Slashers show

Slashers

Summary: Three guys with virtually no credentials talking to you about movies and more-er for those who love horror. Each week we provide a movie review, history report, biography, or something entirely bizarre! With episodes ranging from slasher classics like Friday the 13th to harrowing accounts of paranormal cryptids, with event coverage and creepypasta in between, we pride ourselves on having something for every gore-loving goon. If you are a horror creator, please reach out, as we also do interviews with filmmakers in the genre. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

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 53- Year End Review | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 6394

What a year it has been! We have reviewed films and provided reports on so many topics! Our pilot episode was Event Horizon,  The first official episode was a review of Pet Sematary (1989), its sequel, and the novel by Stephen King. Then we moved on to An American Werewolf in London.  The next film we discussed was The Faculty, think Invasion of the Body Snatchers, but with pomade. We then argued about C.H.U.D., where Jake defended it while Bryan was resoundingly luke warm on the classic.  Mimic was the debut appearance of Jake's beautiful wife, Ciara. We had a failed foray into true crime discussing the Ted Bundy confession tapes documentary that sucked ass. Ciara returned very quickly and we talked The Craft.  Our next Stephen King adaptation was Salem's Lot.  Blood Diner was the undefeated "Trashic" champion for the entire year, the best good-bad movie of all.  We then reviewed Carrie, who according to the novel "...eats shit." Next was the very loose H.P. Lovecraft adaptation, Castle Freak.  We reviewed two Leprechaun films, the original and the 4th, in space.  We have done two Clint Howard classics, Ice Cream Man and Ticks.  Did you know that Stephen King wrote The Running Man?  Street Trash features an old fashioned dick toss. The Lost Boys has nothing to do with Peter Pan. Return of the Killer Tomatoes is incalculably better than the original. Toxic Avenger Part III sucks. The Void is spectacular. The Omen has the best opening of any movie ever. Legion is actually rad. So I Married an Axe Murderer is an affront to human decency. 1408 is succinct. Body Bags should have been an ongoing series. Cujo is rabid. High Tension is French. The Loved Ones was more fun than prom. Jaws is totes gnar. Vampire Hunter D really ain't bad. As Above, So Below is literature in disguise. Maximum Overdrive proves Stanley Kubrick was right. Arachnophobia makes me happy. Eight Legged Freaks holds up super well. It, is too long of a book, but all of the film adaptations are worthwhile. Tales from the Crypt should be mandatory reading. Bad Taste will change your view of independent film. Wes Craven was a weirdo, but a legend. Battle of the Cryptids, because bigfoot would do jiu jitsu. Alien, while derivative, is wholly unique. Shaun of the Dead, is kinda the same as Alien in that regard.  The Shining is a masterpiece, but people are crazy.  Marvel Zombies is exhausting, but great. Yokai are super duper interesting. Hammer Films are legendary. Little Monsters is charming. Phantoms is bad. Gremlinsis the perfect holiday film. 13th Warrior is an honorary slasher due to swords. Krampus needs to be a yearly tradition. Demonic Toys vs. Small Soldiers is actually a closer argument than you'd think. This week's "Hidden Track" is actually our new official theme song! The song is I wanna Die by Mini Meltdowns. https://open.spotify.com/artist/5ZAk6lUDsaJj8EAhrhzZnh ; https://minimeltdowns.bandcamp.com/ If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 52- Demonic Toys (1992) vs Small Soldiers (1998) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5358

