leif) who run the burgeoning online presence of a site that pays homage to the BBC's Sherlock and the cast and crew that are responsible for it. It's been so well done that many think that it's either an official BBC site or that it's only about the show. Go with us behind the scenes to understand who these energetic and fascinating people are, what brought them to Sherlock Holmes, what keeps them committed, the relationships they've forged with the creators and staffers of the show, and some behind-the-scenes commentary about how this is all done. And please don't forget to visit Sherlockabilia, the online shop run by these enterprising people. All of the proceeds go back into running the site, which is purely a labor of love. Technically, this qualifies as our Christmas episode, which is entirely appropriate, as Series 3 of Sherlock gets its world premiere on December 15 and the show hits the wider public on January 1. Along with these gifts, we reference our review of "The Blue Carbuncle" last year at this time, so that's well worth your time. In addition, for those who have downloaded the official I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere app on Android and iOS, we have an extra audio treat for you that you may find of interest. Of course, we cover some nuggets of current events and news - mostly around the premiere of Sherlock and its anticipation, a reference to our Weekly Links Compendium (so lovingly compiled by Matt Laffey), the growth of the Sherlock Holmes Community and our well laid-out Flipboard magazine. Our gas-lamp this week comes from the 1959 Baker Street Journal Christmas Annual and is titled "Christmas with Sherlock Holmes." We wish you the compliments of the season. Links:The I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere apps: Android and iOS.Episode 49 - our Christmas episode From our Flipboard magazine:A visit to St. Bart's HospitalAn apt quote from "The Naval Treaty" in Cultural WeeklyDavid Stuart Davies remembers Peter CushingCollector Glen Miranker featured in ForbesSherlockology's siteLocationsWardrobePropsSherlockabilia - the Sherlockology ShopHow Sherlock Holmes Made 50 Shades of Grey PossibleFrom Gillette to Brett IV: Basil, Benedict and Beyond - including the special exhibition of original wardrobe items from Sherlock Holmes on the screen.  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 38.7 MB, 1:24:30) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock. --

 Episode 58: Thankful for Sherlock Holmes | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"We must be thankful for what we've got." [VALL]  For those in the United States, November is the month in which we celebrate Thanksgiving. We thought it a fitting time to reflect on some of the things we have to be thankful for in the world of Sherlock Holmes, and they are many. The show's multiple topics and many links reflect that. First, we have our Sherlockian society meetings. Whether you live in a city that is home to a venerable institution with a decades-old group of longstanding tradition or a town with a relatively new group, the autumn seems to be a time when meetings are held, toasts are recited and friendships rekindled. And if you haven't yet listened to Episode 4: Sherlockian 101 and Episode 5: Sherlockian 101 (part 2), in which we discuss getting involved in or starting your own society, we highly recommend it. We're thankful of the work of Mr. J.D. Sutter, who helped us to transition the site from its years-old layout and to integrate content from the Baker Street Blog, to give the site its full functionality you see now. If you have a chance, get over to JD's site and thank him for his work. It would be an understatement to say we're thrilled to have Matt Laffey's Weekly Sherlock Compendium Links back on the site again. After a brief yet unintentional hiatus, Matt's comprehensive links are back with us again. We discuss the annual Baker Street Irregulars Weekend, including some of the changes afoot within the BSI itself. The BSI Press is getting dedicated leadership, with its many titles in print and on the way; the BSI Trust is also getting new leadership. We're very fortunate to live in a time when news of Sherlock Holmes fills the airwaves, print publications and intertubes, and we cap off a few of them. There's PBS, BBC, and Doctor Who news from the world of television, we remember Jeremy Brett, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's Sherlock Holmes exhibition is open, and we acknowledge a number of anniversaries of Sherlock Holmes films. We share listener comments, both written and audio, note the inaugural issue of The Watsonian, and highlight the continued spirited debate about Elementary. Listener Challenge:It's also the season for renewing subscriptions to The Baker Street Journal (one of our sponsors). We're issuing a related challenge: from now through March 2014, we're looking for 50 gift subscriptions of the BSJ to be made by our listeners. You must listen to this episode for full details. Our gas-lamp this week: since our reading on Episode 56 was "On Advocating Sherlock Holmes" and Brad Keefauver was our guest, we thought it might be appropriate to read one of Brad's own editorials ("Zismanian scholarship?") as our gas-lamp for this episode, marking the very first time we've used an online publication as our reading. Links:The I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere apps: Android and iOS.We wrote about the excitement that traditionally surrounds the BSI Weekend here.The Baker Street Irregulars and Friends Weekend website: bsiweekend.comPBS announces the air dates of Sherlock on MasterpieceThe BFI premiere of Sherlock [via Sherlockology]The first image of Sherlock Series 3Jude Law breaks the silence on the third Sherlock Holmes film.The International Sherlock Holmes Exhibition is open and they even are running a social sweepstakes.The John H. Watson Society releases The Watsonian.The e-book version of The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: Vol. 1 and Vol. 2.Sherlock Holmes London Itinerary [Visit London]Sherlock filming sites in and around London [Metro UK]TEDx talk about Sherlock Holmes and jealousyA Kickstarter for a Sherlockian deck of cardsBonus: The First Family Rides Again album [Amazon]  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 56.5 MB, 1:22:20) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your t

