Old Millennials Remember Movies show

Old Millennials Remember Movies

Summary: Two (old) Millennials re-watch and discuss movies from the era of their childhood (80s to 90s). Hold on to your butts for thoughtful and amusing conversation about the movies you loved, the movies you forgot, and the movies that should have stayed in the box.

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 Ferris Bueller’s Day Off – ep 86 – 1986 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:12:16

Life moves pretty fast. Just not the middle section of "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." Okay, so that was a bit of a cheap shot. By many accounts, this John Hughes classic deserves its place as one of the most enduring comedies of the 1980s, despite a few questionable narrative pit stops in the movie's middle-act travelogue of Chicago. Matthew Broderick's character is in the title, but he may actually be one of the movie's least interesting characters. Jennifer Grey as Ferris' perpetually pissed sister Jeannie and Alan Ruck as Ferris' depressed best friend Cameron steal the movie at every turn, in part because it's their characters who must grow and change as the result of Ferris' antics. Plus Cameron's "phone voice" endures as one of the best comic line deliveries of all time. Call me SIR, GAWDDAMNIT! MIND YOUR Ps and Qs, BUSTER! The Old Millennials hosts discuss their complicated history with "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." Angela could never tolerate the stupidity of every single adult in the movie. And Tyler, despite having fond memories of watching the movie many times growing up, hasn't been compelled to watch it in years. So how do they feel after this long-overdue re-watch? And what does Jack Sparrow have to do with any of this? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? The Back to School miniseries returns to "Old Millennials Remember Movies" with "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," the John Hughes-penned comedy that (probably) inspired the "Home Alone" franchise. Really! Mr. Rooney gets violently pranked worse than a Wet Bandit!

 The Negotiator – ep85 – 1998 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:31:28

YOU WANT MY BLOOD?! TAKE IT! TAKE MY BLOOD! Samuel L. Jackson delivers a bunch of great lines in "The Negotiator," one of the surprisingly few mainstream movies where the Man gets true top billing. Sam Jackson is a national treasure, and come to think of it, we'd love to see Nic Cage and Sammy J. run around a "National Treasure" sequel. In most ways, "The Negotiator" is a pretty standard hostage stand-off movie, though Jackson and the deep supporting cast elevates the action at every turn. We're talking John Spencer (RIP LEO!), Ron "Alias is a show about a spy" Rifkin, David Morse (as a red herring and THE reason why people protest police hyper-aggression and brutality), Paul Giamatti at his most Giamatti and Christopher Plummer... wait, oh, we haven't yet digitally switched in Chris Plummer for this movie?! Time to get on that, F. Gary Gray. Enough dancing around the subject: "The Negotiator" is the first Old Millennials Remember Movies feature with Kevin Spacey, and it's one of the first things we've seen with him since the fallout of his deserved exile from Hollywood. How does Spacey the person recontextualize Spacey the actor? The Old Millennials try to figure out if his "good guy" character in "The Negotiator" gets tarnished by the real world. Old Millennials Remember The Negotiator Tyler and Angela also talk about the noticeable avoidance of racial conflict in "The Negotiator." Could this movie be made the same way in 2020? Did it miss opportunities in 1998 to explore more complex themes? The Old Millennials discuss it all, as well as the baffling scene where Sam Jackson and the rest of the cast dance to that awful "Cotton Eye Joe" song. All that, plus popular segments, "What Did Roger Say?," "Angela Explains It All," "Tea Time with Tyler," and a new Secret Word game we totally ripped off from a Minnesota Twins baseball podcast. Oh, and we finally watched HBO's acclaimed "Watchmen" series. Phew. So much entertainment, right? Don't say no. You never say no to a hostage taker! Also discussed on this episode: Watchmen (2019 TV series) First Cow (2020) The Assistant (2020) The Last Full Measure (2020) Check out this related past content from Old Millennials Remember Movies The Long Kiss Goodnight -episode 45 - 1996 Unbreakable - episode 30 - 2000 11 Great Samuel L. Jackson performances - 2000-2019

