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Radical Research Podcast

Summary: Join hosts Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn in a bi-weekly conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of left-field rock and metal music.

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 Episode 20 – Wolf’s Lair Abyss: Answer & Announcement | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 51:18

From the dark past, in the light of freezing moons and through funeral fog, Mayhem reappeared in 1997, under cover of night and to relatively little fanfare. Wolf’s Lair Abyss, the band’s first release since 1994’s epochal De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, reveals a fiercer, future-forward approach to Mayhem’s trademark hailstorm black metal. Time has been kind to this EP and so your Radical Research hosts have pulled out the cuneiform in order to decipher symbols of bloodswords. Note 1: With this EP, we see the reappearance of two former Mayhem members, Maniac and Necrobutcher. This lineup would go on to record two full-length albums, 2000’s black-tech masterpiece, Grand Declaration of War, and 2004’s steely Chimera. Note 2: The EP’s final track, “Symbols of Bloodswords,” features a chord progression that would become a motivic device on Grand Declaration of War. Radical Research suggests a back-to-back listen for maximum effect. Music cited, in order of appearance: “From the Dark Past” (De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, 1994) “De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas” (De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, 1994) “The Vortex Void of Inhumanity” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “I Am Thy Labyrinth” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Fall of Seraphs” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Ancient Skin” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “Symbols of Bloodswords” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) “A Grand Declaration of War” (Grand Declaration of War, 2000) “Completion in Science of Agony (pt. II of II)” (Grand Declaration of War, 2000) episode 21 preview: OLD, “Backwards Through the Greedo Compressor” (The Musical Dimensions of Sleastak, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 20

 Episode 19 – The Unquietness of Fleurety | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:16:39

Goodbye clarity, hello obfuscation… Norway’s other post-black metal duo, perhaps dwelling deeper in obscure shadows than Solefald… we hail Fleurety’s dedication to the dark arts and… which craft? All the ones that bring metal to the most precarious of left-field edges. So bizarre that it makes complete sense. We enthusiastically endorse their mission. Note I: Of all our favorite high school Latin teachers who are also committed metal fans, our favorite has to be Chris Ayers. We are grateful for his help with the Latin translations/meanings in this episode. Chris also has the rare distinction of having attended a listening party for DVC’s Molecular Shadow in Florida in 1992. Note II: The Inquietum CD is the yellowest in either of our collections. It is also a mandatory Fleurety document. Buy it here: https://www.discogs.com/Fleurety-Inquietum/release/10711416 Music cited, in order of appearance: “Descent Into Darkness” (Ingentes Atque Decorii Vexilliferi Apokalypsis 7”, 2009, recorded 2004/05) “Profanations Beneath the Bleeding Stars” (A Darker Shade of Evil 7”, 1994) “Absence” (January 1995 demo) “Fragmenter Av En Fortid” (Min Tid Skal Komme, 1995) “Englers Piler Har Ingen Brodd” (Min Tid Skal Komme, 1995) “I Saw Claws” (Last-Minute Lies, 1999) “Face in a Fever” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Shotgun Blast” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Barb Wire Smile” (Department of Apocalyptic Affairs, 2000) “Summon the Beasts” (Evoco Bestias 7”, 2011, recorded 2008) “Degenerate Machine” (Et Spiritus Meus Semper Sub Sanguinantibus Stellis Habitabit 7”, 2013, recorded 2009/10) “Consensus” (two moments, Fragmenta Cuinsvis Aetatis Contemporaneae 7”, 2017, recorded 2011-2015) “The Science of Normality” (The White Death, 2017) “Future Day” (The White Death, 2017) “Facets” (Last-Minute Lies, 1999) episode 20 preview: Mayhem, “Ancient Skin” (Wolf’s Lair Abyss, 1997) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 19

 Episode 18 – Do You Hear Solar Music? Grobschnitt’s Cosmic Fantasia | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 48:39

