Arts Podcasts

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 066 by Various show

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 066 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

LibriVox's Short Poetry Collection 066: a collection of 20 public-domain poems.

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Librivox: Selection of Australian Poetry and Prose, A by Various show

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A collection of Australian writing from the public domain.

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Librivox: Fables in Rhyme for Little Folks by La Fontaine, Jean de show

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Several of La Fontaine's fables, translated into English by W. T. Larned. (Summary by bge1234)

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Librivox: Outline of Science, Vol. 1, The (Solo) by Thomson, J. Arthur show

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In The Outline of Science, Thomson gives us a window into scientific thinking as it stood in 1922 on the big, the little, and the biological. With straightforward language intended for a general audience, this book covers astronomy from the Solar System to the Milky Way, the submicroscopic makeup of matter from protons and electrons, and the evolution of simple living beings into the varied fauna of the world today. Thomson cites many examples that would have been familiar to his readers of the day and notes where scientific understanding leaves off and conjecture begins. He clearly shows how the accumulation of observation and experiment stacked up to form the body of knowledge reported in the book. For even the scientifically well-versed, there will be interesting nuggets, for investigation into how the world came to be as it was, was both wide and deep. To a modern listener, what was not known may be as interesting as what was. With the 100-inch Mt. Wilson reflector the largest telescope in the world, the existence of galaxies outside the Milky Way was suspected but not confirmed. Neutrons, soon to become important in the field of nuclear energy and atomic bombs, were as yet unguessed-at, yet the prospect of liberating the immense energy of the atom was already a keen interest. Although the famous Michaelson-Morley experiment had already been seen as disproof of an all-pervading "ether" which facilitated the flow of energy across empty space, scientists still retained ether as a place-holder for properties they could measure but not explain - an approach very similar to the "dark matter" of modern cosmology. Regardless of your personal sentiments on Darwin's theory of evolution, Thomson provides well-chosen examples that illustrate why this theory arose. He examines not only the fossil record but the evidences present in modern living beings that the process of evolution is by no means finished, but ongoing. Even at that time, Thomson worried over the future of energy sources. He contemplated the exhaustion of the coal fields and indeed, the eventual exhaustion of all usable energy in the universe, foreshadowing our concept of entropy. This book has been consistently among the "Top 100 E-Books" published by Project Gutenberg. Summary by Mark F. Smith.

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Librivox: Cinema Murder, The by Oppenheim, E. Phillips show

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Phillip Romilly is a poor art teacher in London. He finds out that his wealthy cousin Douglas has been seeing his girl friend Beatrice behind his back. He strangles Douglas, throws him in the canal, and assumes his identity. Douglas had booked passage to America for the next day, so after a pleasant sea voyage Phillip arrives at the Waldorf Hotel in New York as Douglas Romilly. An hour after checking in he disappears again, and assumes yet another identity, one that his cousin had set up for himself. Douglas was facing massive financial problems, and he, too, had planned to avoid his problems by getting lost in the crowd in New York. Now, in chapter two…. (Summary by Maikki)

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Librivox: Arabian Nights Entertainments, The — Volume 01 by Anonymous show

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The main frame story concerns a king and his new bride. The king, Shahryar, upon discovering his ex-wife's infidelity executes her and then declares all women to be unfaithful. He begins to marry a succession of virgins only to execute each one the next morning. Scheherazade agrees to marry him and each night, beginning on the night of their marriage, she tells the king a tale but does not end it so that the king keeps her alive in order to hear the next tale. The stories proceed from this original tale; some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord. Some editions contain only a few hundred tales, while others include 1001 or more stories and "nights." Well known stories from the Nights include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Tale of Master Meadow Mouse, The by Bailey, Arthur Scott show

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This volume in the series, Sleepy-Time Tales, follows the adventures of Master Meadow Mouse as he moves his home to various (safer) places, and tells how he cleverly avoids creatures such as Fatty Coon, Mr. Crow, and Mr. Great Blue Heron, just to name a few. (Summary by Laura Caldwell)

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Librivox: Bible (WNT) NT 02: Mark by Weymouth New Testament show

Librivox: Bible (WNT) NT 02: Mark by Weymouth New TestamentJoin Now to Follow

Richard Francis Weymouth was born on October 26, 1822 near Plymouth Dock, now known as Devonport, near Plymouth, Devonshire, in England. Dr. Weymouth was a Bible scholar and a philologist (a student of the origins of language), as well as a layman, in the English Baptist denomination. He edited “The Resultant Greek Text”, after which he based his “New Testament in Modern Speech”, which was published posthumously in 1903. He passed away on December 27, 1902 in Essex. His work is known for its simpler language and use in private reading. (Summary by Mark Penfold)

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Librivox: Bible (ASV) 08: Ruth by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 08: Ruth by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

During the time of the Judges when there was a famine, an Israelite family from Bethlehem - Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion - emigrate to the nearby country of Moab. Elimelech dies, and the sons marry two Moabite women: Mahlon marries Ruth and Chilion marries Orpah. Then Mahlon and Chilion also die. Naomi decides to return to Bethlehem. She tells her daughters-in-law to return to their own mothers, and remarry. Orpah reluctantly leaves; however, Ruth says, "Don't urge me to leave you or to turn back from you. Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the LORD deal with me, be it ever so severely, if anything but death separates you and me." (Ruth 1:16-17 NIV) The two women return to Bethlehem. It is the time of the barley harvest, and in order to support her mother-in-law and herself, Ruth goes to the fields to glean. The field she goes to belongs to a man named Boaz, who is kind to her because he has heard of her loyalty to her mother-in-law. Ruth tells her mother-in-law of Boaz's kindness, and she gleans in his field through the remainder of the harvest season. Boaz is a close relative of Naomi's husband's family. He is therefore obliged by the levirate law to marry Mahlon's widow, Ruth, in order to carry on his family line. Naomi sends Ruth to the threshing floor at night and tells her to "uncover the feet" of the sleeping Boaz. Ruth does so, Boaz awakes, and Ruth reminds him that he is "the one with the right to redeem." Boaz is willing to "redeem" Ruth, but there is a closer relative with a stronger right to do so. The next morning, Boaz discusses the issue with this man before the town elders. The other relative is unwilling to jeopardise the inheritance of his own estate by marrying Ruth, and so Boaz is free to do so. Boaz and Ruth get married and have a son named Obed (who by levirate customs is also considered a son or heir to Mahlon, and thus Naomi's grandson). In the genealogy which concludes the story, it is pointed out that Obed is the descendant of Perez the son of Judah, and the grandfather of David. (Summary by Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Seven Poor Travellers, The by Dickens, Charles show

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One of Dickens' Christmas stories, this was first published as part of the Christmas number of Household Words for 1854. The first chapter relates Dickens' visit to the ancient Richard Watts's Charity at Rochester. The second chapter is the touching story of "Richard Doubledick", which Dickens supposedly told the travellers, and Dickens' journey home on Christmas morning provides the short concluding chapter. (Summary by Ruth Golding)

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