The Project Management Podcast show

The Project Management Podcast

Summary: Are you looking to improve your Project Management Skills? Then listen to The Project Management Podcast, a weekly program that delivers best practices and new developments in the field of project management. The more companies understand the importance of sound Project Management, the more will your skills be in demand. Project Management is the means used by companies today to turn their vision and mission into reality. It is also the driver behind transforming a business need into a business process. The Project Management Podcast™ looks at how project management shapes the business world of today and tomorrow. Find us on the web at http://www.project-management-podcast.com. The Project Management Podcast™ is a trademark of OSP International LLC. All other trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The Project Management Podcast™ and its RSS feed are copyright © by OSP International LLC 2005 - 2010. All rights reserved.

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Podcasts:

 Episode 428: Effective Meeting Leadership (Free) #PMOT | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Training : Kevin Wozniak and Cornelius Fichtner Got Meetings? This interview focuses on effective meeting management. It covers one of the project management basics that is most difficult to handle - managing stakeholders using different combinations of direct, dotted line, and influential management. This interview with Kevin Wozniak was recorded at the creative Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. In the interview we demonstrate how to effectively lead meetings and manage participants using various management styles and explain how to actively engage meeting attendees to participate in meetings in a valuable manner. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Coming Soon! Above are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Please subscribe to our Premium Podcast to receive a PDF transcript.

 Episode 427: How to Complete Your Projects 50% Faster (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Douglas Knutzen and Cornelius Fichtner What if you had to do your project in (near) half the time as previous projects, or be fired? What if your customer required you to do their project in (near) half the time to which you are accustomed or lose the business? Hear about the techniques (that can be applied to almost any type of project) that helped to meet these challenges and got the products successfully to market in record time. This interview with Douglas Knutzen was recorded at the inspirational Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. You'll hear about how to leverage scheduling, execution and team techniques to significantly increase speed on your projects, and (almost more importantly) how to lead project teams in high-pressure situations. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Douglas Knutzen: Hi, This is Doug Knutzen from Plexus Corporation. In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we will lever the scheduling, execution and team techniques to significantly increase speed on future projects. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the inspirational 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles. And I’m currently sitting here in Room 411A together with Doug Knutzen. Hello, Doug! Good afternoon! Douglas Knutzen: Good afternoon, Cornelius. Thanks for having me. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah! So the audience has just left. This is a beautiful, beautiful venue that they have given you. How was the presentation? Douglas Knutzen: It was really fun; it is a wonderful venue. I was really happy to be in the theater. The audience was great. I think we had about 200 people or so and I think it was well received. I think it went very well. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah, I came in at the tail end and lots of questions. Lots of questions came. Douglas Knutzen: Yeah, there were a lot of questions, very insightful questions. Cornelius Fichtner: Always a good sign. Douglas Knutzen: Yeah, I think so. Cornelius Fichtner: In the opening, I said: “We’re coming to you live from the inspirational 2018 PMI Global Conference.” You chose the adjective ‘inspirational’. Why is it inspirational? Douglas Knutzen: I think for two reasons. I think the two keynoters that we had this week particularly the gentlemen from the NFL, I’m sorry I can’t pronounce his last name. Cornelius Fichtner: Neither can I, yup! Douglas Knutzen: Who’s the magician, and had a great inspirational story there. He was just nothing short of fantastic and I think today’s speaker about the five generations and working through that, I thought he was very inspirational too. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah, I saw myself in those slides definitely. Douglas Knutzen: Yeah and they both did tremendously well. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah. Your presentation is called “Taking Your projects to Breathtaking Speed.” How did this presentation develop? Why are you talking on this topic? Douglas Knutzen: Yeah, that’s a great question. Overtime, there were two projects that went really well that were both under significant duress and both went really, really quickly, really crazy speeds and they had to do that because of the duress they were under. And when I went back and looked at it, they were from two different companies and I thought there must be some correlations here. It’s like doing a lessons learned if you will. There must be some correlations that allow us to kind of see what were the correlations between these two projects and that’s what led to sort of the development of this specific talk. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah, you said those two projects were under duress. What are some other more general reasons why we projec