From a kernel to a cosmos. Over the course of a decade and beyond, Germany’s Grobschnitt twisted and bent and stretched a piece of sound that would be known as “Solar Music.” An alchemical collision of Prog, Krautrock, psychedelia, and uncanny theater, “Solar Music” represents a fascinating evolutionary journey and, particularly in its live iterations, reveals a band at the height of its powers. Radical Research dispenses with the Prominence and aims to get to the Core of the matter. Note I: We have to thank Tom Phillips for turning us on. Without him, we wouldn’t know “Solar Music,” and if we didn’t know “Solar Music,” we’d be malnourished. Hail Tom. Note II: If you want to dive in, we recommend these fine releases: https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-Solar-Music-Live/release/7026856 https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-The-History-Of-Solar-Music-1/release/1957738 https://www.discogs.com/Grobschnitt-Ballermann/release/7026664 Music cited, in order of appearance: “Solar Music” (live in Berlin, 1977) “Sun Trip (On the Way)” (Grobschnitt, 1972) “Solar-Music, Part 1” (Ballermann, 1974) “Golden Mist” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) “Otto Pankrock” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) “Solar Music III” (Solar Music – Live, 1978) four moments from Warburg performance, 1978 four moments from Munster performance, 1979 final fade, from Warburg, 1978 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 18

 Episode 17.5: Permeable Lines – A Dangerous Dance with Inspiration | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 10:59

The second in an occasional series of brief ambushes. With this mini-episode, we ponder and marvel at similarities between a certain few musical passages. Prompted by our previous episode on Afflicted, we compare/contrast moments of uncanny similarity, one of which is too close for comfort. Coincidence or rip-off? We’re not judging. But you can… Music cited, in order of appearance: Afflicted, “Rising to the Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) My Dying Bride, “The Cry of Mankind” (The Angel and the Dark River, 1995) Solefald, “Philosophical Revolt” (The Linear Scaffold, 1997) Metallica, “For Whom the Bell Tolls” (Ride the Lightning, 1984) Bathory, “Home of Once Brave” (Hammerheart, 1990) Angel Witch, “Angel of Death” (Angel Witch, 1980) Manilla Road, “Dreams of Eschaton” (Crystal Logic, 1983) for all episodes, blog, and playlists: www.radicalresearch.org

 Episode 17 – Take the Bröms Dose: The Works of Afflicted | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:08:31

Prolific for a brief few years, with curious beginnings and a mostly ignored ending, Afflicted’s supernova burned brightly at its peak. That peak, Prodigal Sun, is the essential cornerstone of Afflicted’s output and is explored in depth here. Psychedelic, transcendent left-field death metal lunacy from far beyond. Note I: As we talk about Afflicted’s 7” era in this episode, we discuss an insane haul both of us made at Manifest Records in Charlotte, NC back in 2003. In the hauls, Hunter bought Primordial’s A Journey’s End, original vinyl pressing, for $4. It’s now going for around $90 on Discogs.com. Jeff’s best score was Mortem’s Slow Death 7”, bought for $3, currently going for around $85 on Discogs. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Consumed in Flames” (as Afflicted Convulsion) (Beyond Redemption demo, 1990) “Viewing the Obscene” (Ingrained 7”, 1990) “Prodigal Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Harbouring the Soul” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “In Years to Come” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Astray” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Rising to the Sun” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Spirit Spectrum” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Consumed in Flames” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Ivory Tower” (Prodigal Sun, 1992) “Dawn of Glory” (Dawn of Glory, 1995) “I Am Vengeance” (Dawn of Glory, 1995) RR18 preview: Grobschnitt, “Solar Music I“ (Solar Music – Live, 1978) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 17

 Episode 16 – Synth Whores | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 55:04

