Radical Research Podcast show

Radical Research Podcast

Summary: Join hosts Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn in a bi-weekly conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of left-field rock and metal music.

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 Episode 27 – Fall Into Overdrive: Spiral Architect’s Tech-Metal Masterwork | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:13:10

A Skeptic’s Universe is what happens when student becomes master. Spiral Architect’s school years were spent in obscurity, honing their craft, learning their lessons, keeping their noses to the grindstone. In 1998 they began work on their master’s thesis, and in early 2000, upon publication, earned a spot on the lonely pedestal of top-tier tech metal. While owing debts to Watchtower, Fates Warning, Psychotic Waltz, Sieges Even, Toxik and Cynic, the young Norwegians upstaged them all with a most vicious merging of high-test progressive metal, bubbling fusion ferocity, and laboratory-borne aural pathogens. Music cited, in order of appearance:“Spinning” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000) “Excessit” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Moving Spirit” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Occam’s Razor” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Insect,” two passages (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Cloud Constructor” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Conjuring Collapse,” two passages (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Adaptability” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Fountainhead” (A Skeptic’s Universe, 2000)“Prelude to Ruin,” two passages (A Skeptic’s Universe, Japanese version bonus track, 2000) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 27

 Episode 26 – It’s Weird Being a Bob: NoMeansNo FTW | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:40:03

Angular, adventurous, and apocalyptic in nearly equal shares, few bands scratch the collective itches of Radical Research like Victoria, British Columbia’s Nomeansno. From their punky beginnings to the nuanced terror of their mature work, Nomeansno trafficked some of the most dangerous and dexterous rock music of the ’80s and ’90s. Accompanied by venomous libretti – Rob Wright May be responsible for rock music’s most articulate extrapolation of Hannah Arendt’s theory of the Banality of Evil – Nomeansno summoned a heady din of seething, twisting, mongrel-music. Peerless in a peer-friendly world, Nomeansno takes the road never traveled. Note I: Caveat! We talk for 7 or 8 minutes at the beginning of this episode about drummer Vinnie Colaiuta before we get into Nomeansno. Note II: Due respect to Mama, Sex Mad, The Worldhood of the World (As Such) and Dance of the Headless Bourgeoisie. All Nomeansno albums are recommended by Radical Research! Note III: Rob Wright is the man. For a long time, he looked like Phil Donohue…and when he was raging on stage, singing with sardonic malice and playing bass like a god, it was a fantastic visual, both hilarious and terrifying. Music cited, in order of appearance:“The End of All Things” (Wrong, 1989)“Victory” (Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed, 1988)“It’s Catching Up” (Wrong, 1989)“Ghosts” (0+2=1, 1991)“I See a Mansion in the Sky” (All Roads Lead to Ausfahrt, 2006)“Forget Your Life” (The Day Everything Became Nothing, 1988)“Real Love” (Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed, 1989)“0+2=1” (0+2=1, 1991)“The Day Everything Became Nothing” (The Day Everything Became Nothing, 1988)“Teresa, Give Me That Knife” (Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed, 1988)“The Tower” (Wrong, 1989)“Under the Sea” (One, 2000)“Everyday I Start to Ooze” (0+2=1, 1991) “Mary” (0+2=1, 1991)“Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed” (Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed, 1989)“The River” (Why Do They Call Me Mr. Happy?, 1993)“Bitch’s Brew” (One, 2000)Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 26

 Episode 25 – Pytten’s Chamber Music: Black Metal in Grieghallen | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:25:29