 Episode 426: How to Ensure Long-Term Project Success (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Eleonore Pieper and Cornelius Fichtner Successful projects result in change. However, this transformation usually happens when the original project team is already disbanding, leaving the process largely unmanaged and stakeholders ill-equipped to use the deliverables as they were intended, diminishing the expected project impact and benefits. In this interview, we explore five strategies that project managers can easily incorporate into their project plans to put in place preventative and mitigation strategies that will lead to improved adoption of project results. This interview with Eleonore Pieper (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the diverse Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. We look at a scalable model of five strategies for change and discuss how to modify plans with specific tasks in the areas of communication, training, organizational design, sponsorship and HR management to ensure successful post-project transformation. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Eleonore Pieper: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we explore strategies that you can easily incorporate into your project plans in order to achieve improved adoption of project results. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the diverse 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles. And with me right now is Eleonore Pieper. Good afternoon! Eleonore Pieper: Good afternoon, Cornelius. Thanks for having me. Cornelius Fichtner: Absolutely! You already did your presentation earlier this morning right after the opening keynote presentation. How was it? Eleonore Pieper: I did, I did. I was pretty nervous. I really thought John, who did the keynote, was a hard act to follow that the set up was really great. I had a large audience, about 130 people in the room and everybody stayed pretty much until the bitter end. Lots of questions. Lots of interactions. So I kind of came out pretty stoked. Cornelius Fichtner: And you also had a technical issue? Eleonore Pieper: I did. For some reason, right in the middle of it, my slide deck started advancing for no apparent reason. So whatever gremlins were in the computer did their thing. Cornelius Fichtner: It is auto-advanced. Eleonore Pieper: Auto-advanced, it’s right. I think it must have been a setting like I don’t know kiosk setting or something in the presentation so I had to kind of flip back to keep on the slide I was still talking about and that was interesting. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah, and just by sheer coincidence, I sat at a lunch table with somebody who was at your presentation and about this technical issue they said, but she covered it flawlessly. So it’s all good. It’s all good. Eleonore Pieper: Big sigh of relief. I’m very happy to hear that, thank you. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah. So I’d like to go back to one word that we heard in my opening. I said: ‘We are coming to you live from the diverse 2018 PMI Global conference.’ You chose that adjective, diverse. Why did you choose that? Eleonore Pieper: Well I am from Dallas. I’ve been there for the last 20 years working as a project manager. In Dallas, I would say project management is very much a middle-aged white profession. And being out here seeing people from Africa, from India, from China, everywhere, women, men, young people, old people coming together talking about project management, that kind of global feeling, I’m normally missing in my business. And so to me, that’s really energizing and makes me very happy. Cornelius Fichtner: Your presentation is called “Life After Implementation”. Why did you choose that particular topic? Eleonore Pieper: It’s something that I

 Episode 425: Maximize Your Project's First 21 Days (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Sara Gallagher and Cornelius Fichtner The ink isn't even dry on your charter, but what if the seeds of project destruction have already been sown? The odds are not in our favor. The Project Management Institute (PMI)® reports that nearly 15% of projects are deemed failures. After years of helping companies "unstick" troubled projects, our guest knows that the first 21 days are critical to success. Learn how you can leverage them to beat the odds! This interview with Sara Gallagher (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the connecting Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. We look at the most common mistakes that project managers make in the first 21 days, how to correct them, and learn about critical but often overlooked objectives that must be achieved early related to project framing and team infrastructure. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Cornelius Fichtner: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, you’ll learn how to maximize your project’s first 21 days and avoid some of the common startup mistakes. Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I’m Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the connecting 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles, California. And with me right now is Sara Gallagher. Sara Gallagher: Hello! Cornelius Fichtner: Good afternoon and welcome back! Sara Gallagher: Thank you so much! Cornelius Fichtner: This is our second conference interview. Sara Gallagher: It is, yes! Cornelius Fichtner: Will you be presenting next year? Sara Gallagher: I hope so. Cornelius Fichtner: Oh good! Sara Gallagher: I hope to present every year because it is such a fun experience to come back year after year and see some of the same people over and over again. Cornelius Fichtner: What do you get out of it? Sara Gallagher: I get a lot. Number one, I obviously get the PDUs that everybody else gets, right? But more importantly, I always leave everyday of the conference with at least a couple of a-ha moments, something that just makes me think about my own project management practice in a new way. And I always leave with new friends. Cornelius Fichtner: The adjective that I used were coming to you live from the connecting 2018 Global Conference, that adjective is from you. Tell me why do you choose “connective”? Sara Gallagher: When I come to the PMI conference, I always feel that I make really meaningful professional relationships but also friends, you know. People from allover the world. I meet people from different industries. I meet fellow consultants who it’s always so fun to chat with about how they approach their work, how you help people solve their project problems. I just love it! Cornelius Fichtner: And to everybody out there who is not here, that’s what you are missing. Your presentation is called “Win the battle before it begins. How to maximize the first 21 days.” Why 21 days and is it business days or are we actually talking three weeks, calendar weeks? Sara Gallagher: So the number 21 has a special significance to me. It’s the story that I open a presentation with. It is an arbitrary number. What I’m really talking about is the first, let’s say, 10% of whatever your project link is, which is when you are building trust with the team, when you are scoping out your project, you are framing it up. You are making sure everyone understands the “why” of the project that you are doing. So for long projects, that might be more like 45 days. For short projects, I used a length of let’s say about a year. So 21 days is kind of how I arrived at that number. But for me the story comes from the very first project that I ever managed. Cornelius Fichtner: Oh okay! You mentioned it. We have to follow up