 Rad – ep 84 – 1986 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:28:43

Do you like kids on bikes doing sweet jumps!? What about Aunt Becky (pre-"Full House" and pre-pre college admissions scandal) performing THE quintessential prom dance/sl0-mo bicycle stunt/bicycle posing sequence of the 20th century? How about sassy kid sisters who tell jerkfaces to "GET OUTTA TOWN, JACK!"? Still not enough for you? Fine, then here's a stunt track featuring a giant cereal bowl of Kix! Yeah, bitch, KID TESTED, MOTHER APPROVED. "Rad" is a certifiable cult-classic, and until recently, hadn't been available on digital platforms. Now it's easy to find and absolutely worth a watch... mostly for the dance/bicycle sequence set to "Send Me an Angel" by Real Life. It's INCREDIBLE. Honestly, the hosts of Old Millennials Remember Movies don't even remember what happened in the movie after this scene. They blacked out from pure euphoria. Okay, so co-hosts Tyler and Angela do discuss other things about "Rad," including whether or not bike tricks are cool and how the corporate bad guy's plan to stop a local kid from winning on Hell Track becomes needlessly convoluted. Thank God there's a character that simplifies it all for us with a single line: "No sponsor, no race-y." The Old Millennials also talk about their own sweet bicycle stories as kids. Lots of long rides to Circle K to trade bottle tops for free Sprite. And mini-jumps off curbs! Crossing busy streets! So join Lori Loughlin, a real human named Bart, twin scumbag racers wearing space suits, the burly stuntman in the ill-fitting Lori Loughlin wig, and the hero kid with a super punchable face in "Rad," the definitive BMX movie alongside the Nicole Kidman-starring "BMX Bandits" from 1983. That one's on Amazon Prime, and the plot is all about walkie talkies. So, watch them both! Serious questions though - Is our hero boy Cru a cheater? He keeps jumping outside the barriers of the race track. We don't know anything about BMX racing, obviously. Also discussed in this episode: BMX Bandits (1983) Chopping Mall (1986) The Old Guard (2020) Becky (2020) The Willoughbys (2020) Feel the Beat (2020) Psych 2: Lassie Come Home (2020) 30 Rock reunion/upfront special (2020)  

 The Fifth Element – ep 83 – 1997 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 59:47

Leeloo Dallas Multipass! Pack your bags for Fhloston Paradise and get ready for "The Fifth Element," a very weird, very French science-fiction adventure. It's endlessly re-watchable, thanks to its constantly evolving plot, strange side characters and Gary Oldman having an intense telephone conversation with a giant evil blob. Oh, did we mention his hair? And the "Texas" accent? Milla Jovovich rightfully became a star after "The Fifth Element," playing the titular not-stone regarded by every other character in the movie as a "perfect" being. She quickly becomes a badass too, which softens the movie's near-constant Leeloo body ogling. Hey, at least us pre-teens in the 90s appreciated it. Bruce Willis is doing his 90s Bruce Willis thing as Corbin Dallas, a wisecracking soldier-turned-flying cab driver who is kinda annoyed by this "save the world" business. Meanwhile, Chris Tucker plays Ruby Rhod, the loudest loudmouth radio DJ in the universe, and just when you think his antics are going to ruin the movie... BOOM, he flat out steals it, even from an equally peacocking Oldman. Old Millennials Remember The Fifth Element podcast Hosts Tyler and Angela discuss the gender dynamics of "The Fifth Element," the film' charming tonal shifts, the prospect of swiping sets from "Stargate," Multipass antics, all-powerful healing/life creating cryogenic chambers, director Luc Besson's extended commitment to cross-cutting weird action,  and Tyler's obsession with a certain robot bartender. "You want some more?" So queue up that hip-hop Opera music, and be careful not to push the self-destruct button on the bottom of your super gun and listen to the Old Millennials discuss a 90s blockbuster favorite. Also discussed in this episode: Greyhound (2020) The Banker (2020) Police Story 2 (1988) Cursed (2020 TV series) Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017)

 The Big Green (1995) and Ladybugs (1992) – ep 82 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:20:45