Pytten’s Chamber Music: Black Metal in Grieghallen As the ground began to swell in early ‘90s Norway, a shadowy figure known to metal fans only as “Pytten” (ne Eirik Hundvin) ensconced himself in Bergen’s Grieghallen Studio and began to document the work of the country’s Young Turks. In this frontier territory, Pytten used the cavernous spaces of Grieghallen to create a miasmic, atmospheric sound that would establish the production aesthetics for the emergent global black metal movement. For its 25th episode, Radical Research examines the morphology of Pytten’s work across a ten year span, as well as his cooperation with some of black metal’s most emblematic artists. Note I: We so appreciate our Sponsor, Lamentations of the Flame Princess, and urge you to go deep with their various RPGs! Get Frostbitten and Mutilated at a Triumphant Discount:https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.php?discount=9ff813a5db Note II: There isn’t much interview documentation or footage on Pytten, but here’s a great video that reveals some details we weren’t aware of at the time we recorded this episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvQLSigwF2U Note III: Pytten, much like English producer, Colin Richardson, was dragged into the world of extreme music rather innocently. His first production, for Bergen’s Old Funeral, began as a favor to one of the band members’ fathers. Solid dad move. Note IV: As we mention in our conversation, Pytten played bass in several rock bands in the ‘80s. Apropos of this episode, he also contributed fretless bass to Enslaved’s “Yggdrasil,” from their classic 1994 album, Frost, confirming his mettle as both producer and practitioner. Music cited, in order of appearance:Old Funeral, “Skin and Bone“ (Abduction of Limbs, 1990 demo)Burzum, “Det Som Engang Var” (Hvis Lyset Tar Oss, 1993)Mayhem, “Life Eternal” (De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, 1994)Emperor, “The Burning Shadows of Silence” (In the Nightside Eclipse, 1994)Hades, “Hecate (Queen of Hades)” (…Again Shall Be, 1994)Immortal, “Moonrise Fields of Sorrow” (Battles in the North, 1995)Borknagar, “Vintervredets Sjelesagn” (Borknagar, 1996)Gorgoroth, “Destroyer” (Destroyer, or About How to Philosophize with the Hammer, 1998)Aeternus, “Warrior of the Crescent Moon” (…And So the Night Became, 1998)Trelldom, “Slave Til En Kommende Natt” (Til Et Annet…, 1998)Mork Gryning, “Maelstrom Chaos” (Maelstrom Chaos, 2001)Enslaved, “The Cromlech Gate” (Monumension, 2001)episode 26 preview: Nomeansno, “All Lies” (Wrong, 1989)Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 25

 Episode 24 – This is the Ritual of Divination: Nasty Savage ’87/’88 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 58:15

Emerging from the swampy wastes of Florida, Nasty Savage created a body of work built on the inimitable vocals of Ronnie Galetti (aka Nasty Ronnie), hammering percussion, and a harmonic guitar language that has yet to be replicated. This episode of Radical Research takes a focused look at the band’s most feverishly creative period, represented by 1987’s Indulgence LP and 1988’s Abstract Reality EP. Neither thrash nor power metal nor prog, these two pieces of music vibrate at a pitch all their own, but have influenced artists who occupy a broad space of the heavy metal spectrum. Join us as we disinter these savage gems and apply the RR scalpel. And remember: You Snooze, You Lose! Note I: Nasty Savage was among the first metal bands to popularize the use of Morrisound Studio in Tampa, Florida, which would come to be known as the crucible of the then-primordial Florida Death Metal scene. Note II: We briefly mention the cover art that attends the two subject albums, rendered by Lewis VanDercar. Your Radical Research hosts are passionate advocates of visual surrealism and VanDercar is one of the form’s most unsung practitioners. You are urged, should you be so inclined, to investigate the man’s work. Note III: You could do way worse than buy this thing right now: https://www.discogs.com/Nasty-Savage-Indulgence-Abstract-Reality/release/3063475Note IV: And you could do plenty worse than checking out LotFP’s RPG, Towers Two, with a special discount — at this link only — for Radical Research listeners: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.php?discount=96d8ca0feNote V: The steady band lineup of Galetti/Meyer/Austin/Beeson had trouble keeping a bass player for any length of time. The bassists on Indulgence and Abstract Reality were Dezso Istvan Bartha and Chris Moorhouse (RIP), respectively. Hail. Music cited, in order of appearance:“Stabbed in the Back” (Indulgence, 1987)“Divination” (Indulgence, 1987)“Indulgence” (Indulgence, 1987)“Inferno” (Indulgence, 1987)“Hypnotic Trance” (Indulgence, 1987)“Incursion Dementia” (Indulgence, 1987)“Distorted Fanatic” (Indulgence, 1987)“?” (Indulgence, 1987)“Abstract Reality” (Abstract Reality, 1988)“Eromantic Vertigo” (Abstract Reality, 1988)“You Snooze, You Lose” (Abstract Reality, 1988)“Unchained Angel” (Abstract Reality, 1988) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 24