 Episode 424: Lean-Agile PMO (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Andy Burns and Cornelius Fichtner Slow PMO? In today’s “right now” business environment, “hurry up and wait” annual planning cycles won’t do! To be fit for purpose, PMO processes deliver value faster than the competition—continuously, and certainly not just annually. Lean agility delivers this winning velocity! Here's a diet to help lean out an overweight PMO. Transforming the heritage PMO takes insight, empiricism, and experience. This interview with Andy Burns (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the encouraging Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. The experience shared in this interview should inform those needing to deliver fast—before the competition! We compare and contrast the practices of the heritage PMO and the lean-agile PMO and illustrate a technique to tailor the PMO process. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Andy Burns: Hello! This is Andy Burns and in this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we are going on a diet. A diet to lean out and overweight PMO. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I’m Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the encouraging 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles. And with me right now is Andy Burns. Hello, Andy! Andy Burns: Hello, Cornelius and thank you so much for doing such a great service you did for project managers. Cornelius Fichtner: Well, thank you for sitting here with me. Two years in a row! We did one last year, right? Andy Burns: I think so, I think so. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah! Okay, so my question has to be: What are you going to present next year because we need to do an interview on that? Andy Burns: I’m doing more and more with portfolios and Lean and Agile so it will probably be there. Cornelius Fichtner: Alright! So your presentation is titled: Calorie Counting and the Lean-Agile PMO. Let me begin with somewhat of a challenging question, Lean-Agile PMO, those two things, Lean-Agile and PMO, they don’t seem to go together all too well in my head. Lean and Agile, that talks quick and fast and you know Lean and Agile, right? Whereas PMO, it’s like okay we are prescriptive. We have this methodology. You have to fill in these templates. It takes forever. Here’s a new rule and if you don’t do it our way, we’ll send an auditor. How do these two things mix together? Andy Burns: Well it’s very interesting because we found out that Agile itself doesn’t scale very well from small teams. We also found that PMO with their prescriptive nature are not very good at managing the flow of value through a business. And so there’s a school of thought, a group of people that has come together and said: Let’s Lean out the PMO. Let’s take some of this heavy-weight prescriptive documentation and process and let’s look at flow and let’s focus on getting business value to come out continuously. So we see an opportunity to have value come out immediately and compound like compounding interest in a bank account and we are incredibly encouraged by what we are seeing myself and several colleagues that are doing this for different companies. And so it is possible to take the traditional PMO and say: ‘Look at your practices and see if you can Lean them out. So I do have a bit of a recipe I’m going to share at the Congress on Monday and I’m incredibly excited to do that. Cornelius Fichtner: Right, and what are the qualities of a Lean-Agile PMO when you compare it to say a traditional PMO? Andy Burns: Well it really comes down to the definition of your work. If you think about our definition of a project, our traditional definition of a project, it’s a one-time endeavor to create a new service or a new product. And if you think about that, how can I