One was a direct-to-video rehash of a fledgling studio's biggest success; the other, was a multimillion dollar behemoth that should have taken the world by storm. How do they compare? This is our first "VERSUS MODE" episode, and we plan to pit more comparable movies against each other in the future. Please let us know what you think! Demonic Toys, released 1992, was shot on a shoestring budget with handpuppets. These puppets would go on to make cameo appearances in The Dollman vs. The Demonic Toys, The Puppet Master vs. The Demonic Toys, Devil Dolls, The Haunted Dollhouse, and Evil Bong and ultimately get their own sequel 18 years later in The Demonic Toys 2: Personal Demons. The puppets were actually referenced in Krampus, with very similar toys, with the same penchant for bloodshed.  The film was written by David S. Goyer (Batman Begins, The Dark Knight, Dark City, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Nick Fury: Agent of Shield, Blade, Blade II, Blade Trinity, Jumper, Ghostrider Spirit of Vengeance... are you seeing a theme here?). Goyer's story involves a demon, trapped in a nether realm, trying to possess the unborn, bastard child of a recently widowed police officer.  Charles Band, head of Full Moon Films, produced this film, as he had 304 others. If you compiled all the budgets to his films, you still might not even total the budget of its competitor on this episode: Small Soldiers. His brother, Richard Band, did the music. Totally appropriate name, right? Now Small Soldiers had a budget of $40,000,000. It was directed by the prolific Joe Dante (Gremlins, The Howling). Stan Winston (Terminator, Predator, Alien) designed and made the titular Small Soldiers. It had the amazing orchestration of Jerry buttfucking Goldsmith (Star Trek, Jurassic Park, Rambo). The film also spawned a toy line and multiple video games.  The film pits the Commando Elite (basically G.I. Joes) against the Gorgonites (kinda think Masters of the Universe... oh, and Frank Langella who played Skeletor plays the Gorgonite leader, Archer!). Blah blah, technobabble, the animatronic toys actually go crazy in an imperialist quest to subjugate and destroy the monster toys, upheaving a suburban town.  Sadly, this was Phil Hartman's last film. Aside from being about 30 minutes too long, this was a decent sendoff to a comedy legend. Comedy powerhouses Jay Mohr, David Cross, and Denis Leary create a great backdrop to to a mosaic of special effects and mayhem.  As we contrast the two, we discuss special effects, plot/ story, cinematography, acting, directing, music, basically everything that makes a movie not suck.  If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 51- Krampus (2015) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 6669

Sure we are too late for Krampusnacht, but we are int time for Santa Day! This movie has a special space in the shriveled black blood-pumping hearts of Bryan and Chad, who saw it together in theaters years ago. Since then, every year they exchange some form of Krampus present to celebrate Christmas.  The film starts Emjay Anthony as Max Engel, a child trying to reconcile being too old to believe in Santa and the aftermath of his Kevin McAlister-style outburst. Adam Scott (Parks and Rec, Ghosted,  Little Evil, Piranha 3D) as Tom Engel, the somewhat distant father who is dreadingyet another holiday with his in-laws. Toni Collette (Hereditary, Little Miss Sunshine, Knives Out) as Sarah Engel, a woman desperately trying to keep some semblance of civility in a house of wolves! David Koechner (Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse, Hell and Back, A Haunted House) as Howard, who is basically Jake's father-in-law throughout the film. Last, Conchata Ferrell plays Aunt Dorothy. She is delightful. Sure, she plays the same character in everything, but still. So great.  The film was written and directed by Michael Dougherty, an aficionado of holiday horror. How he leveraged his cult success, Trick 'r Treat into making  huge-budget Godzilla movies, I will never know, but this movie really showed his capabilities as a director.  The film is rife with references and homage, ranging from Demonic Toys, to Tremors, with a Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors, and Gremlins in between.  The "Hidden Track" this week is Terra Atlantica with their song, THE AVENGING NARWHAL!   https://www.terra-atlantica.de/,  Instagram: @terraatlantica https://open.spotify.com/artist/2jjCMNei7oJGKMal41tAZE If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 50- The 13th Warrior (1999) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 7530