 Episode 57: A Sherlockian Halloween | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

"No ghosts need apply." [SUSS]  Holmes and the occult is our subject for this Halloween episode of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere, and we're joined by editor and author Charles Prepolec, who together with J.R. Campbell edited Gaslight Grimoire: Fantastic Tales of Sherlock Holmes, Gaslight Grotesque: Nightmare Tales of Sherlock Holmes, and Gaslight Arcanum: Uncanny Tales of Sherlock Holmes, joins us to talk about the intersection of Sherlock Holmes and the spooky, outre and creepy, setting the tone for the season.  Charles (who goes by @sherlockeditor on Twitter), had the great fortune to work with the likes of Barbara Hambly, Martin Powell and Kim Newman, among others, and he talks about the selection process for including authors and their works in the anthologies. Of course, Conan Doyle was no stranger to writing ghost and horror stories, and his Professor Challenger series dealt with such fantastical subjects as dinosaurs. We take Charles on a tangent and begin discussing the ideal Hollywood actor to portray the professor. Charles has contributed to Sherlock Magazine, Scarlet Street and Canadian Holmes and is a longtime Sherlockian, having been a member of the Singular Society of the Baker Street Dozen in Calgary for 20 years and a Master Bootmaker of the Bootmakers of Toronto in 2006. He spends his days at the Movie Poster Shop in Calgary and reading voraciously. Our gas-lamp is not a Gas-Lamp at all, but rather an introduction by to a collection of Conan Doyle stories, as written by John Dickson Carr. Links:EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy PublishingConan Doyle fanstasy and horror short stories "Lot No. 249," "The Horror of the Heights," and "Terror of Blue John Gap"The Autumn 2013 issue of the Baker Street JournalInternational Sherlock Holmes ExhibitionLyndsay Faye, BSI ("Kitty Winter") is on a book tour to promote Seven for a Secret, her latest Timothy Wilde novel.Big Chief Studios announced the 1:6 scale models of Cumberbatch's Holmes and Freeman's Watson, and they talk about the sculpting process.There will be no romance between Holmes and Watson in Elementary, according to the show's creator.James O'Leary has contributed a couple of significant pieces here about Elementary that are worth perusing: "Addiction, Elementary and Doyle," and "Six Cases to Which I Have Added to My Notes."Our Flipboard magazine and Scoop.it! site aggregate lots of content for your enjoyment. Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 41.5 MB, 1:00:12) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Image credit: Tony Moore for the DC/Wildstorm series The Victorian Undead --       

 Episode 56: Sherlock Peoria | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

While our show normally allows us to inform our listeners about the Sherlockian world (and occasionally share gossipy tidbits and commentary), it is always a joy when we have the opportunity to welcome a guest to interview. This occasion was no exception, as we were fortunate enough to be joined by Brad Keefauver, BSI ("Winwood Reade") from Sherlock Peoria. Brad fashions himself as more of a writer, but he certainly held his own on our program, as he discussed his first meeting with Sherlock Holmes, noting that it was far from typical. It was theatrical in nature, but you'll have to listen to hear the exact work that captured Brad's attention. We were then off and running into the sci-fi world of Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein and others, with Brad openly admitting his Trekkie origins (not that there's anything wrong with that). A class trip to Chicago brought him in touch with Beyond Baker Street and helped him realize that there was a world beyond the pastiches and films that he was most familiar with. Noted Irregular hermit Bob Burr ("The Rascally Lascar") was an mentor of sorts, and it was his editing and clockwork-like work ethic that led to some of Brad's early written contributions, such as The Elementary Methods of Sherlock Holmes and The Armchair Baskerville Tour. Other giants like John Bennett Shaw, BSI ("The Hans Sloane of My Age") and his legendary symposiums in the 1980s also led Brad to Irregular life. There is so much more that we could say about Brad, as he is a veritable Sherlockian onion. We'll let the show speak for itself. The show also covers a number of relevant news items and places for your attention; you'll find them all in the links section below. As always, we closed with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp, this time selecting "One Advocating Sherlock Holmes" from the March 1987 issue (Vol. 37, No. 1). While the topic and some of the pronouncements may be controversial, we like to think that we found some common ground in it. Links: Sherlock Peoria (the original) Sherlock Peoria (the blog) The Holmes and Watson Report Many of the links below can be found on activity on the Sherlock Holmes Community The Sherlockian Calendar by Ron Fish Recent Sherlockian titles on Kindle 16 witty Sherlock Holmes comebacks Have hours and hours of fun with this one: the Benedict Cumberbatch Name Generator A new Russian television version of Sherock Holmes A recent review of Sherlock Holmes and the Needle's Eye The discovery of the inspiration for Donnithorpe in "The Gloria Scott" IHOSE on Flipboard  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 68.9 MB, 1:15:15) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