 Episode 23.5 – Mystery Snippets | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 09:28

This game originates from one Jeff plays semi-regularly with our pal Tim Hammond, where CD-Rs fly back and forth between the Boros (States and Greens), and one has to puzzle out the other’s mystery tracks. It’s been an effective way to both discover new stuff and learn about things to avoid. This episode Jeff and Hunter play mystery tunes for each other. We’ll likely repeat this point-5 feature on occasion, so if we’re keeping score, it’s Jeff 1, Hunter 0. But maybe Hunter gets .5 for his guess of…oh wait, it’s a secret.Music cited, in order of appearance:sorry…nothing to see here…move along, you lookyloos!

 Episode 23 – What the Hell is Art Rock? | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:08:59

The possibly despicable term “art rock” is where pop, prog & rock meet, with a generous layer of quirk embedded throughout. Art rock is pop without restraint, prog with good table manners, rock stretching its creative fibers beyond the norm. And yet, gray areas abound! In episode 23 of Radical Research, we offer an hour-long survey of several artists in this realm: Crack the Sky, Be Bop Deluxe, Godley & Creme, Split Enz and Max Webster. Leaping off from the platform built by the Beatles, David Bowie, Roxy Music, 10cc and Queen, we crash-land onto beguiling terrain. Note I: Other than the featured artists & foundational art rock gods mentioned above, more bands we recommend not featured in this episode: Alan Parsons Project, City Boy, Brian Eno (1973-1977), Phil Manzanera, Citizen Band, Angel (1975-1976), Manfred Mann’s Earth Band (1977-1980), Buggles, Japan, Sparks, Tubes, Eddie Jobson/Zinc, and even select Cheap Trick tunes. Blue Oyster Cult also intersect with this family of bands. And there are more… Note II: We’re proud to be sponsored for 2019 by Lamentations of The Flame Princess, Weird Fantasy Role Playing! We encourage you to check out their award-winning (and sometimes banned!) products here: www.lotfp.com/RPG/ Music cited, in order of appearance:Cheap Trick, “High Priest of Rhythmic Noise” (All Shook Up, 1980)Crack the Sky, “Ice” (Crack the Sky, 1975)Crack the Sky, “Nuclear Apathy” (Safety in Numbers, 1978)Be Bop Deluxe, “Sister Seagull” (Futurama, 1975)Be Bop Deluxe, “Kiss of Light” (Modern Music, 1976)Godley & Creme, “The Sporting Life” (L, 1978)Godley & Creme, “I Pity Inanimate Objects” (Freeze Frame, 1979)Split Enz, “Crosswords” (Dizrythmia, 1978)Split Enz, “In the Wars” (1980 b-side)Max Webster, “Toronto Tontos” (Max Webster, 1976)Max Webster, “Battle Scar” (Universal Juveniles, 1980)Blue Oyster Cult, “Hungry Boys” (Cultosaurus Erectus, 1980)Episode 24 preview: Nasty Savage, “Abstract Reality” (Abstract Reality, 1988) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 23

 Episode 22 – Weeping Suns & Churning Seas: An Examination of Pyogenesis’ Twinaleblood | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:10:23