Get ready for the youth soccer edition of Old Millennials Remember Movies! Okay, disclaimer: Hosts Angela and Tyler don't really like soccer, and they really don't know why they decided to watch these little-seen soccer movies from the 90s. "The Big Green" is your standard live-action Disney sports comedy - think "The Mighty Ducks" only less good. Steve Guttenberg is here as a small-town sheriff who coaches...err, wait, the British teacher coaches the team. Actually, The Gutes serves no story purpose in the movie. He's there to hit on the teacher and serve a perfunctory role in the film's immigration subplot. Yes, "The Big Green" tackles the topic of immigration with surprising compassion. But there's also a bunch of soccer in the movie, including a climactic "big game" that feels like it plays out in real-time. Why are we watching scenes of kids throwing the ball in from out of bounds? Show us the goals and MOVE IT ALONG! The Old Millennials also discuss the Rodney Dangerfield turd, "Ladybugs," a movie that was probably offensive back in 1992, but is MOST DEFINITELY offensive now. Lots of Rodney (as a guy named Chester, not better) making derogatory remarks towards women, and don't let us forget to mention the implied rape joke that gets played in the movie's theatrical trailer. Oh yeah, and a boy puts on a wig to play for a girl's soccer team. At least in "The Big Green," the team is co-ed and nobody tries to act superior to anybody else. Look, listen to the podcast, but do yourself a favor and NEVER watch "Ladybugs." It will only bring you pain. Also discussed in this episode: Palm Springs (2020) The Baby-Sitters Club (2020 TV series) Troop Zero (2020) Police Story (1985) She's Gotta Have It (1986) School Daze (1988) Check out these related past episodes of Old Millennials Remember Movies March Madness Sports Movie Bracket Mania - ep72 Days of Thunder -ep41 - 1990 The Mighty Ducks - ep29 - 1992

 Goonies – ep 81 – 1985 plus Hamilton | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:17:22

Note to self: Resist the urge to start this post with "Hey, you guys!" Don't do it. That's so lame. Every podcast about "The Goonies" probably starts with "Hey, you guys!" Or at least the lame podcasts do. Ah, screw it. Hey, you guys! It's the Old Millennials Remember Movies episode on the 80s classic, "The Goonies." "The Goonies" is beloved by many Old Millennials. In fact, co-host Angela has a complicated equation on how to determine if someone either loves "The Goonies" or thinks it's totally overrated. Okay, so it's not complicated, but that sounded enticing, right? Man, the sales pitch on this episode isn't going so well. Old Millennials Remember Movies The Goonies podcast Hosts Tyler and Angela have seen "The Goonies" too many times to count. Tyler used to have a "hot take" about the movie, but does he now? Why wouldn't the owner of the Goonies house in Astoria, Oregon let us rummage around the place when we rolled through town a few years back? Why does Chunk talk so goddamn much? And did our kids get freaked out by all the dead bodies in the movie? The answer to that last one is definitely YES. We discuss the legacy of "The Goonies," as well as what the likes of Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Joey Pants, Corey Feldman and producer Steven Spielberg said about the film on a recent Zoom reunion call. Fun fact: Director Richard Donner doesn't know how to use a computer! We also talk giant octopuses, penis statues and the scene-stealing genius of Martha Plimpton. Oh, and the first several minutes of the show is devoted to gushing about the release of "Hamilton" on Disney+. If you thought we were nerds before, just wait until you hear us talk about "Hamilton." Also discussed on this episode: Hamilton (2020) Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga (2020)

 One Crazy Summer -ep80 – 1986 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:25:51

