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Librivox: Hurlbut's Story of the Bible Part Three by Hurlbut, Jesse Lyman show

Librivox: Hurlbut's Story of the Bible Part Three by Hurlbut, Jesse LymanJoin Now to Follow

Some years ago, the editor of an English magazine sent a communication to "the hundred greatest men in Great Britain" asking them this question: "If for any reason you were to spend a year absolutely alone, in a prison for instance, and could select from your library three volumes to be taken with you as companions in your period of retirement please to inform us what those three books would be." The inquiry was sent to peers of the realm, prominent leaders in politics, judges, authors, manufacturers, merchants, gentlemen of leisure—men who would represent every aspect of successful life. In the answers it was found that ninety-eight of the hundred men named "The Bible" first on the list of the three books to be chosen. (From Book introduction)

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Librivox: Bible (YLT) 27: Daniel by Young's Literal Translation show

Librivox: Bible (YLT) 27: Daniel by Young's Literal TranslationJoin Now to Follow

Young's Literal Translation is a translation of the Bible into English, published in 1862. The translation was made by Robert Young, compiler of Young's Analytical Concordance to the Bible and Concise Critical Comments on the New Testament . Young produced a "Revised Version" of the translation in 1887. After he died on October 14, 1888, the publisher in 1898 released a new Revised Edition. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Bible (YLT) 28: Hosea by Young's Literal Translation show

Librivox: Bible (YLT) 28: Hosea by Young's Literal TranslationJoin Now to Follow

Young's Literal Translation is a translation of the Bible into English, published in 1862. The translation was made by Robert Young, compiler of Young's Analytical Concordance to the Bible and Concise Critical Comments on the New Testament . Young produced a "Revised Version" of the translation in 1887. After he died on October 14, 1888, the publisher in 1898 released a new Revised Edition. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Fast in the Ice by Ballantyne, R.M. show

Librivox: Fast in the Ice by Ballantyne, R.M.Join Now to Follow

At the age of 16 Ballantyne went to Canada and was six years in the service of the Hudson's Bay Company. His rule in writing, being in every case, was to write as far as possible from personal knowledge of the scenes he described. In this book he details the lives of the crew as they must overwinter in the frozen north including their meetings with Eskimos and bears and their struggles with disease. This is a realistic account of what life was like for the explorers of the Arctic. (summary by Esther, adapted from wikipedia)

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Librivox: Cattle Brands by Adams, Andy show

Librivox: Cattle Brands by Adams, AndyJoin Now to Follow

Cattle Brands is a collection of 14 entertaining short stories depicting not only the life of cowboys in the wild, wild West, but also the harrowing skirmishes with banditos, thrilling shoot-outs, attempt at and the recapture of stolen chattel from fierce desperados, and much, much more exciting accounts that make one think it all actually happened. (Summary by Kehinde)

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Librivox: Glee for Winter, A by Domett, Alfred show

Librivox: Glee for Winter, A by Domett, AlfredJoin Now to Follow

LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 different recordings of A Glee for Winter by Alfred Domett. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of December 23rd, 2007.

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Librivox: Mind and the Brain, The by Binet, Alfred show

Librivox: Mind and the Brain, The by Binet, AlfredJoin Now to Follow

“This book is a prolonged effort to establish a distinction between what is called mind and what is called matter. Nothing is more simple than to realise this distinction when you do not go deeply into it; nothing is more difficult when you analyse it a little. At first sight, it seems impossible to confuse things so far apart as a thought and a block of stone; but on reflection this great contrast vanishes, and other differences have to be sought which are less apparent and of which one has not hitherto dreamed.” (from The Mind and the Brain)

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Librivox: Works of Tacitus, Vol. I, The by Tacitus, Publius Cornelius show

Librivox: Works of Tacitus, Vol. I, The by Tacitus, Publius CorneliusJoin Now to Follow

The historical works of Tacitus are a history of the period from A.D. 14 to 96 in thirty volumes. Although many of the works were lost (only books 1-5 of the Histories and 1-6 and 11-16 of the Annals survive), enough remains to provide a good sense of Tacitus’s political and moral philosophy. He recognized the necessity for strong rulers but argued that more should be done to manage the succession of power and allow for the ascension of talent. Tacitus asserted that it was the dynastic ambitions of Rome’s many emperors that caused the decline of moral and political life and precluded the possibility of recruiting leaders of real ability. Moreover, the dynastic temptation caused political instability because military force was now required for political change. His works point to the necessity of systematic institutional restraints on power for the preservation of liberty. Gordon’s translation and his lengthy Discourses on Tacitus bring Tacitus’ ideas up to date and apply them to the British state of the early 18th century. (Description from Online Library of Liberty)

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Librivox: Leviathan (Books I and II) by Hobbes, Thomas show

Librivox: Leviathan (Books I and II) by Hobbes, ThomasJoin Now to Follow

Leviathan, or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil, commonly called Leviathan, is a book written in 1651 by Thomas Hobbes. It is titled after the biblical Leviathan. The book concerns the structure of society (as represented figuratively by the frontispiece, showing the state giant made up of individuals), as is evidenced by the full title. In the book, Thomas Hobbes argues for a social contract and rule by a sovereign. Influenced by the English Civil War, Hobbes wrote that chaos or civil war - situations identified with a state of nature and the famous motto Bellum omnium contra omnes ("the war of all against all") - could only be averted by strong central government. He thus denied any right of rebellion toward the social contract. However, Hobbes did discuss the possible dissolution of the State. Since the social contract was made to institute a state that would provide for the "peace and defense" of the people, the contract would become void as soon as the government no longer protected its citizens. By virtue of this fact, man would automatically return to the state of nature until a new contract is made. Summary from Wikipedia.

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Librivox: מסעות בנימין השלישי The Wanderings of Benjamin III by מנדלה מוכר ספרים Mendele Mocher Sforim show

Librivox: מסעות בנימין השלישי The Wanderings of Benjamin III by מנדלה מוכר ספרים Mendele Mocher SforimJoin Now to Follow

This reading is in Hebrew. Mendele Mocher Seforim (Literary name for Shalom Jacob Abramovitsch) (1835 - 1917, b. Kapulye, Belorussia), one of the first modern Jewish writers, wrote in both Hebrew and Yiddish throughout his career. In his work he described with sharp satirical criticism the traditional life in small Jewish towns, as well as tendencies for assimilation of learned Jews at the time. He was regarded as the "grandfather of Yiddish literature" but the Hebraic-Zionist atmosphere in Odessa influenced him, and in 1886 he turned to writing Hebrew fiction. The hero of "The Travels of Benjamin the III" is a fool in a town full of poor Jews who barely manage to keep themselves alive. Benjamin is struck suddenly by a desire to travel, and joined by Sendrel he sets out to find a Jewish kingdom mentioned in legends of the Ten Lost Tribes. They hardly make it around the block. Barely escaping from their own wives, the two travel only as far as nearby towns. As the novel progresses they fall into the hands of Jewish kidnappers, who take advantage of their naiveté to sell them into the czarist army. They are caught when they try to escape, and the army’s response to this treason is a delicious twist that leaves the reader wondering who exactly is insane – and where precisely the line is drawn between an absurdity and a worthwhile dream. (Summary by Omri Lernau)

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