It would be inaccurate to say that Germany’s Pyogenesis is underrated because, in fact, they have hardly ever been rated at all. Over the course of their career – which is still in process – Pyogenesis worked across a wide swath of genres, including death/doom and alternative metal, before settling on a mostly-unsuccessful foray into pop-punk. The 22nd installment of Radical Research dedicates most of its time to the band’s finest piece of music, 1995’s inscrutably-titled, Twinaleblood. Our 70-minute conversation digs in deeply to the album’s daring mosaic of sounds and styles, which ranges from the Type O Negative grandeur of “Undead” to the hooky alternative rock of “Weeping Sun.” The album was an island in 1995 and remains so in 2018, bearing the visionary mark. Note I: Immense appreciation to RR listener Giorgos Ketigenis for supplying mp3s of the early demo and 7 inch tracks. Note II: Hunter knows The Archaic Course is a Borknagar album and not an Arcturus one. We both get excited and lose our minds a little when it comes to discussing the best performances of vocalist Simen Hestnaes. Incidentally, Jeff believes Simen’s performance on Arcturus’s Arcturian is one of the best in metal history. And there’s your Norwegian metal reference for this episode. Note III: Way back in episode 4 (Disharmonic Orchestra) we discuss the interesting heritage of the laugh in metal music. Listener and doggone brilliant observationist Forrest Pitts reminded us about Tim Asmodeus’s laugh on Pyogenesis song “In the End.” It’s not in the part we sample this episode — we had already recorded — but it’s absolutely worth noting. Haw haw haw! Please keep the laugh-spotting coming, people. Might be a cool subject for a point-5 episode at some juncture. Note IV: Tim was also in a band called G.U.T. at the same time Pyogenesis was getting started. We wanted to mention that but conversation took us elsewhere. They were nuts. Check it out if you dare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFvUB-y4Lz4 Music cited, in order of appearance: “Considering the Majesty of Doom” (Ode to the Churning Seas of Nar-Mataru demo, 1991)“Lowland of Impiety” (Sacrificious Profanity 7”, 1992)“Still Burn in Fire” (Ignis Creatio, 1992)“In the End” (Waves of Erotasia, 1994)“Fade Away” (Sweet X-Rated Nothings, 1994)“Undead” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Twinaleblood” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Weeping Sun” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Every Single Day” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Abstract Life” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Those Churning Seas” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“God Complex” (Twinaleblood, 1995)“Mutz Umst Erben” (Twinaleblood bonus track, 1995)“Supavenus” (Twinaleblood, 1995) “Love Nation Sugarhead” (Love Nation Sugarhead – EP, 1996) episode 23 preview: Crack the Sky, “Virgin…No” (Animal Notes, 1976)

 Episode 21 – Who is the Freak Now? Regurgitating OLD | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:27:18

Meet the creatures Plotkin & Dubin, instigators of some of the most beguiling music ever beamed to Earth from a  New Jersey-shaped quasar. Like the guy in the petri dish on the Musical Dimensions… album cover, your puzzled Radical Research hosts consider the bizarre landscape before them and dive into the peculiar tumult of OLD.  Note I: We can only assume “sleastak,” from the album title The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, is a reference to Sleestaks, an extra-dimensional reptile race from 1970s Saturday morning show, Land of the Lost. Note II: We briefly mention Khanate, a post-OLD endeavor of Plotkin & Dubin, but the wealth of material and collaborations James Plotkin became involved in after OLD’s demise is impressive and worth mentioning. First is Flux, whose 1997 album, Protoplasmic, was a direct successor to the trail followed on OLD’s Formula. Not to mention membership in the short-lived Khlyst, supportive roles with Scorn and Namanax, and collaborations with Mick Harris, K.K. Null, Mark Spybey, and many other specimens. Note III: Jeff said there’s nothing exclusive on the Grindcrusher compilation. Not entirely true: the version of Carcass’s “Exhume to Consume” is different than the Symphonies of Sickness version. Either way, Grindcrushergoes with us to our graves. Note IV: We love Duran Duran (ref. “Marzuraan” intro). We own and listen to 21 Duran Duran releases between the two of us. (19 of those are Jeff’s)  NoteV: Discogs Dot Com. Buy or Die. Music cited, in order of appearance:“Peri Cynthion” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993)“Total Hag” (Old Lady Drivers, 1988)“Old Ladies Always Break Their Hips” (Old Lady Drivers, 1988)“Cocaine” (Old Lady Drivers, 1988)“Outlive” (Lo Flux Tube, 1991)“Citient Null” (Lo Flux Tube, 1991)“Marzuraan”(Lo Flux Tube, 1991)“Who Are You” (Masters of Misery – Black Sabbath: An Earache Tribute, 1992)“Two of Me (Parts One and Two)” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993)“Freak Now” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993)“Happy Tantrum” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993)“Last Look” (Formula, 1995)“Break (You)” (Formula, 1995)“Thug” (Formula, 1995)“Z.U.” (Lo Flux Tube, 1991)Episode22 preview: Pyogenesis, “Abstract Life” (Twinaleblood, 1995)  Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 21