 Episode 423: Knowledge Management (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Benjamin Anyacho and Cornelius Fichtner By 2029, 76 million baby boomers will retire. And organizations, including yours, are losing knowledgeable employees due to retirement and a competitive labor market. With 50% employee turnover in 2016, this brain drain of historical proportions increases our vulnerability to loss of institutional knowledge and critical skill sets required to conduct our business. In this interview, we explore the trends, urgency, value, techniques, and how-to of knowledge management — the new competitive and comparative advantage for high performing organizations. This interview with Benjamin Anyacho (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the superb Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. In the interview we also discuss strategies for creating a knowledge management culture in your business environment and how to develop knowledgeable project teams. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Benjamin Anyacho: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we discover strategies for creating a knowledge management culture and your business environment and how to develop knowledge management project teams. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I’m Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the superb 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles. And with me right now is Benjamin Anyacho. Good afternoon, Benjamin! How are you doing? Benjamin Anyacho: Good afternoon, Cornelius! I’m doing fantastic. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah! So you already gave your presentation this morning on knowledge management. How did it go? How many people did attend? Benjamin Anyacho: Hundreds of people. It was intriguing and people were very impressed with the presentation and the delivery, the content, the richness of the content. I had so many people who are coming to take pictures with me. They made me a celebrity at the end of the presentation. But it was a very relevant subject that is rarely discussed. It’s part of the strategic PMI Triangle, is purely 100% strategic. So many people have very little information about knowledge management. So those who came were very impressed. Cornelius Fichtner: Why do you think it is very rarely discussed? Benjamin Anyacho: Yeah because it’s one of those subjects that is all over the place. People whom you think know about it have no knowledge or very little. One of the illustrations is I met with a group of executives to talk to them about knowledge management. One of them said: “Please forgive my ignorance. Is knowledge management not succession planning?” Actually, I told him, say: “It is like asking somebody: Is work breakdown structure not project management?” Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah, okay. Benjamin Anyacho: So knowledge management, succession plan is just a tool and a very little tool in the whole picture. And knowledge management is vast. It has different components, techniques. It’s bigger than just a succession plan. A succession plan is one of the tools but it goes beyond that. Cornelius Fichtner: So if you had to summarize it to give us a definition of what knowledge management is, how would you define it? Benjamin Anyacho: Knowledge management is according to many definitions, it has to be the ability to ease up a program. If I look and test a program that incorporates knowledge sharing, knowledge codification and knowledge management, okay? So in other words, knowledge management is the concept of articulating the knowledge asset of an organization and how to transfer that knowledge from the heart, from the hand of one employee to other employees and having fun doing it and creating new knowledge. Cornelius Fichtner: So this is beyond just project ma

 Episode 422: How NOT to Work 60-Hour Weeks (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam training : Kim Wasson and Cornelius Fichtner It's hard to juggle everything on your project. And just a glance at your company's project management methodology can make you despair about getting it all done. But if we take a page from agile development, adding tools from behavioral psychology to Pomodoro, and incorporating pragmatic prioritization, you’ll be able to build a personalized time management system that fits your own working style. Come out of this interview with a manageable system for yourself and the tools to help your team members manage their own time and priorities. This interview with Kim Wasson (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the exciting Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. In the interview we review the key components of a good time/priority management system, the smorgasbord of tools available, and we discuss how to create a tailored time management system and advise team members on ways to manage their time and priorities. Oh... also... below is an image of the time management system that got Cornelius so excited during the recording: Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Kim Wasson: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, I show you how not to work 60-hour weeks. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I’m Cornelius Fichtner. We are coming to you live from the exciting 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles, California. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: And with me right now here in the hallway is Kim Wasson. Hello, Kim! Kim Wasson: Hello, Cornelius! It’s nice to be with you again. Cornelius Fichtner: Yes, thank you. Another conference, another Podcast interview it seems. Kim Wasson: Indeed! I’ve switched directions a little bit this year talking about different things. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah so you’ve been speaking at quite a few number, how many is this that you are speaking? Kim Wasson: This is three. Cornelius Fichtner: This is the third! Oh! So I caught you at every single presentation. Kim Wasson: Yes, you caught me right at the beginning. Yes, because we talked before I started even coming to PMI. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah! How is this for you as a speaker? How much value does it bring to come here, speak, meet people? Kim Wasson: It’s actually quite valuable. The preparation for the conference gets better every year. There’s more support. They are more concise. They offer a lot more reviews and I love meeting people and I like to talk about the things that I talk about. Cornelius Fichtner: When I presented a few years back, I had to actually submit a white paper. Do they still require it now? Kim Wasson: They do not require that. Cornelius Fichtner: Okay. Kim Wasson: It was actually last year, they didn’t. The year before they did. It was quite a shock so I didn’t know I’d have to do it the year I did. I had to back up and write it down. Cornelius Fichtner: Right. So for anyone out there who’s interested in speaking at a PMI Conference, it is now much easier and more accessible. If you have a good topic and a good presentation, you can do it. Kim Wasson: Yes, it’s not that difficult. They have Toastmasters that you can review with and it’s very well done. People here are very nice. It’s nice to present here. People are supportive. Cornelius Fichtner: When is your presentation? Kim Wasson: Two o’clock today. Cornelius Fichtner: Two o’clock today. Any idea how many people have signed up? Kim Wasson: No! They don’t check. So I don’t know I might go into an empty room. It’s a different topic. The emotional intelligence that I talk on, the rooms are always packed because it’s such a hot topic. So we’ll see how this one. Cornelius Fichtner: So you said it. You’ve changed your focus a little bit.

