Radical Research Podcast show

Radical Research Podcast

Summary: Join hosts Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn in a bi-weekly conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of left-field rock and metal music.

Join Now to Subscribe to this Podcast
  • Visit Website
  • RSS
  • Artist: Jeff Wagner & Hunter Ginn
  • Copyright: © 2018 Radical Research Podcast

Podcasts:

 Episode 11 — They Scream In Us Too: The Works of Carbonized | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:15:31

Death metal is very weird musick. It’s the rupturing and restructuring of musical tradition. At its best it offers otherworldly, phantasmagoric deliverance. We begin this episode hearing Carbonized in its embryonic stages as an exemplar of the peculiar Swedish death metal substrata, but in short time, they took the weirdness inherent in death metal and followed their muse to its logical (illogical?) end. Death, post-death, avant-garde, noise rock, progressive, eclectic…whatever you call it, Carbonized was a vanguard of musical abnormality for 7 strange years before sputtering to a screaming end. Note I: Count how many times we say “Voivod” in this episode. Note II: On second thought, maybe those cars on album covers 1 & 3 are supposed to be Rolls-Royces. Note III: Bagpipes are not accordions, and vice versa. We know this way better than we know cars. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Purified (From the Sulfur)” (For the Security, 1991) “Paradise Lost” (Au-To-Dafe demo, 1989) “Au-To-Dafe” (No Canonization, 7”, 1990) “Two Faces” (Recarbonized demo, 1990) “Euthanasia” (For the Security, 1991) “Blinded of the Veil” (For the Security, 1991) “Third Eye” (For the Security, 1991) “Monument” (For the Security, 1991) “Spanish Fly” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Night Shadows” (Disharmonization, 1993) “The Voice of the Slained Pig” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Confessions” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Spacecraft” (Disharmonization, 1993) “Circles” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Psychodelica” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Fever” (Screaming Machines, 1996) “Purified (From the Sulfur)” (For the Security, 1991) Episode 12 preview: Mind Over Four, “Barriers and Passages” (Half Way Down, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Mr. Bungle to Moth Vellum, Manilla Road to Mekong Delta, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 11

 Episode 10 – Let Go and Let Ginn: A Ginncore Primer | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:55:28

The 10th installment of the Radical Research odyssey pries into the amorphous body of work that has been known to your hosts privately as “Ginncore.” Based around a loosely-connected confederacy of artists — mostly American and mostly active during the difficult-to-define ‘00s — Ginncore has come to embody for Messrs. Wagner and Ginn a cryptic and subversive narrative in modern rock’s often-blighted history. Over the course of two hours, your hosts examine the work of 9 artists, whose music often wrestles with the tensions between commercial ambition and the pursuit of rarified expression. In this shadowy space, deep hooks are draped over thorny time signatures and signal declares an alliance with noise. This is Ginncore and this time, it’s personal. Note 1: Hunter mentions during the discussion of Cave In’s epochal Jupiter the influence of several bands, such as Radiohead, Hum, and Failure. However, he fails to cite the title of Failure’s Fantastic Planet, which one would assume had a deep influence on Cave In. We urge you to check out that album, if you’ve not already done so. And, if you like it, we also think that you need to find a copy of Thought Industry’s Short Wave on a Cold Day. Note 2: We talk briefly about the vocal glories of Chino Moreno, which are not confined to Deftones. We also recommend checking out his work in Crosses, Team Sleep and Palms, which find him working in more understated contexts. Note 3: Rage For Order. Not Ginncore. But rules now, rules forever. Music cited, in order of appearance: Cave In, “Requiem” (Jupiter, 2000) Glassjaw, “Pink Roses” (Worship and Tribute, 2002) The Mars Volta, “Frances the Mute” (The Widow single, 2005) The Mars Volta, “Teflon” (Octahedron, 2009) Deftones, “Cherry Waves” (Saturday Night Wrist, 2006) Mew, “156” (Frengers, 2003) Mew, “The Zookeeper’s Boy” (And the Glass Handed Kites, 2005) Coheed and Cambria, “Ten Speed (Of God’s Blood & Burial)” (Good Apollo, I’m Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness, 2005) 3, “Amaze Disgrace” (Wake Pig, 2004) 3, “My Divided Falling” (The End is Begun, 2007) Dredg, “The Canyon Behind Her” (El Cielo, 2002) Dredg, “Ode to the Sun” (Catch Without Arms, 2005) Fair to Midland, “Golden Parachutes” (Arrows & Anchors, 2011) episode 11 preview: Carbonized, “Lord of Damnation” (Disharmonization, 1993) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Peter Hammill to PFM, Carbonized to Confessor, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 10