 Episode 20 – Wolf’s Lair Abyss: Answer & Announcement | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 51:18

From the dark past, in the light of freezing moons and through funeral fog, Mayhem reappeared in 1997, under cover of night and to relatively little fanfare. Wolf’s Lair Abyss, the band’s first release since 1994’s epochal De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, reveals a fiercer, future-forward approach to Mayhem’s trademark hailstorm black metal. Time has been kind to this EP and so your Radical Research hosts have pulled out the cuneiform in order to decipher symbols of bloodswords. Note 1: With this EP, we see the reappearance of two former Mayhem members, Maniac and Necrobutcher. This lineup would go on to record two full-length albums, 2000’s black-tech masterpiece, Grand Declaration of War, and 2004’s steely Chimera. Note 2: The EP’s final track, “Symbols of Bloodswords,” features a chord progression that would become a motivic device on Grand Declaration of War. Radical Research suggests a back-to-back listen for maximum effect. Music cited, in order of appearance: “From the Dark Past” (De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, 1994) “De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas” (De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, 1994) “The Vortex Void of Inhumanity” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “I Am Thy Labyrinth” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Fall of Seraphs” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Ancient Skin” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Symbols of Bloodswords” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “A Grand Declaration of War” (Grand Declaration of War, 2000) “Completion in Science of Agony (pt. II of II)” (Grand Declaration of War, 2000) episode 21 preview: OLD, “Backwards Through the Greedo Compressor” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 20

 Episode 19 – The Unquietness of Fleurety | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:16:39

Goodbye clarity, hello obfuscation… Norway’s other post-black metal duo, perhaps dwelling deeper in obscure shadows than Solefald… we hail Fleurety’s dedication to the dark arts and… which craft? All the ones that bring metal to the most precarious of left-field edges. So bizarre that it makes complete sense. We enthusiastically endorse their mission. Note I: Of all our favorite high school Latin teachers who are also committed metal fans, our favorite has to be Chris Ayers. We are grateful for his help with the Latin translations/meanings in this episode. Chris also has the rare distinction of having attended a listening party for DVC’s Molecular Shadow in Florida in 1992. Note II: The Inquietum CD is the yellowest in either of our collections. It is also a mandatory Fleurety document. Buy it here: https://www.discogs.com/Fleurety-Inquietum/release/10711416 Music cited, in order of appearance: “Descent Into Darkness” (Ingentes Atque Decorii Vexilliferi Apokalypsis 7”, 2009, recorded 2004/05) “Profanations Beneath the Bleeding Stars” (A Darker Shade of Evil 7”, 1994) “Absence” (January 1995 demo) “Fragmenter Av En Fortid” (Min Tid Skal Komme, 1995) “Englers Piler Har Ingen Brodd” (Min Tid Skal Komme, 1995) “I Saw Claws” (Last-Minute Lies, 1999) “Face in a Fever” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Shotgun Blast” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Barb Wire Smile” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Summon the Beasts” (Evoco Bestias 7”, 2011, recorded 2008) “Degenerate Machine” (Et Spiritus Meus Semper Sub Sanguinantibus Stellis Habitabit 7”, 2013, recorded 2009/10) “Consensus” (two moments, Fragmenta Cuinsvis Aetatis Contemporaneae 7”, 2017, recorded 2011-2015) “The Science of Normality” (The White Death, 2017) “Future Day” (The White Death, 2017) “Facets” (Last-Minute Lies, 1999) episode 20 preview: Mayhem, “Ancient Skin” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 19