 Episode 421: Maximize Career Advancement with Project Management Training (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam prep : Marie Spark and Cornelius Fichtner Do you want to take your career as a project manager to the next level? Yes? We have a suggestion for you: project management education. This interview with Marie Spark (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the energizing Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Well... Actually... it was recorded a couple days before at the PMI® LIM). In the interview, we see how adult education has changed in the past decade, what changes we can expect in the future, and how we project managers can (and should!) take advantage of various training opportunities in order to advance our careers. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Marie Spark: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, you’ll discover how to take your project management education to the next level. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I’m Cornelius Fichtner. We are coming to you live from the energizing 2018 PMI Global Conference in Los Angeles. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: And with me right now is Marie Spark. Good afternoon, Marie! Marie Spark: Good afternoon, Cornelius! Great to be here! Cornelius Fichtner: I cheated a little bit because I said that we are at the PMI Global Conference. We’re not yet at the conference. We are at the PMI Leadership Institute Meeting to be absolutely precise. It’s a couple of days before the conference actually starts. How is the LIM for you? Marie Spark: Oh, the LIM is fantastic. The Leadership Institute Meeting brings project managers from allover the world. I sat down at the table with people from Nigeria, Portugal and Vietnam and we had a great talk from people PMI Global and someone from Pixar relating project management to wonderful animated movies. How can you tap that? Cornelius Fichtner: Our topic is career advancement through project management training. What can out listeners expect to learn from our conversation? Marie Spark: Well, the world of project management training keeps changing in disruption just like everything else but the exciting thing is I think our listeners can think about going beyond the traditional bounds of what is learning and hopefully we can explore the possibilities in this conversation. Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah! Let’s take a step back and start at the very beginning. Marie Spark: Sure. Cornelius Fichtner: What is your background in project management and also in project management education? Marie Spark: Sure. So the funny thing on me is I am a full-time faculty member now in academics. But that is not where I started and I never would have guessed that I’d be here. So I was an IT project manager in banking and operations and I also is a Six Sigma Black Belt and I really fell into being in education after leaving my last job and suddenly realizing that my favorite thing I did was Six Sigma coaching. And thinking I would be in professional training to make a long story short, I am now the director of a project management program and I really enjoy the fact that I combine my professional background with education. Cornelius Fichtner: And what exactly it is that you do for that program and just you know for full disclosure it’s Golden Gate University. Marie Spark: Sure! It’s Golden Gate University. So I’m a professor of project management. I teach but I also on higher faculty. In a way, I am a project manager for the program because I get to figure out what courses we need to refresh, how we can change our program. And I do outreach. And when I come to events like PMI LIM, what I love is I get to network as part of my job to learn from others. Cornelius Fichtner: What are some of the changes that you are seeing in adult education? Marie Spark: Oh my goodness, like everyt

 Video Impressions from The 2018 PMI® Global Conference in Los Angeles | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: Unknown

