Audio Books Podcasts

Librivox: Declaration of Independence of the United States of America by United States, Founding Fathers of the show

Librivox: Declaration of Independence of the United States of America by United States, Founding Fathers of theJoin Now to Follow

Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. It was ratified by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. (Summary from wikipedia.org)

By LibriVox

Librivox: I Do Not Love Thee by Norton, Caroline Elizabeth Sarah show

Librivox: I Do Not Love Thee by Norton, Caroline Elizabeth SarahJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you twenty different readings of Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton’s I Do Not Love Thee , a weekly poetry project. (Summary by Annie Coleman)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Secret Garden, The by Burnett, Frances Hodgson show

Librivox: Secret Garden, The by Burnett, Frances HodgsonJoin Now to Follow

Mary Lennox is a spoiled, middle-class, self-centred child who has been recently orphaned. She is accepted into the quiet and remote country house of an uncle, who has almost completely withdrawn into himself after the death of his wife. Mary gradually becomes drawn into the hidden side of the house: why does she hear the crying of a unseen child? Why is there an overgrown, walled garden, its door long locked? (Summary by Peter)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Short Story Collection Vol. 001 by Various show

Librivox: Short Story Collection Vol. 001 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

Librivox’s Short Story Collection 001: a collection of 10 short works of fiction in the public domain read by a variety of Librivox members.

By LibriVox

Librivox: Song (Donne version) by Donne, John show

Librivox: Song (Donne version) by Donne, JohnJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you seven different readings of the short poem Song by John Donne, a weekly poetry project. Song is a bitter little poem on the falsity of women: search the world for ages, see mythical wonders, but you’ll not find a true woman. Deep hurt is the bane of the loving heart. (Summary by Peter Yearsley)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

Come and hear the strange tail of The Boss Hank Morgan, a modern day (at the time of publication) Connecticut Yankee who inexplicably finds himself transported to the court of the legendary King Arthur (as the title of the book implies). Hank, or simply, The Boss, as he comes to be most frequently known, quickly uses his modern day knowledge and education to pass himself off as a great magician, to get himself out of all sorts of surprising, (and frequently amusing) situations, as well as to advance the technological and cultural status of the nation in which he finds himself. In the rather un-subtle sub-text of the story, Twain uses The Boss to express a surprisingly pragmatic and frequently contradictory philosophy. The Boss explores the relative merits of Democracy, and Monarchy, he expresses his views on the “Nature v. Nurture” debate, he frequently speaks forcefully against an established Church, but just as strongly advocates for religion and a variety of churches (just not a compulsory one) and he devotes at least one afternoon to introducing his companions to the concept of inflation. In a far more subtle, yet no less forceful manner, the Boss shares with the reader some views about taxation, slavery (both literal and wage slavery), trade unions, the origins of the German language, the nature of marriage, and probably most powerfully, death. It is a tall order for a relatively brief text, but Twain manages it all with surprising clarity. No one will agree fully with the Boss on all of these matters, and I would be surprised if Twain himself would. In fact the Boss’s views are so pragmatic, and often contradictory, the reader is left to wonder if Twain himself is alternately speaking through the Boss, and setting him up as a straw man. Either way it is a delightful story and a great piece of American Literature, to say nothing of an excellent argument for education. (Review written by Steve Andersen)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Song My Paddle Sings, The by Johnson, E. Pauline show

Librivox: Song My Paddle Sings, The by Johnson, E. PaulineJoin Now to Follow

Librivox’s weekly poetry project for the week of February 5, 2006 offers fourteen versions of "The Song My Paddle Sings" from the collection Flint and Feather by E. Pauline Johnson. E. Pauline Johnson, also known as Tekahionwake, was born to the Mohawk Chief G.H.M. Johnson (Onwanonsyshon), and his wife, Emily S. Howells, a lady of pure English parentage. Pauline, born and raised in Canada, was a great reader and began writing poetry as a child. She died in 1913 after having poetry published in periodicals in several countires and collections of her work published in book form. (Summary adapted from the "Biographical Sketch" included in Flint and Feather )

By LibriVox

Librivox: American Indian Fairy Tales by Larned, William Trowbridge show

Librivox: American Indian Fairy Tales by Larned, William TrowbridgeJoin Now to Follow

With no written language, Native Americans living in the Lake Superior region passed their cultural identity down through the generations by way of stories. Far more than mere tales to amuse children, they passed along the collective wisdom of the tribes. In the 1830s, government Indian Agent and ethnologist Henry R Schoolcraft learned the language of these people and went out to collect and preserve their stories before the tribes disappeared under the westward rush of American civilization. Though these stories were recast as children’s fairy tales in the 1920s, they contain much of the old wisdom of a culture which has largely disappeared. (Summary by Chip)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Journey to the Interior of the Earth, A by Verne, Jules show

Librivox: Journey to the Interior of the Earth, A by Verne, JulesJoin Now to Follow

Journey to the Interior of the Earth is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne (published in the original French as Voyage au centre de la Terre). The story involves a professor who leads his nephew and hired guide down a volcano in Iceland to the “center of the Earth”. They encounter many adventures, including prehistoric animals and natural hazards, eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy. (Summary from wikipedia.org)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 003 by Various show

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 003 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

Librivox’s Short Poetry Collection 003: a collection of 20 public-domain poems.

By LibriVox