 Episode 18 – Do You Hear Solar Music? Grobschnitt’s Cosmic Fantasia | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 48:39

From a kernel to a cosmos. Over the course of a decade and beyond, Germany’s Grobschnitt twisted and bent and stretched a piece of sound that would be known as “Solar Music.” An alchemical collision of Prog, Krautrock, psychedelia, and uncanny theater, “Solar Music” represents a fascinating evolutionary journey and, particularly in its live iterations, reveals a band at the height of its powers. Radical Research dispenses with the Prominence and aims to get to the Core of the matter. Note I: We have to thank Tom Phillips for turning us on. Without him, we wouldn’t know “Solar Music,” and if we didn’t know “Solar Music,” we’d be malnourished. Hail Tom. Note II: If you want to dive in, we recommend these fine releases: https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-Solar-Music-Live/release/7026856 https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-The-History-Of-Solar-Music-1/release/1957738 https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-Ballermann/release/7026664 Music cited, in order of appearance: “Solar Music” (live in Berlin, 1977) “Sun Trip (On the Way)” (Grobschnitt, 1972) “Solar-Music, Part 1” (Ballermann, 1974) “Golden Mist” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) “Otto Pankrock” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) “Solar Music III” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) four moments from Warburg performance, 1978 four moments from Munster performance, 1979 final fade, from Warburg, 1978 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 18

 Episode 17.5: Permeable Lines – A Dangerous Dance with Inspiration | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 10:59

The second in an occasional series of brief ambushes. With this mini-episode, we ponder and marvel at similarities between a certain few musical passages. Prompted by our previous episode on Afflicted, we compare/contrast moments of uncanny similarity, one of which is too close for comfort. Coincidence or rip-off? We’re not judging. But you can… Music cited, in order of appearance: Afflicted, “Rising to the Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) My Dying Bride, “The Cry of Mankind” (The Angel and the Dark River, 1995) Solefald, “Philosophical Revolt” (The Linear Scaffold, 1997) Metallica, “For Whom the Bell Tolls” (Ride the Lightning, 1984) Bathory, “Home of Once Brave” (Hammerheart, 1990) Angel Witch, “Angel of Death” (Angel Witch, 1980) Manilla Road, “Dreams of Eschaton” (Crystal Logic, 1983) for all episodes, blog, and playlists: www.radicalresearch.org

 Episode 17 – Take the Bröms Dose: The Works of Afflicted | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:08:31

Prolific for a brief few years, with curious beginnings and a mostly ignored ending, Afflicted’s supernova burned brightly at its peak. That peak, Prodigal Sun, is the essential cornerstone of Afflicted’s output and is explored in depth here. Psychedelic, transcendent left-field death metal lunacy from far beyond. Note I: As we talk about Afflicted’s 7” era in this episode, we discuss an insane haul both of us made at Manifest Records in Charlotte, NC back in 2003. In the hauls, Hunter bought Primordial’s A Journey’s End, original vinyl pressing, for $4. It’s now going for around $90 on Discogs.com. Jeff’s best score was Mortem’s Slow Death 7”, bought for $3, currently going for around $85 on Discogs. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Consumed in Flames” (as Afflicted Convulsion) (Beyond Redemption demo, 1990) “Viewing the Obscene” (Ingrained 7”, 1990) “Prodigal Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Harbouring the Soul” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “In Years to Come” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Astray” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Rising to the Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Spirit Spectrum” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Consumed in Flames” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Ivory Tower” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Dawn of Glory” (Dawn of Glory, 1995) “I Am Vengeance” (Dawn of Glory, 1995) RR18 preview: Grobschnitt, “Solar Music I“ (Solar Music – Live, 1978) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 17

 Episode 16 – Synth Whores | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 55:04

