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Librivox: Wahlverwandtschaften, Die by Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von show

Librivox: Wahlverwandtschaften, Die by Goethe, Johann Wolfgang vonJoin Now to Follow

Eduard, ein reicher Baron, lebt mit seiner Gattin Charlotte zurückgezogen in einem Schloss, das von einem großen Park umgeben ist. In zweiter Ehe haben die beiden Liebenden von einst endlich zueinander gefunden. Glücklich über ihre neue Lebenssituation widmen sie sich vornehmlich dem Garten und der Parkgestaltung. Diese Idylle wird gestört, als Eduard seinen Freund, den Hauptmann, auf das Anwesen einlädt. So lässt auch Charlotte ihre Nichte Ottilie herbeiholen, damit diese ihr Gesellschaft leistet. Bald schon fühlt sich Eduard zu Ottilie und Charlotte zum Hauptmann hingezogen. Eines Nachts schleicht Eduard heimlich durchs Schloss und gerät auf der Suche nach Ottilie - "eine sonderbare Verwechslung ging in seiner Seele vor" - ins Schlafgemach seiner Gemahlin. In seiner Vorstellung ist es jedoch Ottilie, die er in den Armen hält, indes Charlotte das Bild des Hauptmanns vorschwebt. Aus dieser Vereinigung geht ein Kind hervor. Als der Abschied von Ottilie und dem Hauptmann droht, gesteht Eduard Ottilie seine Liebe. Der Hauptmann und Charlotte verständigen sich wortlos, ihrer gemeinsamen Liebe zu entsagen. Eduard hingegen kann seine Gefühle nicht unterdrücken und zieht aus Verzweiflung in den Krieg. Das Kind, welches gleichermaßen Ottilie und dem Hauptmann, nicht aber seinen leiblichen Eltern ähnelt, befindet sich in der Obhut von Ottilie, als Eduard aus dem Krieg zurückkehrt. Eduard bedrängt sie erneut in unbändiger Art. Ottilie versucht auszuweichen, indem sie in einem Kahn über den See zurückrudert. Beim hastigen Einsteigen kentert das Boot jedoch und das Kind ertrinkt. Ottilie beschließt daraufhin, ihrer Liebe zu Eduard zu entsagen. Schließlich zieht sie sich zurück, spricht und isst nicht mehr, bis sie letztlich an Schwäche stirbt. Eduard ist zum Schluss lebensmüde, stirbt aber eines natürlichen Todes. Der Roman ist ein typischer Vertreter der Weimarer Klassik. Goethe greift ein gesellschaftliches Thema auf und verbindet es mit einem naturwissenschaftlichen Gleichnis. Die gesellschaftlichen Zwänge von Sitte und Norm werden den individuellen Empfindungen und Neigungen gegenübergestellt. (Summary by Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Virginian, The by Wister, Owen show

Librivox: Virginian, The by Wister, OwenJoin Now to Follow

Quote: Ostensibly a love story, the novel really revolves around a highly mythologized version of the Johnson County War in 1890's Wyoming ... The novel takes the side of the large ranchers, and depicts the lynchings as frontier justice, meted out by the protagonist, who is a member of a natural aristocracy among men. (from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Republic, The by Plato show

Librivox: Republic, The by PlatoJoin Now to Follow

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue by Plato, written in approximately 380 BC. It is one of the most influential works of philosophy and political theory, and arguably Plato's best known work. In it, Socrates and various other Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and whether the just man is happier than the unjust man by constructing an imaginary city ruled by philosopher-kings. The dialogue also discusses the nature of the philosopher, Plato's Theory of Forms, the conflict between philosophy and poetry, and the immortality of the soul. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Master Mystery, The by Reeve, Arthur B. show

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While Harry Houdini didn't rise to fame as a screen actor, silent film makers of the day sought to capitalize on his fame. The Master Mystery was Houdini's first such attempt, and it was embraced by the viewing public, leading to other screen roles following. The hero (or superhero) is Quentin Locke, scientist, agent of the U.S. Justice Department, and not surprisingly, an escape artist extraordinaire. The Master Mystery follows agent Locke through many pitfalls, in true serial fashion, as he is tasked with uncovering a band of thugs and a peculiar metal robot (reportedly the first robot in film) with a brain, called an automaton, which has been robbing potential inventors of their patent rights. All in good fun by today's standards, we find our hero escaping a straightjacket, a diver's suit, and an electric chair to name but a few, and of course winning the hand of the daughter of one of the industrialists along the way. (Summary by Roger Melin)

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Librivox: I saw the Sun at Midnight, rising red by Plunkett, Joseph Mary show

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LibriVox volunteers bring you 24 recordings of I saw the Sun at Midnight, rising red by Joseph Mary Plunkett. This was the weekly poetry project for February 8th, 2009.

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Librivox: To the Old Pagan Religion by Lovecraft, H. P. show

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LibriVox volunteers bring you 17 recordings of To the Old Pagan Religion by H. P. Lovecraft. This was the fortnightly poetry project for February 8th, 2009.

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Librivox: Cruise of the Snark, The by London, Jack show

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The Cruise of the Snark (1913) is a memoir of Jack and Charmian London's 1907-1909 voyage across the Pacific. His descriptions of "surf-riding", which he dubbed a "royal sport", helped introduce it to and popularize it with the mainland. London writes: Through the white crest of a breaker suddenly appears a dark figure, erect, a man-fish or a sea-god, on the very forward face of the crest where the top falls over and down, driving in toward shore, buried to his loins in smoking spray, caught up by the sea and flung landward, bodily, a quarter of a mile. It is a Kanaka on a surf-board. And I know that when I have finished these lines I shall be out in that riot of colour and pounding surf, trying to bit those breakers even as he, and failing as he never failed, but living life as the best of us may live it. Excerpted from Wikipedia.

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Librivox: Short Science Fiction Collection 011 by Various show

Librivox: Short Science Fiction Collection 011 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

Science fiction (abbreviated SF or sci-fi with varying punctuation and case) is a broad genre of fiction that often involves sociological and technical speculations based on current or future science or technology. This is a reader-selected collection of short stories that entered the US public domain when their copyright was not renewed. Summary by Cori Samuel, with Wikipedia input.

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Librivox: As You Like It by Shakespeare, William show

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One of Shakespeare’s most popular plays, As You Like It is a pastoral comedy of mistaken identity, wit, and love. Daughter of a banished duke and forced to flee the court, Rosalind hides in the Forest of Arden disguised as a man. When her true love Orlando also shows up in the forest, she courts him without revealing her identity. Meanwhile, Phebe mistakenly falls in love with her disguise, Silvius pines for Phebe, Jacques philosophizes, and Touchstone makes fun of it all, and love and happiness triumph (for the most part) as Rosalind orchestrates a happy ending amid the confusion. (Summary by Rosalind Wills)

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Librivox: Large Catechism, The by Luther, Martin show

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Luther's Large Catechism consisted of works written by Martin Luther and compiled Christian canonical texts, published in April of 1529. This book was addressed particularly to clergymen to aid them in teaching their congregations. Luther's Large Catechism is divided into five parts: The Ten Commandments, The Apostles' Creed, The Lord's Prayer, Holy Baptism, and The Sacrament of the Altar. It and related documents was published in The Book of Concord in 1580. (from Wikipedia)

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