Podcast Directory

Librivox: Yvain, or the Knight with the Lion by Troyes, Chrétien de show

Librivox: Yvain, or the Knight with the Lion by Troyes, Chrétien deJoin Now to Follow

Yvain, the Knight of the Lion is a romance by Chrétien de Troyes. It was probably written in the 1170s simultaneously with Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, and includes several references to the action in that poem. In the poem, Yvain seeks to avenge his cousin Calogrenant who had been defeated by an otherworldly knight beside a magical storm-making fountain in the forest of Broceliande. (Summary from Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 25: Lamentations by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 25: Lamentations by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

The Book of Lamentations (Hebrew: אֵיכָה‎, Eikha, ʾēḫā(h)) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. It is traditionally read by the Jewish people on Tisha B'Av, the fast day that commemorates the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. It is called in the Hebrew canon 'Eikhah, meaning "How," being the formula for the commencement of a song of wailing. It is the first word of the book (see 2 Sam. 1:19-27). The Septuagint adopted the name rendered "Lamentations" (Greek threnoi = Hebrew qinoth) now in common use, to denote the character of the book, in which the prophet mourns over the desolations brought on Jerusalem and the Holy Land by the Chaldeans. In the Hebrew Bible it is placed among the Ketuvim, the Writings. (Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains, A by Bird, Isabella L. show

Librivox: Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains, A by Bird, Isabella L.Join Now to Follow

Isabella Bird began travelling while in her early twenties to help alleviate illness that had plagued her since childhood. She was a single woman in her early forties when she made her treck through the Rocky Mountains. A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains details this fascinating account of her travels through a series of letters written to her sister, Henrietta. These letters are filled with beautiful, vivid descriptions of the scenery, the people she encountered, the way of life, and a mountain man named Jim Nugent, that was as rough as they come, but a complete gentleman with Ms. Bird. She has the distinction of being the first woman to become a member of the Royal Geographical Society in 1892. (Summary by Laura Caldwell)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Wealth of Nations, Book 1, The by Smith, Adam show

Librivox: Wealth of Nations, Book 1, The by Smith, AdamJoin Now to Follow

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations is the magnum opus of the Scottish economist Adam Smith, published on March 9, 1776 during the Scottish Enlightenment. It is a clearly written account of political economy at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, and is widely considered to be the first modern work in the field of economics. (Summary from Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: That Mainwaring Affair by Barbour, Anna Maynard show

Librivox: That Mainwaring Affair by Barbour, Anna MaynardJoin Now to Follow

As wealthy financier, Hugh Mainwaring dictates his last will and testament to his private secretary, it would be impossible for him to imagine the shocking chain of events that he is about to set into motion. This best-selling mystery novel was first published in 1901 and remains an entertaining mix of detective work, courtroom drama and family intrigue. (Summary by J. M. Smallheer)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts (version 2) by Stockton, Frank R. show

Librivox: Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts (version 2) by Stockton, Frank R.Join Now to Follow

Buccaneers and Pirates of our Coasts is a non-fiction, rolicking story of the origins of piracy and of the famous pirates of the coasts of the United States. The stories don't cast pirates in the glowing light of modern day renditions - in Stockton's stories, pirates are bad guys! - but the dramatic style makes them good fun to read, anyway! (Summary by Sibella Denton)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 32: Jonah by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 32: Jonah by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Jonah is the fifth book in a series of books called the Minor Prophets. Unlike other prophetic books however, this book is not a record of a prophet’s words toward Israel. Instead of the poetry and prophetic prose of Isaiah or Lamentations, this book tells the story of a reluctant prophet who arguably becomes one of the most effective prophets in the entire Bible. (Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 33: Micah by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 33: Micah by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

The book may be divided into three sections: Chapters 1–3 mainly consist of oracles of judgment. Chapters 4–5 of oracles of hope. Chapters 6–7 begins with judgment and moves to hope. Chapters 1–3 mainly consist of oracles of judgment. The judgment motif is so strong in this book that Micah only preached about judgment. Judgment in Micah is seen in the destruction of Samaria, in the coming of an invader against Jerusalem, in the greedy land-grabbers' loss of their land and in their being abandoned by Yahweh, in shame for the false prophets, in the siege of Jerusalem and the cleaning of the land from idolatry and militarism. Chapters 4–5 consist of oracles of hope. The prophet said that those conditions would not prevail forever. Judgment would come but a saved, chastened, and faithful remnant would survive. A new king from the line of David would be replace the present weak king on the throne. He would reign in the majesty of the name of Yahweh. His people would dwell securely and he would be great to the ends of earths. Chapters 6–7 begin with judgment and move to hope. Micah puts a protest on the people's lips, offering any religious response God cared to ask for. God's indictment becomes specific in 6:9–16. Violence, deception, and crooked business practices were rampant. They would bring desolation and destruction to the land. The reference to Omri and Ahab indicates that the same kinds of corruption that destroyed the northern kingdom had now spread to Judah. In conclusion, Micah's later hearers take his messages to heart. His words of hope gave them new heart to live as God's people in a darkened world. (Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 39: Malachi by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 39: Malachi by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

Malachi (or Malachias, מַלְאָכִי, Malʾaḫi, Mál'akhî) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, written by the prophet Malachi. Possibly this is not the name of the author, since Malachi means 'my messenger' or 'my angel' in Hebrew. (Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 37: Haggai by American Standard Version show

Librivox: Bible (ASV) 37: Haggai by American Standard VersionJoin Now to Follow

The Book of Haggai is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament, written by the prophet Haggai. It was written in 520 BC some 18 years after Cyrus had conquered Babylon and issued a decree in 538 BC allowing the captive Jews to return to Judea. He saw the restoration of the temple as necessary for the restoration of the religious practices and a sense of peoplehood after a long exile. It consists of two brief, comprehensive chapters. The object of the prophet is generally urging the people to proceed with the rebuilding of the second Jerusalem temple in 521 BC after the return of the deportees. Haggai attributes a recent drought to the peoples' refusal to rebuild the temple, which he sees as key to Jerusalem’s glory. The book ends with the prediction of the downfall of kingdoms, with one Zerubbabel, governor of Judah, as the Lord’s chosen leader. The language here is not as finely wrought as in some other books of the minor prophets, yet the intent seems straightforward. (Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox