Audio Books Podcasts

Librivox: Five Children and It by Nesbit, E. (Edith) show

Librivox: Five Children and It by Nesbit, E. (Edith)Join Now to Follow

This delightful novel begins when a family of five children moves from London to the English countryside. While playing in a gravel pit soon after the move, they discover an ancient and rather grumpy sand-fairy known as the Psammead, who agrees to grant one wish of theirs per day. The children’s wishes send them on adventure after adventure, but rarely turn out as expected. (Summary by Kara)

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Librivox: Treasure Island by Stevenson, Robert Louis show

Librivox: Treasure Island by Stevenson, Robert LouisJoin Now to Follow

Treasure Island is an adventure novel, a thrilling tale of "buccaneers and buried gold." Traditionally considered a coming of age story, it is an adventure tale of superb atmosphere, character and action, and also a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality—as seen in Long John Silver—unusual for children's literature then and now. (Summary from wikipedia.org)

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Librivox: Road, The by Sassoon, Siegfried show

Librivox: Road, The by Sassoon, SiegfriedJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you eight different readings of Siegfried Sassoon's The Road , a weekly poetry project. (Summary by Annie Coleman)

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Librivox: Open Library, The by Kahle, Brewster show

Librivox: Open Library, The by Kahle, BrewsterJoin Now to Follow

Text of the speech given by Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive , at the launch of the Open Library in October 2005. LibriVox was invited to the launch, and produced audio recordings for "An International Episode," and "Old Christmas," two of the first books scanned into the Open Library collection. (Summary by Hugh)

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Librivox: Communist Manifesto, The by Marx, Karl show

Librivox: Communist Manifesto, The by Marx, KarlJoin Now to Follow

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote their Manifesto in December 1847, as a guide to the fundamental principles and practices of Communists. The Manifesto also predicted the ultimate downfall of the capitalist system. (Summary written by Gesine)

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Librivox: Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei by Marx, Karl show

Librivox: Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei by Marx, KarlJoin Now to Follow

Karl Marx und Friedrich Engels schrieben ihr Manifest im Dezember 1847, als Leitfaden fuer die grundsaetzlichen Prinzipien und Praktiken des Kommunismus. Das Manifest sagte ausserdem den Untergang des Kapitalistismus’ voraus. (Zusammenfassung von Gesine)

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Librivox: Twas the Night Before Christmas (A Visit From St. Nicholas) by Moore, Clement Clarke show

Librivox: Twas the Night Before Christmas (A Visit From St. Nicholas) by Moore, Clement ClarkeJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you nine different readings of Clement C. Moore's 'Twas the Night Before Christmas , a weekly poetry project. (Summary by Annie Coleman)

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Librivox: Happy Prince and Other Tales, The by Wilde, Oscar show

Librivox: Happy Prince and Other Tales, The by Wilde, OscarJoin Now to Follow

Collection of children’s stories written in 1888, dealing primarily with love and selfishness. These stories are generally sad, with a moralistic message. The collection includes: The Happy Prince, The Nightingale and the Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket. (Summary written by Joy Chan)

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Librivox: Awful German Language, The by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Awful German Language, The by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

If you’ve ever studied German (and maybe even if you haven’t), you’re likely to find this short essay to be hilarious. Published as Appendix D from Twain’s 1880 book A Tramp Abroad , this comedic gem outlines the pitfalls one will encounter when trying to wrap one’s mind around the torturous German cases, adjective endings, noun genders, and verb placement. (Summary by Kara)

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Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

Come and hear the strange tail of The Boss Hank Morgan, a modern day (at the time of publication) Connecticut Yankee who inexplicably finds himself transported to the court of the legendary King Arthur (as the title of the book implies). Hank, or simply, The Boss, as he comes to be most frequently known, quickly uses his modern day knowledge and education to pass himself off as a great magician, to get himself out of all sorts of surprising, (and frequently amusing) situations, as well as to advance the technological and cultural status of the nation in which he finds himself. In the rather un-subtle sub-text of the story, Twain uses The Boss to express a surprisingly pragmatic and frequently contradictory philosophy. The Boss explores the relative merits of Democracy, and Monarchy, he expresses his views on the “Nature v. Nurture” debate, he frequently speaks forcefully against an established Church, but just as strongly advocates for religion and a variety of churches (just not a compulsory one) and he devotes at least one afternoon to introducing his companions to the concept of inflation. In a far more subtle, yet no less forceful manner, the Boss shares with the reader some views about taxation, slavery (both literal and wage slavery), trade unions, the origins of the German language, the nature of marriage, and probably most powerfully, death. It is a tall order for a relatively brief text, but Twain manages it all with surprising clarity. No one will agree fully with the Boss on all of these matters, and I would be surprised if Twain himself would. In fact the Boss’s views are so pragmatic, and often contradictory, the reader is left to wonder if Twain himself is alternately speaking through the Boss, and setting him up as a straw man. Either way it is a delightful story and a great piece of American Literature, to say nothing of an excellent argument for education. (Review written by Steve Andersen)

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