Few things in life get the hosts of Radical Research as excited as the squishy, otherworldly sounds of the analog synthesizer. For our 16th episode, a special detour from our typical musings, we sort through the decades in search of some of the deepest, wildest, most thrilling synthesizer sounds in the rock and metal kingdoms. So, please, meet us at the wormhole and tag along for this investigation into radical, electronic sound. Note I: Kim Rantala, whose playing is featured here on Amorphis’ “The Orphan,” is also an accomplished accordion player and professional DJ. We’re happy that he opted for the Moog on Elegy. Note II: Hunter sounds like he’s underwater throughout this episode. We apologize. We would love to buy him a decent but affordable preamp for better quality recording on his laptop. We do take Paypal donations if you want to help: paypal.me/rrpodcast. Regardless, expect this issue to be fixed by next episode. Note III: The following link doesn’t cover deeply technical aspects of our favorite brand of synthesizer, the Moog; instead it captures a wonderful, more emotional aspect of Bob Moog as an innovator, father and unintentional role model. Check out this fantastic Ted Talk featuring Bob’s daughter, Michelle Moog-Koussa: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG_PYTsSSAM Note IV: When you’re a whore, you gotta have more. If you enjoy this episode, you’re in luck. There are simply too many iconic synthesizer moments to wrap into a single episode, so, rest assured, we’ll revisit this, one of our very favorite topics, in a follow-up future episode. Music cited, in order of appearance: Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, “Wind” (Glorified Magnified, 1972) Museo Rosenbach, “Zarathustra, b) Il Re Di Leri” (Zarathustra, 1973) Genesis, “Riding the Scree” (two moments) (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, 1974) Blue Oyster Cult, “Flaming Telepaths” (Secret Treaties, 1974) Goblin, “Wild Session” (Profondo Rosso, 1975) Epidaurus, “Andas” (Earthly Paradise, 1977) Gary Numan, “Conversation” (The Pleasure Principle, 1979) Amorphis, “The Orphan” (Elegy, 1996) Paraxism, “Fear” (.Xism Excursion, 1996) Ulver, “The Future Sound of Music” (Perdition City, 2000) Jethro Tull, “My God” (Aqualung, 1971) RR 17 preview: Afflicted, “Viewing the Obscene” (Ingrained 7”, 1990) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 16

 Episode 15 – The Breed is Still Beyond: Roadrunner’s Tech Metal Trinity | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:12:12

Can you sense them? The ghosts? Quiet yourself for a moment. They hang in the air and whisper in our ears. They taunt us with memories of a golden age. Listen closely and you can hear the spectral voice: “1993.” They mock the sterility and cannibalism of contemporary metal and remind us of a single day that produced three works of heavy metal futurism: Dimensions, Spheres, and Focus. Radical Research heeds the call and crosses the threshold. Do you dare? Note I: The ending of Cynic’s “How Could I?,” which concludes this episode, is derived from an earlier song intended for the Focus album, “Pleading for Preservation.” In the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, which we discuss, the band scrapped the song, which can only be heard on what is known as the “Roadrunner Demo” (1991). Note II: So that “How Could I?” could end this episode the only way it should end, we elected to not preview our next episode. Radical Research 16, Synth Whores, will be a rapid-fire examination (a la episode 5, Bad-Ass Fusion Decapitations) of some of our favorite synthesizer moments, drawing from the prog and metal worlds, and even one specimen from the almighty Gary Numan. Be there or be hip. Music cited, in order of appearance: Cynic, “Textures” (Focus, 1993) Believer, “Gone” (Dimensions, 1993) Believer, “Dimentia” (Dimensions, 1993) Believer, “What Is But Cannot Not Be” (Dimensions, 1993) Pestilence, “Multiple Beings” (Spheres, 1993) Pestilence, “Personal Energy” (Spheres, 1993) Pestilence, “Demise of Time” (Spheres, 1993) Cynic, “Celestial Voyage” (Focus, 1993) Cynic, “I’m But a Wave To…” (Focus, 1993) Cynic, “How Could I?” (Focus, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Gentle Giant to Gigan, Goblin to Gorguts, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 15

