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Librivox: Favole di Jean de La Fontaine: Libro 09 by La Fontaine, Jean de show

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Nei 12 volumi delle "Favole" (1669 - 1693) Jean de La Fontaine rinnovò la tradizione esopica, rappresentando la commedia umana. Quest'opera dimostrò il suo amore per la vita rurale e attraverso animali simbolici ironizzò sulla vita della società dell'epoca. In the 12 volumes/books of "Favole" (1669 - 1693) Jean de La Fontaine renewed Aesop's tradition, representing the human comedy. This demonstrated his love for country life and by symbolic animals he ironized about his current years society's life. (Summary by Paolo Fedi)

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Librivox: Anne's House of Dreams by Montgomery, Lucy Maud show

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Anne's House of Dreams is book five in the series, and chronicles Anne's early married life, as she and her childhood sweetheart Gilbert Blythe begin to build their life together. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Bible (ASV) NT 07: 1 Corinthians by American Standard Version show

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The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. 1 Corinthians is a letter from Paul of Tarsus and Sosthenes to the Christians of Corinth, Greece. This epistle contains some of the best-known phrases in the New Testament, including (depending on the translation) "without love, I am nothing" (13:1) and "when I was a child, I spoke as a child, I felt as a child, I thought as a child" (13:11). Paul turns the hearts of Christians from selfish factionalism to selfless service of others in love. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Bible (ASV) NT 08: 2 Corinthians by American Standard Version show

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The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book in the New Testament, written by Paul the Apostle. In this book, sometimes called Paul's Stormy Weather Epistle, Paul is at his most personal in dealing with the brethren at Corinth. Paul encourages the Christians to examine themselves (2 Cor. 13:5) to test whether they are to be found in Christ as a father helps his children to mature to become the image of Christ himself. (Summary from Wikipedia adapted by Sam Stinson)

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Librivox: Essays, First Series by Emerson, Ralph Waldo show

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“We live in succession, in division, in parts, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty, to which every part and particle is equally related, the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is all accessible to us, is not only self-sufficing and perfect in every hour, but the act of seeing and the thing seen, the seer and the spectacle, the subject and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul”. (From Essay 9, ‘The Over-Soul’)

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Librivox: Persuasion by Austen, Jane show

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Anne Elliott, Jane Austen's only aging heroine, has devoted her life to caring for her financially irresponsible family. Just when she is growing content with her uneventful lifestyle, a long-lost flame re-enters the picture -- now as the beau of her significantly younger cousin. Anne is now faced with a choice: will she watch Captain Wentworth settle into life with another woman, or will she strive to win back his love and escape her family? (Summary by Kirsten Ferreri)

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Librivox: One Third Off by Cobb, Irvin S. show

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Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb (June 23, 1876–March 11, 1944) was an American author, humorist, and columnist who lived in New York and wrote over 60 books and 300 short stories. Cobb has been described as "having a round shape, bushy eyebrows, full lips, and a triple chin. He always had a cigar in his mouth." This book is a hilarious account of Cobb's attempts at weight-loss. (Summary from wikipedia)

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Librivox: Bible (ASV) NT 16: 2 Timothy by American Standard Version show

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The Second Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, written by Paul, and is part of the canonical New Testament. It may have been written sometime in 67 A.D. during Paul's second Roman imprisonment. In his letter, the writer urges Timothy to not have a "spirit of timidity" and to "not be ashamed to testify about our Lord" (1:7-8). The writer also entreats Timothy to come to him before winter, and to bring Mark with him (cf. Philippians 2:22). He was anticipating that "the time of his departure was at hand" (4:6), and he exhorts his "son Timothy" to all diligence and steadfastness in the face of false teachings, with advice about combatting them with reference to the teachings of the past, and to patience under persecution (1:6–15), and to a faithful discharge of all the duties of his office (4:1–5), with all the solemnity of one who was about to appear before the Judge of the quick and the dead. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Bible (ASV) NT 13: 1 Thessalonians by American Standard Version show

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The First Epistle to the Thessalonians, also known as the First Letter to the Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It was written by Paul. (Summary from Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Brewster's Millions by McCutcheon, George Barr show

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The story revolves around Montgomery Brewster, a poor man who inherits a large sum of money. However, there is a catch — he has to spend every penny within 30 days, and end up with nothing at that time. Should he make the deadline, he stands to gain an even larger sum; should he fail, he remains penniless. Brewster finds that spending so much money is more difficult than he first thinks, especially when the lawyers are trying to make him fail so that they can claim the money. What makes it worse is that he starts to be a little too successful with some ventures, actually making money from them. Can Brewster empty his pockets in time for the deadline, or will he end the book as he started it, with nothing?

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