Few things in life get the hosts of Radical Research as excited as the squishy, otherworldly sounds of the analog synthesizer. For our 16th episode, a special detour from our typical musings, we sort through the decades in search of some of the deepest, wildest, most thrilling synthesizer sounds in the rock and metal kingdoms. So, please, meet us at the wormhole and tag along for this investigation into radical, electronic sound. Note I: Kim Rantala, whose playing is featured here on Amorphis’ “The Orphan,” is also an accomplished accordion player and professional DJ. We’re happy that he opted for the Moog on Elegy. Note II: Hunter sounds like he’s underwater throughout this episode. We apologize. We would love to buy him a decent but affordable preamp for better quality recording on his laptop. We do take Paypal donations if you want to help: paypal.me/rrpodcast. Regardless, expect this issue to be fixed by next episode. Note III: The following link doesn’t cover deeply technical aspects of our favorite brand of synthesizer, the Moog; instead it captures a wonderful, more emotional aspect of Bob Moog as an innovator, father and unintentional role model. Check out this fantastic Ted Talk featuring Bob’s daughter, Michelle Moog-Koussa: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG_PYTsSSAM Note IV: When you’re a whore, you gotta have more. If you enjoy this episode, you’re in luck. There are simply too many iconic synthesizer moments to wrap into a single episode, so, rest assured, we’ll revisit this, one of our very favorite topics, in a follow-up future episode. Music cited, in order of appearance: Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, “Wind” (Glorified Magnified, 1972) Museo Rosenbach, “Zarathustra, b) Il Re Di Leri” (Zarathustra, 1973) Genesis, “Riding the Scree” (two moments) (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, 1974) Blue Oyster Cult, “Flaming Telepaths” (Secret Treaties, 1974) Goblin, “Wild Session” (Profondo Rosso, 1975) Epidaurus, “Andas” (Earthly Paradise, 1977) Gary Numan, “Conversation” (The Pleasure Principle, 1979) Amorphis, “The Orphan” (Elegy, 1996) Paraxism, “Fear” (.Xism Excursion, 1996) Ulver, “The Future Sound of Music” (Perdition City, 2000) Jethro Tull, “My God” (Aqualung, 1971) RR 17 preview: Afflicted, “Viewing the Obscene” (Ingrained 7”, 1990) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 16

 Episode 15 – The Breed is Still Beyond: Roadrunner’s Tech Metal Trinity | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:12:12

Can you sense them? The ghosts? Quiet yourself for a moment. They hang in the air and whisper in our ears. They taunt us with memories of a golden age. Listen closely and you can hear the spectral voice: “1993.” They mock the sterility and cannibalism of contemporary metal and remind us of a single day that produced three works of heavy metal futurism: Dimensions, Spheres, and Focus. Radical Research heeds the call and crosses the threshold. Do you dare? Note I: The ending of Cynic’s “How Could I?,” which concludes this episode, is derived from an earlier song intended for the Focus album, “Pleading for Preservation.” In the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, which we discuss, the band scrapped the song, which can only be heard on what is known as the “Roadrunner Demo” (1991). Note II: So that “How Could I?” could end this episode the only way it should end, we elected to not preview our next episode. Radical Research 16, Synth Whores, will be a rapid-fire examination (a la episode 5, Bad-Ass Fusion Decapitations) of some of our favorite synthesizer moments, drawing from the prog and metal worlds, and even one specimen from the almighty Gary Numan. Be there or be hip. Music cited, in order of appearance: Cynic, “Textures” (Focus, 1993) Believer, “Gone” (Dimensions, 1993) Believer, “Dimentia” (Dimensions, 1993) Believer, “What Is But Cannot Not Be” (Dimensions, 1993) Pestilence, “Multiple Beings” (Spheres, 1993) Pestilence, “Personal Energy” (Spheres, 1993) Pestilence, “Demise of Time” (Spheres, 1993) Cynic, “Celestial Voyage” (Focus, 1993) Cynic, “I’m But a Wave To…” (Focus, 1993) Cynic, “How Could I?” (Focus, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Gentle Giant to Gigan, Goblin to Gorguts, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 15

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