The 80s-era John Cusack movie nobody talks about, "One Crazy Summer" is ONE. CRAZY. MOVIE. Something insane happens every minute of this 1986 screwball teen comedy, about a wannabe artist named Hoops McCann (he's actually bad at basketball) who heads to Nantucket for summer vacation with his friend George CALAMARI. Other names in this movie include Egg Stork, Ack-Ack, Squid, Cookie and Stain. I suppose that should be expected, given that the movie was made by a guy named Savage Steve Holland. For one, Bobcat Goldthwait (as Egg) is really going for it here. If you thought 90s-era Jim Carrey was intense, just take a look at all the nonsense coming out of Bobcat. There are motorcycle gang chases, a mechanical murderous dolphin, cartoonish sight gags, actual cartoon sequences, an elaborate prank involving a bazooka and a lobster-infested pool, an extended Godzilla gag, dog kicking, a sailboat built out of a sports car and a BANGIN' 80s-era anthem performed by granola dreamgirl Demi Moore. Old Millennnials Remember One Crazy Summer podcast Co-host Angela never saw this movie growing up, so she's understandably baffled by nearly every frame of "One Crazy Summer," a movie that's been somewhat difficult to watch in recent years (it's now available to rent on platforms like Amazon Prime). Tyler, on the other hand, watched this movie at an extremely young age, apparently fueled by his older brother's love of... sailing movies? In this episode, Tyler explores his own memories of the film, the conflicting memories of his brother and whether or not any of it matters when re-watching it 20+ years later. Tyler and Angela also discuss the logistics of the film's climatic regatta race, the murderer's row of "Hey, I know that guy!" actors in the movie and the questionable decision-making of the film's banker character (Why are you helping the man who just STRANGLED you?!). Tyler also shares his own summer-after-high-school story worthy of inclusion in this crazy movie. It involves poop. Also discussed in this episode: Artemis Fowl (2020) A Kid in King Arthur's Court (1995) Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco (1996) Clockers (1995) Get on the Bus (1996) Cars (2006) Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)  

 Galaxy Quest – ep 79 – 1999 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 49:47

By Grabthar's Hammer, what a savings! "Galaxy Quest" was well-reviewed back in 1999, but it only found moderate success at the box office. The PG rating suggested it was a kid's movie, but the humor spoke more to a generation that appreciated the world of "Star Trek" and retro science-fiction. Luckily, the following for "Galaxy Quest" has only grown over the years, with many now placing it alongside the other great movies of a pretty great movie year. As Stefon would say, "'Galaxy Quest' has everything!" Space aliens, Tim the Tool Man Taylor, rock monsters, Ripley in a blond wig, (brief) time travel, Monk, a Dwight Schrute cameo, an annoyed Alan Rickman and the scene-stealing genius of Sam Rockwell as a wannabe "red shirt" who just doesn't want to die before the first commercial break. Old Millennials Remember Movies Galaxy Quest Podcast Tyler and Angela discuss their love of the movie, how it went introducing their young kids to it ("Look, Dad, that's Santa Claus!") and the film's surprisingly emotional dramatic sequences. Tim Allen can act, kids! Also, what's with the darn censorship of the swear words? One of hosts considers "Galaxy Quest" to be the best "Star Trek" movie of all time. His name is Tyler, and, yes he's seen "The Wrath of Khan." He's never going to change his mind. Never give up. NEVER surrender! Also discussed in this episode Da 5 Bloods (2020) Malcolm X (1992) Inside Man (2006) The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (2004) Supernatural (TV series)

 Point Break – ep 78 – 1991 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:14:38

Is there a better name in American cinema than Johnny Utah? No. In the 90s action classic, "Point Break," Keanu Reeves plays the legendary undercover FBI agent who is first described as "young, dumb and full of..." well, it's kinda gross honestly, but it's an accurate description. Johnny poses as a surfer to learn more about an elite squad of bank robbers (fellow cop Gary Busey figures out they're surfers because BUSEY). The robbers wear masks of ex-presidents, and, because they never go for the vault, they always get away clean. Well, until Johnny gets involved. Patrick Swayze swoons as a fellow surfer who teaches Johnny a new way of life and, oh shit, Bodhi's the bad guy?! No! We like him! He's got a heart of gold, right? Oh, he does WHAT during the movie's final robbery? Damn, Swayze. Old Millennials Remember 'Point Break' podcast Director Kathryn Bigelow would win an Oscar for making "The Hurt Locker" in 2008, but she definitely earned her Awesome Card with "Point Break." Tyler and Angela discuss their (cable) history with the movie, Keanu's underrated performance (really!), throwing dogs, "Fast & Furious" connections and how those "Mythbusters" folks totally missed the point of those spectacular sky diving scenes. We also discuss why Edgar Wright chose to immortalize "Point Break" in his brilliant cop satire "Hot Fuzz" in 2007. Spoiler: He did it because "Point Break" is awesome. So don't go breaking your own rules ("You're BLOWING IT, MAN!"), catch some waves and definitely stay away from that surfer punk from the Red Hot Chili Peppers as the Old Millennials crew kicks off their summer blockbuster season with "Point Break." Don't worry, we barely even mention the remake. Also discussed in this episode: The Vast of Night (2020) Sonic the Hedgehog (2020) Space Force (2020 television series) Batman Begins (2005) The Dark Knight (2008) Horns (2013) Check out these related episodes of Old Millennials Remember Movies! Predator - 1987 - episode 18 Congo - 1995 - episode 43 Bad Boys Trilogy - 1995-2020 - episode 68  

 Matilda – ep77 – 1996 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:02:57

"Listen you little wiseacre. I'm smart; you're dumb. I'm big; you're little. I'm right; you're wrong. And there's nothing you can do about it." - Parents to their kids during the 2020 quarantine. Actually, that's a Danny DeVito rant from "Matilda," a charming movie adaptation of the Roald Dahl children's book. Most of the adults in this movie are just awful to poor little Matilda, an adorable six-year-old played by the quintessential adorable 90s kid, Mara Wilson ("Mrs. Doubtfire," the "Miracle on 34th Street" remake). The adults should probably stop messing with her though, because Matilda has Jean Gray-level telekinesis. She can move classroom objects with her mind! Oooooh, ahhh! That's how it always starts. But then later there's running and.. and.. screaming... Danny DeVito directed the movie and also plays Matilda's absentee dad, who is only half as deplorable as Frank Reynolds (still bad), though he and mom Rhea Pearlman are saints compared to Principal Trunchbull (Pam Ferris). Trunchbull throws mouthy kids into a pokey torture chamber and throws little girls across campus by the pigtails. It'd all be deeply disturbing if not for that distinct Dahl whimsy (and some cartoonish stylistic choices). Old Millennials Remember Matilda podcast Angela and Tyler discuss their history with "Matilda" and all the reasons why the film has endured over the years. What makes the story so appealing to kids? Are they aware of Miss Honey's agonizingly tragic backstory? And can impatient and exasperated parents learn a few lessons about how not to treat young children? Or are we all, at some level, as awful as the Wormwood parents? Hey, in our defense, we think we'd at least be able to tell the difference between cops and boat salesmen. Also, remember that kid who dances with Drew Barrymore in "The Wedding Singer?" He gets to eat a giant cake in this movie. That kid rules. Also discussed in this episode The Lovebirds (2020) The Last Dance documentary series (2020) Riverdale TV series  

 Stuart Little – ep76 – 1999 plus Quarantine Movies | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:05:56

Have you ever read "Stuart Little," the classic children's book by E.B. White? It's... not how you remember it. Let's just be honest here: "Charlotte's Web" is E.B. White's masterpiece. "Stuart Little" is weird. Old Millennials Remember Movies host Angela Yoshiko discusses reading the book to her children recently, and why the kids thought it was totally stupid. Truthfully, the Old Millennials don't recall seeing the 1999 CGI/live-action hybrid film version of "Stuart Little," which adapts almost nothing from the original book. The names are the same. There's a boat and a car. That's about it. Once you know what's in that original book though, you'll understand why screenwriter M. Night Shyamalan (yes, really!) chose to ignore it all. Stuart Little and Stuart Little 2 Old Millennials Remember Movies podcast Angela and Tyler talk about "Stuart Little" and the sequel "Stuart Little 2," both featuring the voice of Michael J. Fox and live-action performances from Geena Davis (hey gurrrl), Hugh Laurie (who is actively working on his Dr. House voice across both films) and little JOHNNY LIPNICKI, the little kid from "Jerry Maguire" who knew too much about the weight of decapitated heads. Because "Stuart Little" is mostly pretty boring, the Old Millennials also discuss Quarantine Movies from the 80s and 90s. We nominate movies that evoke the feeling of living through a worldwide pandemic. Some of the choices seem pretty obvious (thanks for nothing, Lazy Tyler), but we also discuss the prospects of future episodes on the likes of "The Breakfast Club" and "Matilda." It's our final episode in our 2020 Animal Series of Old Millennials Remember Movies! Also discussed in this episode: Blow the Man Down (2020) Missing Link (2019) Killing Them Softly (2012) Double Indemnity (1944) The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946) Charmed reboot TV series Check out related past episodes of Old Millennials Remember Movies Unbreakable - episode 30 - 2000 Small Soldiers - episode 39 - 1998 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey - episode 75 - 1993    

 Stuart Little – ep76 – 1999 plus Quarantine Movies | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:05:56

Have you ever read "Stuart Little," the classic children's book by E.B. White? It's... not how you remember it. Let's just be honest here: "Charlotte's Web" is E.B. White's masterpiece. "Stuart Little" is weird. Old Millennials Remember Movies host Angela Yoshiko discusses reading the book to her children recently, and why the kids thought it was totally stupid. Truthfully, the Old Millennials don't recall seeing the 1999 CGI/live-action hybrid film version of "Stuart Little," which adapts almost nothing from the original book. The names are the same. There's a boat and a car. That's about it. Once you know what's in that original book though, you'll understand why screenwriter M. Night Shyamalan (yes, really!) chose to ignore it all. Stuart Little and Stuart Little 2 Old Millennials Remember Movies podcast Angela and Tyler talk about "Stuart Little" and the sequel "Stuart Little 2," both featuring the voice of Michael J. Fox and live-action performances from Geena Davis (hey gurrrl), Hugh Laurie (who is actively working on his Dr. House voice across both films) and little JOHNNY LIPNICKI, the little kid from "Jerry Maguire" who knew too much about the weight of decapitated heads. Because "Stuart Little" is mostly pretty boring, the Old Millennials also discuss Quarantine Movies from the 80s and 90s. We nominate movies that evoke the feeling of living through a worldwide pandemic. Some of the choices seem pretty obvious (thanks for nothing, Lazy Tyler), but we also discuss the prospects of future episodes on the likes of "The Breakfast Club" and "Matilda." It's our final episode in our 2020 Animal Series of Old Millennials Remember Movies! Also discussed in this episode: Blow the Man Down (2020) Missing Link (2019) Killing Them Softly (2012) Double Indemnity (1944) The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946) Charmed reboot TV series Check out related past episodes of Old Millennials Remember Movies Unbreakable - episode 30 - 2000 Small Soldiers - episode 39 - 1998 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey - episode 75 - 1993    

 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey – ep75 – 1993 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:12:05

If a "wise" old Golden Retriever tells you to leave the ranch and venture into the wilderness, don't listen to him. He's stupid. "Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey" is a Disney remake of the 1963 animal adventure, itself based on a book. But who cares about all that? This one has Marty McFly voicing a rambunctious dog who spouts pop culture references with reckless abandon. Look, we love this movie, but the language logic here will hurt your brain. Our three heroes - Chance (Michael J. Fox), Sassy (Sally Field) and senile Shadow (Don Ameche) speak to each other in English and make countless references to distinctly human experiences. They know about Godzilla and McNuggets and all sorts of other things. BUT they also don't understand what their human family members say to them, and they completely miss the reason why they're temporarily left at the farm with Jean Smart. How does that happen?! Either they understand human English or they don't! You can't have it both ways, MOVIE! End rant. Old Millennials Remember Movies "Homeward Bound" podcast "Homeward Bound" was a childhood favorite for many Old Millennials. Co-host Angela connects the movie to experiences with her own Golden Retriever. Even though her dog Penny ran INTO the side of a moving car one time, she was still smarter than Shadow. Shadow spends the whole movie lecturing Chance about not knowing anything. Hey, Shadow! You're a big dumb idiot for thinking you should traverse a mountain range with a domesticated cat and a pup who doesn't like to be called chicken (that's a joke for you "Back to the Future" fans). The cat goes over a waterfall, Shadow looks for her for five minutes then goes about his merry way. MONSTER. That being said, aren't we sad when Shadow falls in the hole? And the hill scene at the end. Tears! So many tears! Tyler and Angela go on their own incredible journey as they discuss "Homeward Bound" - the latest installment in our animal series! By "incredible journey," we mean "talk about the doggy and kitty movie." Also discussed on this episode: Rocketman (2019) Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (2019) Hair (1979) The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005) Property Brothers: Buying and Selling (a TV series that LIES!) Check out these related past episodes of "Old Millennials Remember Movies" Roar - episode 73 - 1981 101 Dalmatians - episode 74 - 1996 The Lion King - episode 47 - 1994

 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey – ep75 – 1993 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:12:05

If a "wise" old Golden Retriever tells you to leave the ranch and venture into the wilderness, don't listen to him. He's stupid. "Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey" is a Disney remake of the 1963 animal adventure, itself based on a book. But who cares about all that? This one has Marty McFly voicing a rambunctious dog who spouts pop culture references with reckless abandon. Look, we love this movie, but the language logic here will hurt your brain. Our three heroes - Chance (Michael J. Fox), Sassy (Sally Field) and senile Shadow (Don Ameche) speak to each other in English and make countless references to distinctly human experiences. They know about Godzilla and McNuggets and all sorts of other things. BUT they also don't understand what their human family members say to them, and they completely miss the reason why they're temporarily left at the farm with Jean Smart. How does that happen?! Either they understand human English or they don't! You can't have it both ways, MOVIE! End rant. Old Millennials Remember Movies "Homeward Bound" podcast "Homeward Bound" was a childhood favorite for many Old Millennials. Co-host Angela connects the movie to experiences with her own Golden Retriever. Even though her dog Penny ran INTO the side of a moving car one time, she was still smarter than Shadow. Shadow spends the whole movie lecturing Chance about not knowing anything. Hey, Shadow! You're a big dumb idiot for thinking you should traverse a mountain range with a domesticated cat and a pup who doesn't like to be called chicken (that's a joke for you "Back to the Future" fans). The cat goes over a waterfall, Shadow looks for her for five minutes then goes about his merry way. MONSTER. That being said, aren't we sad when Shadow falls in the hole? And the hill scene at the end. Tears! So many tears! Tyler and Angela go on their own incredible journey as they discuss "Homeward Bound" - the latest installment in our animal series! By "incredible journey," we mean "talk about the doggy and kitty movie." Also discussed on this episode: Rocketman (2019) Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (2019) Hair (1979) The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005) Property Brothers: Buying and Selling (a TV series that LIES!) Check out these related past episodes of "Old Millennials Remember Movies" Roar - episode 73 - 1981 101 Dalmatians - episode 74 - 1996 The Lion King - episode 47 - 1994

 101 Dalmatians – ep74 – 1996 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:04:30

If Disney remakes don't scare you, no evil thing will. Years before Disney went bananas with live-action remakes of their animated classics, the Mouse House recruited Glenn Close and a bunch of dogs to update the 1961 classic about a nice old lady who just wants to own a nice coat. Okay, so she wants the coat made out of dalmatian puppy fur, so doggy parents Pongo and Perdita must recruit a small army of farm animals to stop that crazy Cruella de Vil from making what will obviously be a very ugly coat. Building up its pedigree, "101 Dalmatians" adds John Hughes-penned pratfalls in the style of "Home Alone," Jeff Daniels as an "independent video game developer" and two bumbling henchman played by Dr. House and Ron Weasley's Dad. Old Millennials Remember '101 Dalmatians' podcast A holiday hit back in 1996, the live-action "101 Dalmatians" isn't quite as infuriating as the Disney remakes that would come later. For the most part, real animals are used (minus a few awful shots of 90s-era CGI), and they don't speak, which immediately elevates the viewing above your standard "Air Buddies" adventure. Tyler and Angela discuss Glenn Close's go-for-broke performance and whether the film's rescue mission in the second half works without the animals talking to each other as the do in the original. We also try to figure out the character of Nanny, played by "Dennis the Menace" superstar Joan Plowright. She's a nanny? For a family with no kids? A live-in housekeeper? A dogsitter? A weird old lady with the power to identify pregnant dogs just by looking into their eyes? What are you doing here, Nanny?! You're making us nervous. At least Cruela de Vil makes her intentions clear. Also discussed in this episode: Strangers on a Train (1951) Laura (1944) The Clapper (2017) Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019) The Land of Steady Habits (2018)

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