 Episode 9 – Panic Button at the Asylum: Semiramis, Corte dei Miracoli, Alphataurus | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:14:51

Rock Progressivo Italiano (RPI) was a remarkably fertile, prolific progressive rock movement of the 1970s. Italy’s compositional and performance acumen rivaled England’s more popular scene, and its output exceeded it. Your Radical Research hosts are mad for the stuff, and with our ninth episode, we pluck three of our favorite specimens from the ether and put them under the microscope. These albums by Semiramis, Corte dei Miracoli and Alphataurus also count among the many one-offs from Italy’s vast number of representatives – one and done, but hardly forgotten in these parts. Note I: We couldn’t help but mention other Italian prog greats in our discussion of these three. Since our skills in that language do not pay the bills, we thought it helpful to list some of the other bands/albums noted in the episode, all highly recommended: Il Balletto di Bronzo – Ys; Banco Del Mutuo Soccorso – Darwin; Biglietto per L’inferno – self-titled; Blocco Mentale – POA; Cherry Five – Cherry Five; New Trolls – Ut; Le Orme – Felona Y Serona; Metamorfosi – Inferno; PFM – Chocolate Kings; Osanna – Palepoli. And there are so many others. Music cited, in order of appearance: Semiramis, “Luna Park” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Uno Zoo Di Vetro” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Frazz” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Semiramis, “Clown” (Dedicato a Frazz, 1973) Corte Dei Miracoli, “…E Verra L’Uomo” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “Verso Il Sole” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “Una Storia Fiabesca” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Corte Dei Miracoli, “I Due Amanti” (Corte Dei Miracoli, 1976) Alphataurus, “Peccato D’Orgoglio” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “Dopo L’Uragano” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “La Mente Vola” (Alphataurus, 1973) Alphataurus, “Ombra Muta” (Alphataurus, 1973) Episode 10 preview: The Mars Volta, “Viscera Eyes” (Amputechture, 2006) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Seven Impale to Cherry Five, 3 to Mind Over Four, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast episode 9

 Episode 8 – Strange Relief: The Works of Beyond Dawn | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:38:46

Join us on an extended tour through the curious world of Norway’s Beyond Dawn. For thirteen years, Beyond Dawn occupied a shadowy, distorted universe of their own making. Rather than scowl at the moon, Beyond Dawn chased phantoms through pitiless cityscapes and fairytale grottos in equal measure. An outlier even in a community of dissidents, Beyond Dawn created a realm where things are rarely as they appear. Note I: In this episode, we take a brief sidebar to wax romantic on the bass stylings of Hugh Stephen James Mingay, better known to metal enthusiasts as Skoll. If you’ve not done so, we encourage you to explore the man’s work in Ulver, Ved Buens Ende, and Arcturus. Even his work with the lesser known Fimbulwinter (Skoll appeared on their 1994 LP Servants of Sorcery) has its merits and paves the way for the comparably bass-forward Carpathian Forest LP, Black Shining Leather. Few metal bassists have ever approached the instrument with such lyricism. Note II: We apologize for the dodgy quality of some of the dialogue. We were having a lousy Internet connection on one end and a storm on the other. Still, we think the life-affirming optimism of Beyond Dawn’s music, or complete lack thereof, comes through loud and drear. Note III: Give it up and give in. Music cited, in order of appearance: “The Sound of Wings” (Heaven’s Dark Reflection, 1991 demo) “Strained, Down and Under” (Up Through the Linear Shades, 1993 7”) “Cold” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) “Clouds Swept Away the Colours” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) “As the Evening Falters, the Dogs Howl” (Pity Love, 1995) “Ripe as the Night” (Pity Love, 1995) “Resemblance” (Revelry, 1998) “Life’s Sweetest Reward” (Revelry, 1998) “Naked (How to Produce Honesty)” (In Reverie, 1999, recorded 1996) “Certain Qualities” (Electric Sulking Machine, 1999) “Fairy Liquid” (Electric Sulking Machine, 1999) “Far from Showbiz” (Frysh, 2003) “Bloody Comeback” (Frysh, 2003) “Severed Survival” (Autopsy, Severed Survival, 1989) “Severed Survival” (Frysh, 2003) “Chaosphere” (Longing for Scarlet Days, 1994 EP) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Corte Dei Miracoli to Carbonized, Yes to Nomeansno, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. This is Radical Research Podcast, episode 8  

 Episode 7 – Wishful Dreaming: A Study of My Dying Bride’s Urban Detour | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:14:30

Wishful Dreaming: A Study of My Dying Bride’s Urban Detour Join Radical Research hosts Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn in a spirited discussion on the fifth album from English death/doom maestros My Dying Bride. 34.788%…Complete was met with quizzical confusion upon its release in 1998, but we feel it was always one of the band’s finest hours. We’re here to proffer evidence of its worth. As usual, we sweat the small stuff. Note I: Jeff forgot about 2004’s Songs of Darkness, Words of Light in the final minutes of our discussion. Unless that’s your favorite MDB album (and how could it be?), he begs forgiveness of that minor lapse. Music cited, in order of appearance: “The Whore, the Cook and the Mother” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “The Stance of Evander Sinque” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Der Uberlebende” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Heroin Chic” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Apocalypse Woman” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Base Level Erotica” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Under Your Wings and Into Your Arms” (34.788%…Complete, 1998) “Follower” (34.788%…Complete sessions, 1998) “God is Alone” (Symphonaire Infernus et Spera Empyrium, 1991) Episode 8 preview: Beyond Dawn, “Bygone” (Up Through the Linear Shades 7”, 1993) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 7 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Semiramis to Seven Impale, Mew to Melvins, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

 Episode 6: Band in the Trees — Among the Ruins of Die Kreuzen | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:22:28

Band in the Trees: Among the Ruins of Die Kreuzen Episode 6 of Radical Research finds your intrepid hosts deep-diving into the discography of Milwaukee’s cult heroes, Die Kreuzen. Over the span of a decade, Die Kreuzen created four records that propose a hostile challenge to easy categorization. Their discography tests the boundaries of punk and metal and accounts for one of the most fascinating morphologies in all of rock music. As always, we invite you to join us in our immersion and wander the ruins of Die Kreuzen. Note I: The band’s Gone Away EP (1989) is given the hushed-tone treatment. Though we prefer physical media, the iTunes version also includes the Germs and Wire covers we discuss. So does the long out-of-print 1990 CD version. Here’s the salient point: buy this music. RR is not a forum for sanctimony, but the artists who sweat and bleed for the music we love deserve remuneration for their toil. Note II: Guitarist Brian Egeness left the band on April 1, 1992, resulting in what is possibly the saddest April Fool’s day ever. Note III: Jeff mentions admiration for ‘70s Aerosmith in this episode, and how “terrible” the later stuff is. For the record, we both place 1982’s Rock in a Hard Place in the upper echelon of great Aerosmith albums. Done With Mirrors (1984) is merely mediocre. After that it gets ugly. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Fighting” (Die Kreuzen, 1984) (full song) “Live Wire” (Die Kreuzen, 1984) “All White” (Die Kreuzen, 1984) “Man in the Trees” (October File, 1986) “It’s Been So Long” (October File, 1986) “Among the Ruins” (October File, 1986) “Elizabeth” (Century Days, 1988) “The Bone” (Century Days, 1988) “Number Three” (Century Days, 1988) “Gone Away” (Gone Away EP, 1989) (two parts) “Land of Treason” (Pink Flag/Land of Treason 7”, 1990) “Wish” (Cement, 1991) “Deep Space” (Cement, 1991) “Over and the Edge” (Cement, 1991) “Halloween” (Century Days, 1988) “Rumors” (Die Kreuzen, 1984) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 6 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Captain Beyond to Beyond Dawn, Atheist to Believer, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

 Episode 5.5: Calling Dr. Morpheus – The Kiss/Nuclear Death Convergence | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 07:10

Radical Research 5.5 is the first in an occasional series of brief ambushes. Super-trivial stuff that’s too fun, weird and/or interesting to ignore, but undeserving of a full episode. For Radical Research diehards only! Music cited in order of appearance: Nuclear Death – “A Dark Country” (Carrion for Worm, 1991) Nuclear Death – “Lurker in the Closet: A ‘Fairy’ Tale” (Carrion for Worm, 1991) Nuclear Death – “Cathedral of Sleep” (Carrion for Worm, 1991) Nuclear Death – “Homage to Morpheus” (Carrion for Worm, 1991) Kiss – “Calling Dr. Love” (Rock and Roll Over, 1976) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 5.5 We love Nuclear Death. We love Kiss. We hope Gene Simmons attempts legal action.

 Episode 5: Ten Bad-Ass Fusion Decapitations | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 48:41

Ten blasts of springtime joy before the scorch of summer. This is the Radical Research strain of fusion, corralling some of the baddest asses within the larger prog/jazz/fusion/rock heliosphere. From NYC giants Mahavishnu Orchestra and Return to Forever, we veer into decidedly deadly territory through explorations in early Utopia, England’s high-end nutz Brand X, and Italy’s utterly withering Area. These and others are the sons borne of Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew (1970) and the gonzo spazz-jazz moments in King Crimson’s “21st Century Schizoid Man” (1969). Note I: ‘Ten Bad-Ass Fusion Decapitations’ will likely be the most notes you’ll ever have to process on any Radical Research episode. Not for the faint of heart. Note II: We hope you purchase any music you hear on this episode that you’d like to delve into further. Outlets such as Discogs, Laser’s Edge, Amazon and your local record store all depend on your patronage (except maybe Amazon, they’ll be okay without you). Online snacking tubes or corrupt streaming services interrupt music with advertising and pay artists a pittance for their work, if they pay anything at all. Music cited in order of appearance Mahavishnu Orchestra – “ Vital Transformation” (The Inner Mounting Flame, 1971) Horacee Arnold – “Puppett of the Seasons” (Tales of the Exonerated Flea, 1974) Return to Forever – “Captain Senor Mouse“ (Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy, 1973) Utopia – “The Ikon” (Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, 1974) Brand X – “DMZ” (Do They Hurt?, 1980) Colosseum II – “Wardance” (Wardance, 1977) Happy the Man – “New York Dreams Suite” (Happy the Man, 1977) Finch – “A Passion Condensed” (Beyond Expression, 1976) Area – “Arbeit Macht Frei” (Arbeit Macht Frei, 1973) King Crimson – “The Law of Maximum Distress: Part I,” 11/15/73, Zurich, Switzerland King Crimson – “21st Century Schizoid Man,” 10/4/14, San Francisco, CA This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 5 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats provide the richest, most rewarding experiences and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Ulver to Utopia, Crack the Sky to Last Crack, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

 Episode 4: Where the Weirdos are Dishing it Out – Disharmonic Orchestra | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 01:23:33

Episode 4 of Radical Research explores the surreal work of Austrian metalunatics, Disharmonic Orchestra.* Our conversation exposes the psychic tensions and psychedelic grottos of this extraordinary band, one whose music was ignored largely during its heyday and continues, for the most part, to be bereft of appreciation. From the gnashing death/grind of their early output to the strange emotions and nuanced geometry of their mature work, your hosts ask that you listen with perishing passion and immerse yourselves in the addicted seas of Disharmonic Orchestra. Note I: D’Orch’s third album, Pleasuredome, was released by Steamhammer Records. This has Disharmonic Orchestra keeping unlikely company with Fozzy, Dokken, and Judas Priest. Truth is always stranger than fiction, folks. Note II: According to the estimable Metal Archives, Austria has given the world 1,147 metal bands. Hunter was able to name 4 of them. *D’Orch (pr. “dork”) for short. Music cited, in order of appearance: “Inexorable Logic” (Expositionsprophylaxe, 1990) “Accelerated Evolution” (Expositionsprophylaxe, 1990) “Sick Dishonourableness” (Expositionsprophylaxe, 1990) “Disappeared with Hermaphrodite Choirs”(Expositionsprophylaxe, 1990) “Perishing Passion” (Not to be Undimensional Conscious, 1992) “Groove” (Not to be Undimensional Conscious, 1992) “The Return of the Living Beat” (Not to be Undimensional Conscious, 1992) “Time Frame” (Not to Be Undimensional Conscious, 1992 — three moments) “The Silence I Observe” (Pleasuredome, 1994) “Pleasuredome “ (Pleasuredome, 1994 — full song) “Nine9Nine” (Ahead, 2002) “Mindshaver” (Ahead, 2002) “Rascal in Me” (Fear of Angst, 2016) “Down to Earth” (Fear of Angst, 2016) Episode 5 preview: Utopia, “Mister Triscuits” (Another Live, 1975) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 4 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats provide the richest, most rewarding experiences and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Fleurety to Friendship Time, Die Kreuzen to David Sylvian, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

 Episode 3 | Breathless Silence Sped to Violence: Gnidrolog, Supersister, Artcane | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:12:40