 Episode 14 – Northwest of Babylon: Candlemass 1998-1999 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:02:54

Had Leif Endling disbanded Candlemass after 1989’s Tales of Creation, he would have given enough to place his band in the halls of metal infamy. But the bassist pressed on, enduring lineup shifts, label hassles, and changing times, to eventually arrive in the late ‘90s at a most esoteric iteration of Candlemass. We immerse deeply in this era for Radical Research episode 14. Please join us somewhere in nowhere, northwest of Babylon, out there beyond the abstrakt sun… Note I: We would be remiss if we didn’t mention that Europe drummer Ian Haugland played on two Dactylis Glomerata songs (“Wiz,” “I Still See the Black”). We think highly of the first two Europe albums. Music cited, in order of appearance: Abstrakt Algebra, “Shadowplay” (Abstrakt Algebra, 1995) Abstrakt Algebra, “Blue Wizard” (II, unreleased 1997 album) Candlemass, “Dustflow” (Dactylis Glomerata, 1998) Candlemass, “Apathy” (Dactylis Glomerata, 1998) Candlemass, “Lidocain God” (Dactylis Glomerata, 1998) Candlemass, “Tot” (From the 13th Sun, 1999) Candlemass, “ARX/NG 891” (From the 13th Sun, 1999) Candlemass, “Galatea” (From the 13th Sun, 1999) Candlemass, “Container” (Wiz EP, 1998) Episode 15 preview: Believer, “Future Mind“ (Dimensions, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Rottrevore to Roxy Music, Albino Slug to Alchemist, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 14

 Episode 13 – Make No Mistake: The Rick Rubin A/B | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:18:04

There are no happy accidents or lucky mistakes in Rick Rubin productions. The legendary producer knows exactly what he wants and how to get the leanest, meanest performances from each artist he works with. In our examples, he wielded a decisive guiding hand in helping bands clean up their tendencies toward the wandering and erratic, leading to honed, definitive albums that became legendary. His greatest talent, perhaps, was that he might have changed these bands significantly, but never sapped them of their purest essence. Note I: About Rubin’s later work with Metallica and Black Sabbath, ie. “low hanging fruit”: Rubin was hired to get the band back on track after disaster (Death Magnetic, after St. Anger), or to sculpt a definitive-sounding record in a career’s late stages (Black Sabbath’s 13). Essentially a similar purpose to our featured examples, but the point is, by the mid ‘00s, Rubin was no longer plucking young metal or rock bands from relative obscurity and readying them for the big time. It’s an important point we felt wasn’t clarified very well in the episode. Music cited, in order of appearance: Slayer, “At Dawn They Sleep” (Hell Awaits, 1985) Slayer, “Post Mortem” (Reign in Blood, 1986) Samhain, “Lords of the Left Hand” (Samhain Grim sessions, 1986) Danzig, “Possession” (Danzig, 1988) The Cult, “Rain” (Love, 1985) The Cult, “Love Removal Machine” (Electric, 1987) Trouble, “Born in a Prison” (Run to the Light, 1987) Trouble, “Black Shapes of Doom” (Trouble, 1990) The Mars Volta, “Eunuch Provocateur” (Tremulant EP, 2002) The Mars Volta, “Eriatarka” (De-Loused in the Comatorium, 2003) Trouble, “The Sleeper” (Manic Frustration, 1992) Episode 14 preview: Abstrakt Algebra, “Bug Queen” (II, unreleased 1997 album) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From 10cc to Colosseum II, Into the Pandemonium to Burning Time, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 13

 Episode 12 – Out There: The Works of Mind Over Four | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:39:11

For our 12th installment, your intrepid hosts sift through time and dust in search of Orange County’s Mind Over Four. Bridging an unknown gulf between cutting edge alternative rock and hyperkinetic tech/prog metal, Mind Over Four was poised for a breakthrough to the mainstream. But the stars never aligned and Mind Over Four has mostly been forgotten. Radical Research celebrates the timelessness and innovation of the band’s first four albums and invites you to play Dante to our Virgil as we navigate the barriers and passages of Mind Over Four. Note I: If you like Mind Over Four, then “like” this: https://www.facebook.com/MindOverFour/ Note II: The snippet of “Ogre Battle” that closes this episode is from a 1990 record label sampler (The Goddess era). The beginning is clearly not from the Queen song — it’s the first emanations of “Phobos Y Damos,” which appeared half a decade later, on 1995’s divisive and career-capping Empty Hands. We find this all very interesting. Note III: For the Radical Research trainspotters: we mention an EKG monitor sound in MO4’s 1987 song, “Martin’s Song.” We also mention use of the same sound effect back in Episode 7, in My Dying Bride’s “The Whore, the Cook and the Mother.” Bonus points: once again, count the Voivod references. Note IV: Is this a tongue-twister? “Hunter Totally Tunes Roto Toms Too Tight” Music cited, in order of appearance: “Vernal Equinox” (demo, year unknown, probably 1987-88) “She Beams the Light” (Out Here, 1987) “God” (Out Here, 1987) “Pity” (Out Here, 1987) “Social Stature” (Mind Over Four, 1989) “Messiah” (Mind Over Four, 1989) “The Black Orgasm” (Mind Over Four, 1989) “Prayer for the Dying” (The Goddess, 1990) “Gemini” (The Goddess, 1990) “Airplanes” (The Goddess, 1990) “My Name is Nothing” (Half Way Down, 1993) “Jack the Throne” (Half Way Down, 1993) “Conscience of a Nation” (Half Way Down, 1993) “Retarded” (Empty Hands, 1995) “Paralyzed” (Empty Hands, 1995) “Ogre Battle” (On the Nineties Tip – Hear and Now, Caroline Sampler, 1990) Episode 13 preview: Danzig – “Possession” (Danzig, 1988) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Finch to Furbowl, Genesis to Pyogenesis, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 12

 Episode 11 — They Scream In Us Too: The Works of Carbonized | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:15:31

Death metal is very weird musick. It’s the rupturing and restructuring of musical tradition. At its best it offers otherworldly, phantasmagoric deliverance. We begin this episode hearing Carbonized in its embryonic stages as an exemplar of the peculiar Swedish death metal substrata, but in short time, they took the weirdness inherent in death metal and followed their muse to its logical (illogical?) end. Death, post-death, avant-garde, noise rock, progressive, eclectic…whatever you call it, Carbonized was a vanguard of musical abnormality for 7 strange years before sputtering to a screaming end. Note I: Count how many times we say “Voivod” in this episode. Note II: On second thought, maybe those cars on album covers 1 & 3 are supposed to be Rolls-Royces. Note III: Bagpipes are not accordions, and vice versa. We know this way better than we know cars. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Purified (From the Sulfur)” (For the Security, 1991) “Paradise Lost” (Au-To-Dafe demo, 1989) “Au-To-Dafe” (No Canonization, 7”, 1990) “Two Faces” (Recarbonized demo, 1990) “Euthanasia” (For the Security, 1991) “Blinded of the Veil” (For the Security, 1991) “Third Eye” (For the Security, 1991) “Monument” (For the Security, 1991) “Spanish Fly” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Night Shadows” (Disharmonization, 1993) “The Voice of the Slained Pig” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Confessions” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Spacecraft” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Circles” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Psychodelica” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Fever” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Purified (From the Sulfur)” (For the Security, 1991) Episode 12 preview: Mind Over Four, “Barriers and Passages” (Half Way Down, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Mr. Bungle to Moth Vellum, Manilla Road to Mekong Delta, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 11

 Episode 10 – Let Go and Let Ginn: A Ginncore Primer | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:55:28

The 10th installment of the Radical Research odyssey pries into the amorphous body of work that has been known to your hosts privately as “Ginncore.” Based around a loosely-connected confederacy of artists — mostly American and mostly active during the difficult-to-define ‘00s — Ginncore has come to embody for Messrs. Wagner and Ginn a cryptic and subversive narrative in modern rock’s often-blighted history. Over the course of two hours, your hosts examine the work of 9 artists, whose music often wrestles with the tensions between commercial ambition and the pursuit of rarified expression. In this shadowy space, deep hooks are draped over thorny time signatures and signal declares an alliance with noise. This is Ginncore and this time, it’s personal. Note 1: Hunter mentions during the discussion of Cave In’s epochal Jupiter the influence of several bands, such as Radiohead, Hum, and Failure. However, he fails to cite the title of Failure’s Fantastic Planet, which one would assume had a deep influence on Cave In. We urge you to check out that album, if you’ve not already done so. And, if you like it, we also think that you need to find a copy of Thought Industry’s Short Wave on a Cold Day. Note 2: We talk briefly about the vocal glories of Chino Moreno, which are not confined to Deftones. We also recommend checking out his work in Crosses, Team Sleep and Palms, which find him working in more understated contexts. Note 3: Rage For Order. Not Ginncore. But rules now, rules forever. Music cited, in order of appearance: Cave In, “Requiem” (Jupiter, 2000) Glassjaw, “Pink Roses” (Worship and Tribute, 2002) The Mars Volta, “Frances the Mute” (The Widow single, 2005) The Mars Volta, “Teflon” (Octahedron, 2009) Deftones, “Cherry Waves” (Saturday Night Wrist, 2006) Mew, “156” (Frengers, 2003) Mew, “The Zookeeper’s Boy” (And the Glass Handed Kites, 2005) Coheed and Cambria, “Ten Speed (Of God’s Blood & Burial)” (Good Apollo, I’m Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness, 2005) 3, “Amaze Disgrace” (Wake Pig, 2004) 3, “My Divided Falling” (The End is Begun, 2007) Dredg, “The Canyon Behind Her” (El Cielo, 2002) Dredg, “Ode to the Sun” (Catch Without Arms, 2005) Fair to Midland, “Golden Parachutes” (Arrows & Anchors, 2011) episode 11 preview: Carbonized, “Lord of Damnation” (Disharmonization, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Peter Hammill to PFM, Carbonized to Confessor, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 10

 Episode 9 – Panic Button at the Asylum: Semiramis, Corte dei Miracoli, Alphataurus | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:14:51

Rock Progressivo Italiano (RPI) was a remarkably fertile, prolific progressive rock movement of the 1970s. Italy’s compositional and performance acumen rivaled England’s more popular scene, and its output exceeded it. Your Radical Research hosts are mad for the stuff, and with our ninth episode, we pluck three of our favorite specimens from the ether and put them under the microscope. These albums by Semiramis, Corte dei Miracoli and Alphataurus also count among the many one-offs from Italy’s vast number of representatives – one and done, but hardly forgotten in these parts. Note I: We couldn’t help but mention other Italian prog greats in our discussion of these three. Since our skills in that language do not pay the bills, we thought it helpful to list some of the other bands/albums noted in the episode, all highly recommended: Il Balletto di Bronzo – Ys; Banco Del Mutuo Soccorso – Darwin; Biglietto per L’inferno – self-titled; Blocco Mentale – POA; Cherry Five – Cherry Five; New Trolls – Ut; Le Orme – Felona Y Serona; Metamorfosi – Inferno; PFM – Chocolate Kings; Osanna – Palepoli. And there are so many others. Music cited, in order of appearance: Semiramis, “Luna Park” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Uno Zoo Di Vetro” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Frazz” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Clown” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Corte Dei Miracoli, “…E Verra L’Uomo” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “Verso Il Sole” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “Una Storia Fiabesca” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “I Due Amanti” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Alphataurus, “Peccato D’Orgoglio” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “Dopo L’Uragano” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “La Mente Vola” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “Ombra Muta” (Alphataurus, 1973) Episode 10 preview: The Mars Volta, “Viscera Eyes” (Amputechture, 2006) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Seven Impale to Cherry Five, 3 to Mind Over Four, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 9