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 Episode 419: Setting up a PMO in 100 Days (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam: PMP Exam training : Hussain Bandukwala, PMO Coach Is your company thinking about setting up a PMO and nobody, not even you, have the experience to do it? That is not a problem. Our guest today is Hussain Bandukwala (LinkedIn Profile). He is the organizer of the PMO Virtual Summit and PMOs are his passion. He writes and speaks about them. And in one of his articles he says that even if you’ve never done it before you can still set up a PMO in 100 days. We discuss how realistic this is, what skills a PMO leader needs, the mindset needed to do this in 100 days, and then we’ll take you phase by phase through the process of setting up your very own PMO in 100 days. PDU Tip This interview is 44:29 minutes long. This means that you can "legally" only claim 0.50 PDUs for listening to it, because in order to claim 0.75 PDUs the interview must be 45 minutes long. However... if you first listen to the interview and then also read the following article from Hussain about setting up a PMO in 100 days, then you can go ahead and claim 0.75 PDUs! Click to read the article Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Hussain Bandukwala: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we will set up a PMO in 100 days. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. This is Episode #419 and I am Cornelius Fichtner. Thank you for joining us. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: Is your company thinking about setting up a PMO and nobody, not even you, has the experience to do it? That’s not a problem. Our guest today is Hussain Bandukwala. He is the organizer of the PMO Virtual Summit and PMOs are his passion. He writes and speaks about them. And in one of his articles, he says that even if you’ve never done it before, you can still set up a PMO in 100 days. We discuss how realistic this is, what skills a PMO leader needs, the mindset needed to do this in 100 days and then we’ll take you phase by phase through the process of setting up your very own PMO in 100 days. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: Hello, Hussain and welcome to The Podcast! Hussain Bandukwala: Thank you so much, Cornelius! It’s great to be here! Cornelius Fichtner: In your bio on LinkedIn, you write the following: “I help aspiring and first-time project management office leaders succeed.” What is it that you personally like about PMOs? Hussain Bandukwala: You know, PMOs come in different shapes, sizes and personalities. There is no one size fits all and every time you go about setting up a PMO or rather every time you should go about setting up a PMO, you should really start from scratch. Try to really understand why the PMO is needed and then take it from there. Don’t try to set up a PMO that you may have seen someone set up somewhere else or done it yourself. Don’t try to just try to plug and play into your organization because there are very good chance that it’s not going to work. So having a lot of consulting background where doing the cycle was sort of second nature for me. Every time I went to a new client with a fresh big name, getting to learn new people, getting to understand what the current pain points were. Our current PMOs do just like that. Just that in itself is so fantastic. And then I think the way PMOs can have an impact from an organization, I think that’s just wonderful because if PMOs are done right, their goal much like other departments in an organization is to make sure that organization benefit its strategies successfully. Using project management as a tool forward to get there. So once all of those things get into action and then seeing the beauty about how PMOs and PMO leaders have that vantage point to see and touch everything within the organization and be able to successfully move the needle for it, I think it can be a very, very

 PMO Virtual Summit | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: A quick announcement and call to action to sign up for The PMO Virtual Summit at www.pmovirtualsummit.com

 Episode 418: Essential Business Management Skills (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: For Project Management Professional (PMP)® Students: PMP Exam Prep : All interview guests Last year at the Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Congress 2017 in Chicago, Illinois I recorded about a dozen interviews. They have all been published over the past year and you've probably heard some or all of them. But what you don't know is what happened once each interview was complete. I pressed the recording button one more time and asked each of my guests the following question: What business management skills are essential for today’s project manager if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations? And today you are going to get all the answers. In one nice mashup. Here are all the presenters in the order you will hear their answers Andy Kaufmann Betsy Stockdale Laszlo Retfalvi Justin Fraser Jen Pfaff Sarah Gallagher Kim Wasson Darryl Hahn Jeff Kissinger Niraj Kumar Oh, and spoiler alert... the answer that I received most often was "Flexibility". Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Cornelius Fichtner: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we introduce you to the essential business management skills that we project managers need in order to become more strategic. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. This is Episode #418 and I am Cornelius Fichtner. It’s good to have you with us. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: Last year at the PMI Global Conference in Chicago, I recorded about a dozen interviews. They have all been published over the past few months and you’ve probably heard some or all of them. But what you don’t know is what happened once each interview was complete because I pressed the recording button one more time and asked each of my guests the following question: “What business management skills are essential for today’s project managers if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?” And today, you are going to get all the answers that I have recorded in one nice mash-up. We begin with Andy Kaufmann who says that assertiveness is one of the keys to success. Cornelius Fichtner: Andy, what business management skills are essential for today’s project managers if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations? Andy Kaufmann: You know, I had a coaching client who is a director level at the time and he said to me. He goes: “Alright! So this is like summer, mid-year by next Spring. I need to be a Vice President.” And it surprised that he was so focused on title. Because most people maybe it’s more on pay or something else. But he goes: “I got to have that title by then.” So we talked about it that you can’t go in titled, but you can sometimes ask. For example: “I want to get there. What does it take to get there?” And then you have to do it. You can just you know say it. By the way, he got it and it wasn’t brilliant coaching. It was that he did the stuff that he had to do. One of the things I find especially for project managers who grow up from individual contributor to maybe some sort of team, some sort of project manager where as they grow up one of the business management skills that is missing is assertiveness. As they get more and more responsibilities, sometimes they become a little bit more ensure of themselves. Like I read this thing that said: The biggest fear of CEOs is the impostor syndrome that people will find out that we’re not as good as we think of. And so as they get more and more, sometimes they start pulling back on the assertiveness and if anybody would like some advice on that, there’s this woman named Sarah Robb O’Hagan who wrote a book called “Extreme You” and she is like, here are some ways to ramp up your assertiveness. And too often we think sometimes asserti

 Episode 417: Leading During A Disaster (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: For Project Management Professional (PMP)® Students: PMP Exam Prep : Niraj Kumar and Cornelius Fichtner This interview with Niraj Kumar (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the lively Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. We share insights gained from leading teams in the aftermath of the 2016 flood, called the worst Louisiana disaster since Katrina. Learn how our guest led teams through devastation around them and reacted to a life-altering situation, yet stayed true to the mission to serve the community. You will hear how the team leaders collaborated to ensure that the critical tasks get done, operations keep humming, and the affected customers continue to receive service. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Niraj Kumar: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we look into specific leadership behaviors you can practice to adapt to a chaotic and challenging situation. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the lively 2017 PMI Global Conference in Chicago. With me right now is Niraj Kumar. Hello, Niraj! Niraj Kumar: Thank you, Cornelius! It’s nice to be able to talk to you again! Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah and we finally meet in person, aren’t we? Niraj Kumar: Absolutely! It’s so good to see you. Cornelius Fichtner: How is the conference going for you so far? Niraj Kumar: The conference has been fun. A lot of activities and things that people can take back to their work. It’s definitely very helpful for anybody who is a project practitioner, not just for a project manager but anybody who works with projects. Even for stakeholders, this conference can be very helpful. Cornelius Fichtner: You have just finished your presentation a few minutes ago. How was it for you? Niraj Kumar: It was great! People participated and I was glad to see the audience’s interests and how they all resonated with the topic and how they can use some of the things we discussed. Cornelius Fichtner: Alright! We’ll look into all of that as well. Niraj Kumar: Great! Cornelius Fichtner: The topic is “Leading During a Disaster: Lessons Learned from the 2016 Louisiana Flood”. What’s the story behind it? What interested you in discussing, presenting this topic here at the Congress? Niraj Kumar: I decided to present this topic because when we are in a situation that’s chaotic and disastrous like this event was for our work situation, we go through events, we work with other people, we use some skills, we also learn the limitations of what do we read in books and how we really end up practicing when it comes to leading people, influencing people. And what I do is I put a leadership lens on what took place in this context at work. And I give out some tips and ideas that project practitioners and leaders can use to be more effective in a chaotic situation. Cornelius Fichtner: How were you personally affected during this situation? Niraj Kumar: I was affected very deeply because as I said before, it’s one thing to read about a flood. It’s one thing to read about a difficult situation or a war situation. It’s one thing to live through a disaster and work through that. I was in the midst of it and I wanted to share what happens when you were in the middle of it. How does it unfold? And how difficult it is to keep people motivated, how difficult it is to get the work done, what should we focus on? And also how some of the things that you read in the news media are very different when you were in the middle of it when you are trying to get your work done? At the end of the day, we are professionals. We get paid to hit a target. We get our accolades from working through people and that’s my focus. That’s what we come to work for everyday. I fel

 Episode 416: How Millennial Project Managers get Results without Authority (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: For Project Management Professional (PMP)® Students: PMP Exam Prep : Justin Fraser and Cornelius Fichtner For the last several years, there has been a focus on helping senior people in the workplace connect with and manage the newest generation in the workforce. Millennials. However, this new generation is now moving from entry-level to management positions. Additionally, this is frequently happening within a workplace’s evolving environment and culture. And so both generations need to adapt to each other’s styles, work ethics, and perspectives. This interview with Justin Fraser (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the impressive Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. In the interview, we dive into the emerging relationship dynamic in which Millennial project managers lead senior team members. We identify differences in style, work ethic, and perspective between team members of different generations, seniority, and experience, and discuss various project management approaches to lead team members to a successful project. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Justin Fraser: On this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we identify differences in style, work ethic and perspective between team members of different generations, seniority and experience. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the impressive 2017 PMI Global Conference in Chicago. And with me right now is Justin Fraser. Good morning, Justin! Justin Fraser: Good morning! Thanks for having me. I’m really excited to be here and speak to you this morning and you got my name right, which is fantastic. Most people say something in relation… Cornelius Fichtner: We had a small mix up before we started the interview with my questions. I pulled out the questions for a different interview. Justin Fraser: No problem! Cornelius Fichtner: At least I got the name right. That’s a good one! Justin Fraser: Nailed it! Cornelius Fichtner: Is this your first congress? Justin Fraser: This is my third time attending a congress. This is my first time presenting. Cornelius Fichtner: Wow! So comparing it to the previous ones, what’s the energy like this year? Justin Fraser: I think the energy’s great! Actually every year the energy is always great. It’s a bit colder here in Chicago than in the last two years in Florida and San Diego, but this year has been fantastic. Lots of great, great talks and the keynotes are motivating and exciting. I sense some really good energy from a lot of people here. Cornelius Fichtner: Right. Your topic is about millennials and how we are getting results without formal authority. But let me bring this back to the congress. You’re a millennial. You’re the younger generation. What brings you back here? What has the congress that it offers to you as a millennial that you say: I need to go there. This is important. Justin Fraser: Yeah! So I’m only project manager in my company right now and this is something that is important to me because I need to see what others are doing in the industry and in the world. You know you can only take it so far with… Podcast like yours are great to learn a new tip here and there but getting face to face and hearing the talks, networking with folks at breakfast, lunch and dinner and all the other opportunities that are provided here really gives me an opportunity to talk about the challenges that I face and connect with people I have very similar challenges and build relationships with folks that can help me out even when I go back to my office and leave the congress. Cornelius Fichtner: So the topic of your presentation is “Millennial Project Managers – Getting Results Without Formal Authority”. What’s the backsto