Episode 3 of Radical Research covers three progressive rock bands from the glorious ‘70s era that often don’t come up in the usual ‘70s prog conversations. But they should, and this is our little way of correcting that. Please drop your prejudices and Yes albums, just for a little while, and explore further: meet Gnidrolog (UK), Supersister (Netherlands) and Artcane (France). Note: We wonder in the episode what an original vinyl copy of Gnidrolog’s In Spite of Harry’s Toe-Nail might go for. Jeff researched: looks like about $100 minimum for a copy in acceptable condition. Note II: Artcane’s sole album, Odyssee, was released on the Philips label, the same Philips that produces or has produced electronics, lighting and health care products. What a world. Note III: Hunter gets all unctuous up in this. Music cited, in order of appearance: Gnidrolog – “Long Live Man Dead” (In Spite of Harry’s Toe-Nail, 1972) Gnidrolog – “Snails” (In Spite of Harry’s Toe-Nail, 1972) Gnidrolog – “Time and Space” (In Spite of Harry’s Toe-Nail, 1972) Gnidrolog – “I Could Never Be a Soldier” (Lady Lake, 1972) Gnidrolog – “Social Embarrassment” (Lady Lake, 1972) entr’acte: Pink Floyd – “Alan’s Psychedelic Breakfast” (Atom Heart Mother, 1970) Supersister – “11/8” (Present From Nancy, 1970) Supersister – “Mexico” (Present From Nancy, 1970) Supersister – “Metamorphosis” (Present From Nancy, 1970) Artcane – “Novembre” (Odyssee, 1977) Artcane – “Artcane I” (Odyssee, 1977) episode 4 preview: Disharmonic Orchestra – “Introphylaxe” (Expositionsprophylaxe, 1990) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 3 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats provide the richest, most rewarding experiences and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Mr. Bungle to Mind Over Four, Carbonized to Comus, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

 Episode 2 | The Unorthodox Khaos of Dan Swanö | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:01:59

The second episode of Radical Research dives into the strange world of Sweden’s Dan Swanö. From his neo-prog roots in Unicorn to the way-left-of-center Karaboudjan, and bedrocks Edge of Sanity and Pan-Thy-Monium, we are usually in awe. Swanö has also been a crucial cog in the Katatonia and Opeth machines. He has approximately 24 other bands to his credit, and about 4 bazillion production/engineering/mixing/mastering credits. What have YOU done lately? Note: The proper Swedish pronunciation of Dan Swanö goes a little something like: Don Swan’-ya. Don’t worry about it. We prefer to say it just like every other American Swanö fan does. But hey, you Scandinavians, we know. Note II: We also know Pan-Thy-Monium vocalist Derelict (Roberth Karlsson) went on to membership in Scar Symmetry, but we here at Radical Research choose to ignore that fact. — Music cited, in order of appearance: Edge of Sanity – “Twilight” (Unorthodox, 1994) Pan-Thy-Monium – “The Battle of Geeheeb” (Khaooohs and Kon-fus-ion, 1996) Pan-Thy-Monium – “Khaoohs I” (Khaooohs, 1993) Karaboudjan – “Plan 714 Till Sydney“ (2001) (recorded 1996-97) Pan-Thy-Monium – “Behrial” (Khaooohs and Kon-fus-ion, 1996) This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 2 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by author and skylifter, Jeff Wagner, and the highly evolved brain of Hunter Ginn, also percussive summoning for tech-metal terrors Canvas Solaris. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats provide the richest, most rewarding experiences and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From Gentle Giant to Arcturus, Gorguts to Nomeansno, Chroma Key to Chrome, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums. semi-random bad-ass artrock clip for your ingestion: The Tubes “Space Baby” 1975 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuNJ7xPPzsU      

 Episode 1 | It Ulver Is | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 50:40

For the inaugural episode of Radical Research, we delve into the mysterious, magnificent William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1998), the fourth album by Norwegian shape-shifters Ulver. Note: The sound quality of RR1 isn’t exactly superb, especially Jeff’s mic in the intro. This was our first time in the lab. Our apologies. Our next two episodes are already recorded and edited; the improvements will be immediately noticeable. We also apologize for slaughtering the pronunciation of various surnames and nicknames in this episode. [‘It Ulver Is’ was recorded in September 2017] Note: We talk about the infamous “car picture” in relation to its use in the packaging of …The Marriage…, yet those who were howling in 1997 may recall that the same picture began circulating upon the release of Ulver’s previous album, Nattens Madrigal. We’re aware that some people will tie the car picture into the Nattens era, and that’s fair enough. It’s subversive hijinks from any perspective. Music cited, in order of appearance: “A Memorable Fancy, Plates 6-7” “A Memorable Fancy, Plate 15” “Proverbs of Hell, Plates 7-10” “A Song of Liberty, Plates 25-27” “The Argument, Plate 2” “Voice of the Devil, Plate 4” —- This is Radical Research Podcast, Episode 1 Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by author Jeff Wagner and southern son Hunter Ginn (also drum design for tech-metal terrors Canvas Solaris). Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats provide the richest, most rewarding experiences and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. We believe music, truly great music, is worth more than we ever pay for it. From King Crimson to Ved Buens Ende, Pulsar to Pan-Thy-Monium, A Perfect Circle to Perfect Beings, Radical Research dissects the work of rock and metal’s most daring artists and albums.

Comments

Login or signup comment.