 Episode 8 – Strange Relief: The Works of Beyond Dawn | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:38:46

Join us on an extended tour through the curious world of Norway’s Beyond Dawn. For thirteen years, Beyond Dawn occupied a shadowy, distorted universe of their own making. Rather than scowl at the moon, Beyond Dawn chased phantoms through pitiless cityscapes and fairytale grottos in equal measure. An outlier even in a community of dissidents, Beyond Dawn created a realm where things are rarely as they appear. Note I: In this episode, we take a brief sidebar to wax romantic on the bass stylings of Hugh Stephen James Mingay, better known to metal enthusiasts as Skoll. If you’ve not done so, we encourage you to explore the man’s work in Ulver, Ved Buens Ende, and Arcturus. Even his work with the lesser known Fimbulwinter (Skoll appeared on their 1994 LP Servants of Sorcery) has its merits and paves the way for the comparably bass-forward Carpathian Forest LP, Black Shining Leather. Few metal bassists have ever approached the instrument with such lyricism. Note II: We apologize for the dodgy quality of some of the dialogue. We were having a lousy Internet connection on one end and a storm on the other. Still, we think the life-affirming optimism of Beyond Dawn’s music, or complete lack thereof, comes through loud and drear. Note III: Give it up and give in. Music cited, in order of appearance: “The Sound of Wings” (Heaven’s Dark Reflection, 1991 demo) “Strained, Down and Under” (Up Through the Linear Shades, 1993 7”) “Cold” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) “Clouds Swept Away the Colours” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) “As the Evening Falters, the Dogs Howl” (Pity Love, 1995) “Ripe as the Night” (Pity Love, 1995) “Resemblance” (Revelry, 1998) “Life’s Sweetest Reward” (Revelry, 1998) “Naked (How to Produce Honesty)” (In Reverie, 1999, recorded 1996) “Certain Qualities” (Electric Sulking Machine, 1999) “Fairy Liquid” (Electric Sulking Machine, 1999) “Far from Showbiz” (Frysh, 2003) “Bloody Comeback” (Frysh, 2003) “Severed Survival” (Autopsy, Severed Survival, 1989) “Severed Survival” (Frysh, 2003) “Chaosphere” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Corte Dei Miracoli to Carbonized, Yes to Nomeansno, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast, episode 8  

 Episode 7 – Wishful Dreaming: A Study of My Dying Bride’s Urban Detour | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:14:30

Wishful Dreaming: A Study of My Dying Bride’s Urban Detour Join Radical Research hosts Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn in a spirited discussion on the fifth album from English death/doom maestros My Dying Bride. 34.788%…Complete was met with quizzical confusion upon its release in 1998, but we feel it was always one of the band’s finest hours. We’re here to proffer evidence of its worth. As usual, we sweat the small stuff. Note I: Jeff forgot about 2004’s Songs of Darkness, Words of Light in the final minutes of our discussion. Unless that’s your favorite MDB album (and how could it be?), he begs forgiveness of that minor lapse. Music cited, in order of appearance: “The Whore, the Cook and the Mother” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “The Stance of Evander Sinque” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Der Uberlebende” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Heroin Chic” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Apocalypse Woman” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Base Level Erotica” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Under Your Wings and Into Your Arms” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Follower” (34.788%…Complete sessions, 1998) “God is Alone” (Symphonaire Infernus et Spera Empyrium, 1991) Episode 8 preview: Beyond Dawn, “Bygone” (Up Through the Linear Shades 7”, 1993) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 7 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Semiramis to Seven Impale, Mew to Melvins, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

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