 Episode 55: The Central Press Syndicate | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

It's a show chock full of Sherlock Holmes news! Of course, Horace Harker was a reporter for the Central Press Syndicate in "The Six Napoleons," but in our case we're acting in his stead to share some of the most significant news to our own syndicate. We share a special announcement about a future feature of the program which we'll call "The Central Press Syndicate." But in the meantime, we have much to share... We pick up with a clarification on Lenore Glen Offord ("The Old Russian Woman") and tell you all about the 2011 Baker Street Journal Christmas Annual, in which readers will be able to discover the many aspects of this intelligent and well-published writer. We also question what Investitures looked like under Edgar Smith's and Julian Wolff's time - particularly the presentation of the shilling as a medal. There's an opportunity for your feedback. Speaking of feedback, we're happy to share a good deal of listener mail and commentary from Episode 54. Thank you for all of your input and intelligent observations. We also note that we've added a function to the site called Speakpipe, which allows our listeners to provide an audio comment directly from the web page while listening to the show. We hope you'll use it. Over on our Facebook page, every week our fans have a chance to join in the fun with our Wacky Caption Wednesdays. A lineup of some of the recent ones include the iconic image of Holmes hunched over his chemical set and the comparison to Mentos; and Holmes springing to action in "The Speckled Band" with inspiration from DEVO. On the news front, we have items from the next season of "Sherlock" from BBC One, and news from Steven Moffat that there's a clue that everyone missed with regard to Sherlock Holmes's death. And the announcement of the next installation of the absolutely phenomenal set of events called From Gillette to Brett that look at Sherlock Holmes of the screen. Also events-wise, while we missed the Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Place conference in Minnesota, we'll be featuring a report from the #SHMN13 goings on. For topics more controversial, we have the latest goings-on around the so-called "Free Sherlock" lawsuit between Leslie Klinger and the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd., which indicate that a summary judgment is being requested, with the decision due in the coming weeks. And the mid-year letter from the Baker Street Irregulars' Wiggins, Michael Whelan contains a reprint of "The World of Sherlockians" that was shared on the BSJ website Finally, we concluded with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp on the importance sparking plugs, this time choosing September 1982 (Vol. 32, No. 3). In it, you'll find the definitive and seminal phrase as to what it takes to establish a Sherlockian society. Links: IHOSE on Flipboard BSJ Items for Sale Charles Augustus Magnusson is here, as is the trailer for the new season Steven Moffat on the clue that everyone missed  From Gillette to Brett IV: Basil, Benedict and Beyond - Sept. 12-14, 2014 in Bloomington, IN Free Sherlock update The Hollywood Reporter on the latest Conan Doyle Estate lawsuit Activity on the Sherlock Holmes Community  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 47.7 MB, 1:09:28) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

 Episode 54: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

It's easy to assume that Sherlock Holmes's powers were something of an anomaly - that Holmes was a superhero with something akin to super powers, and we mere mortals cannot attain the same level of expertise and professionalism. But that assumption would be wrong, as author Maria Konnikova has made abundantly clear. In her book Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, Konnikova, who holds a doctorate in psychology from Columbia University and writes the "Literally Psyched" column for Scientific American, deconstructs the process of observation, deduction and self-knowledge. In doing so, she gives the reader concrete examples of how to approach the fabled scientific method, along with the psychology behind the process. While we have previously reviewed her book, our conversation with Maria in this episode took personal turns and got us much deeper into the creative process, her inspiration, and even a back story to Holmes that gave him these powers. In addition, we covered topics from the ridiculous to the sublime such as movie trailers and voice overs, storytelling, suggestions for getting your fix of Sherlock Holmes news links and more. We also discussed the need to merge this site and the Baker Street Blog and put out a call for assistance from those with technical programming aptitude to help us with the migration and site upgrade. We also asked for feedback on our process, frequency and topics of the show - we'd love to hear from you! Finally, we concluded with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp, this time choosing the most recent entry from the Summer 2013 (Vol. 63, No. 2). Links: Video chat with director Kurt MattilaTrailer for Jerry Seinfeld's ComedianMastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes by Maria Konnikova (Amazon)How researchers are using fiction to make their reports accessible to the publicSherlock Holmes For Dummies on FacebookAlways1895.netChristopher Morley's "In Memoriam Sherlock Holmes" in the Saturday Review of LiteratureFantastic chronology of the Canon by TheNorwoodBuilderNews links to keep you up to date on all things Sherlock Holmes: the Sherlock Holmes Scoop.it page and the I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere Flipboard magazine  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 49.3 MB, 1:11:47) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.    

 Episode 53: For the Sake of the Trust | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

The Baker Street Irregulars are widely known as a literary society dedicated to the study of Sherlock Holmes. Since 1934 the group has been gathering in New York City for its annual dinner and weekend festivities and has embarked on a significant publishing effort centered around its own history, international Sherlockian societies' scholarship, and analysis of extant manuscripts of the Canon. But more than that, the BSI wants to ensure that its own history and that of its members are recorded for posterity and the researchers who may be interested in it sometime in the future. Enter the Baker Street Irregulars Trust. In this episode, Burt and Scott interview Tom Francis, BSI ("The Imperial Opera at Warsaw), who is the Chair of the Trust. Tom helps us understand how and why the Trust was established, what its aims are, and how you can help this august institution. We discuss some of the holdings of the Houghton Library at Harvard University, where the Trust is housed, including the H.W. Bell collection - Bell having been an early Sherlockian scholar and member of The Speckled Band of Boston. The BSI Trust is a nonprofit organization as a subset of the Baker Street Irregulars. Donations are welcome, but original materials are more desirable. Correspondence of Irregulars and their other papers are welcome - but the Trust does is not interested in everything Sherlockian or related to all Sherlockian societies. Books and other items that are not a core part of the Trust typically go up for sale or auction. Tom breaks ground as he utters a phrase never before heard on this program - tune in to find out exactly what that is - and even begins to delve into what the future of the Trust looks like in our digital/electronic times. Links: The BSI TrustThe finding aid for the Houghton Library collectionsHow individuals can make monetary donations or materials donations to the BSIT  "For the Sake of the Trust" - the BSI Trust newsletter  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 55.8 MB, 1:00:48) Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

 Episode 52: Sherlockian Mythbusters | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

When a figure like Sherlock Holmes has been around for over a century, there are bound to be misconceptions that creep into public thinking. We blame this not on carelessness or laziness but rather on the overwhelming popularity of the great detective. The image of Holmes clad in deerstalker and Inverness cape, clenching a Meerschaum pipe in his teeth is the universal, if cliched, image of a detective. But was it true? We were recently reminded of a number of classic myths about Sherlock Holmes, thanks to a contest being sponsored by The Baker Street Journal (also a sponsor of our program): it has long been rumored that men wore black armbands throughout the city of London after reading "The Final Problem" in the Strand Magazine. And only anecdotal evidence has been referenced whenever this supposed fact is brought up. The BSJ is offering a free year's subscription to anyone who can definitively prove that such mourning attire was worn in response to the death of Sherlock Holmes. That got us to thinking: what other Sherlockian myths are there? And are we guilty of propagating any of them ourselves? Join us for a quick game show-style question and answer session on the topic, as well as a reading of your comments from our last show and some recent news from the world of Sherlock Holmes. The Editor's Gas-Lamp: Rather than the traditional gas-lamp, which began under Edgar Smith's editorship of the Baker Street Journal, we thought we would mark May 5 as the 123rd anniversary of Christopher Morley's birth by reading two of his poems: the very short "The Secret" and the quite remarkable "Toulemonde." Links: BSI Archival History Series available for saleThe Baker Street Journal contestSherlock Holmes-related 2013 Edgar Award winners and nominees"Stand with me here upon the terrace" for Irving KamilThe Deal Table from the BSJThe Christopher Morley Literary Estate on FacebookSherlockian Mythbusters: "Thor Bridge" and "The Engineer's Thumb"  Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 60.2 MB, 1:05:42) You do subscribe to us on iTunes, don't you? Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us mumble their hallowed names on the show: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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