 Episode 415: Emotional Intelligence Tools for Smoother Projects (Free) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Play Now: Download Project Management Professional (PMP)® exam prep to your pocket: Kim Wasson and Cornelius Fichtner Ever feel like your projects would run much more smoothly if everyone just did their job without nagging? Help is on the way. Emotional intelligence is the way to really connect with everyone on your team. Take project management to the next level using emotional intelligence principles to guide your interactions and activities. Today we discuss practical applications of emotional intelligence for everything from communications to meetings to celebrations to managing remote teams. This interview with Kim Wasson (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the uplifting Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. In the interview, we discuss how to apply emotional intelligence concepts to day-to-day project management tasks and activities (i.e., communications, team building, assignments, goals, and priorities) and learn to recognize both emotional intelligence and cultural intelligence signals and use them to tailor communications and daily operations. Episode Transcript Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Podcast Introduction Kim Wasson: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, I’ll show you how to apply emotional intelligence concepts to day-to-day project management tasks and activities like communications, team building, assignments’ goals, priorities, anything you do in project management you can use this for. Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner. Podcast Interview Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the uplifting 2017 PMI Global Conference here in Chicago. And with me right now here in the hallways of the conference center is Kim Wasson. Hello, Kim! Kim Wasson: Hello, Cornelius! Cornelius Fichtner: Good morning! How are you? Kim Wasson: I am just fine! Cornelius Fichtner: Just fine. This room over there, 175, that’s where you will be presenting tomorrow. Kim Wasson: That’s where I will be tomorrow. Indeed! Cornelius Fichtner: Okay! Yes and I am now officially going to complain to PMI about the distances one has to walk here. I am going to bring my hiking boots next year! Kim Wasson: It’s really hard to get from place to place but I don’t have to use the gym here. Cornelius Fichtner: So ladies, do not wear high heels. Wear something comfortable. And Jen, same goes for you. Your topic is Emotional Intelligence from Chocolates to Video Conference --- EI Tools for Smoother Projects. Okay! First of all, EI tools. Kim Wasson: Yes, well! Sometimes it’s EQ. Sometimes it’s EI. They are kind of interchangeable but it’s emotional intelligence so EI is kind of the abbreviation but EQ is like IQ. These are tools…I’m really trying to focus in on the practical tools. I want to hand people things to walk out with to build up their tool kit to use these things. Cornelius Fichtner: Wonderful! So emotional intelligence, soft skill, touchy, feely, you’re giving us the tools, are you finally making us use hard tools to do all these soft skill things? Kim Wasson: Yes, that’s the idea! Cornelius Fichtner: Oh wonderful! We project managers love you! Kim Wasson: Exactly! That’s what I’m finding. Everybody feels…last year when I presented, I had a lot of people find me afterwards and say: “That was great! I really loved your presentation. Do I really have to do this?” And it became pretty obvious that the more concrete tools I can give people, the more comfortable they are going to be using them. Cornelius Fichtner: Okay, so why should we care? Kim Wasson: Why should we care? Well obviously if you already like the people side of project management, this just gives you some more tools. But if process is really what you like, you have to realize that just because it’s a process, people aren’t going to use it, right? So i

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