I can feel your confusion radiating through time and space. Sword and sorcery on a horror podcast? Now wait one sanctimonious second! First off, it is based on a book by Michael Crichton named EATERS OF THE DEAD, which aside from being totally metal, is also pretty horrific. The book is about cannibalistic cavemen that torment viking villages dressed like the monster from The Village. Next, they use swords, which means? Yes, they are literal SLASHERS! Now, the original cut of the film by John McTiernan (Die Hard, Predator, Last Action Hero) was more horror, as evidenced by an abandoned movie trailer, which resurfaced online. That cut was deemed "unwatchable" by author/ producer, Crichton, who took over reshoots and changed the name to The 13th Warrior. We get into the reasoning behind that name change on the show. McTiernan later went to prison for wiretapping in relation to the Rollerball remake, so this was probably for the best.  Crichton not only changed the pacing of the film, cutting the run time by almost a half hour, but he also replaced Graeme Revell (The Crow, From Dusk Till Dawn, Freddy vs Jason) with Jerry Goldsmith (Alien , Poltergeist, Gremlins). We get into the comparisons of the two soundtracks.  The film stars Antonio Banderas (Desperado, Interview with a Vampire, The Mask of Zorro) as Ahmad ibn Fadlan. Fadlan was a real-life Muslim traveler who ventured into Scandinavia and provided a tremendous account of viking funeral rites. Banderas is joined by a bunch of giant white dudes, whose names are too hard to spell and frankly aren't worth the metadata.  The narrative follows Fadlan, almost like an Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter, as he goes on a quest beyond his historical counterpart, into a bizarre situation where he is basically ordered by a soothsayer to accompany a band of vikings as The 13th Warrior.  This episode is very fact-intensive. We cross-reference the original Fadlan manuscript with Norse Mythology, and Eaters of the Dead. Plus, you get to hear Jake make bold claims, like that the second half of this film is as good, if not better, than The Lord of the Rings, all while mispronouncing virtually every character's name! This week's "Hidden Track" is Faerie Ring, with their song: Heavy Trip. This song comes from their album The Clearing. The first 20 fans that message slasherspod@gmail.com with the secret password and we will reply with a download code to get that album FOR FREE! You can find them at https://faeriering.bandcamp.com/ and https://www.instagram.com/faerie_ring/ If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 49- Gremlins (1984) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5916

Imagine you're Chris Columbus, y'know, the dude who wrote The Goonies, but before that. Oh, and before you directed Home Alone... and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York... and two Harry Potter Films... and Adventures in Babysitting. Imagine you are living in squalor and the rats in your New York City apartment inspire you to write about creepy crawlers. Then, suppose Steven Spielberg, director of Jaws, E.T., and Indiana Jones buys that script and wants to produce it. Without that almost unfathomably unlikely series of events, we would not have this week's episode on Gremlins.  Columbus' initial draft of the script was much grimmer, featuring the death of Barney, our hero's beloved pup, decapitations, and much more. The script underwent many rewrites, with several members of the cast and crew indicating they settled around 10! Directed by Joe Dante (Piranha, The Howling, Masters of Horror) this small budget holiday film was an incredible financial success, spawning a sequel and two international theme park rides! The special effects were by Chris Walas (The Fly, Return of the Jedi, Humanoids from the Deep), who proudly boasted that many effects in the final cut of the film were developed just the day before shooting. There were so many puppets and practical effects in the film that they lost count. In several sequences, puppeteers had to have a puppet on each hand and even on top of their heads! Zach Galligan (Waxwork, Hatchet 3, Nightbeasts) plays Billy Peltzer. Billy has aspirations of much more than being a bank teller and is entrusted with great responsibility by his father, played by Hoyt Axton, when he is given an incredibly unique Christmas present. Gizmo, Billy's Christmas present, is played by Howie Mandel (Little Monsters).  Phoebe Cates (Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Drop Dead Fred) plays basically the antithetical role to her red-bikini-wearing seductress, and plays Kate, a well-intentioned, hard working small town girl. She also gives one of, if not my absolute favorite monologues in all of film history.  Corey Feldman play's Billy's friend, Pete. If you are confused as to why Billy is so much older than his little friend (*in Scarface voice*) it is because Billy was originally the same age, until he was aged in later drafts of the script.  The film has some astounding cameo talent from the late Dick Miller to Judge Reinhold. While the movie is all the better for it, unfortunately the majority of Reinhold's part was cut, as the unnecessary real estate subplot was left on the cutting room floor. Miller, who plays the somewhat soothsaying Murray Futterman, was so excellent in this bit part that he was brought back for the sequel: Gremlins 2: The New Batch.  In this episode, we review the film delve into the history and trivia, and Jake gives his hair-brained theory as to why this film, The Howling, and Indiana Jones are all in a shared universe. We also take excerpts from the very bizarre novelization of the film by George Gipe. Gipe also did novelizations for Back to the Future and Explorers! By this point, he had also written The Man with Two Brains! This week's "Hidden Track" is Bone Church with their song: Pale Moon Sacrifice.  https://bonechurch1.bandcamp.com/ ; https://www.facebook.com/bonexchurch/ Also, be sure to check out Danny Bones' podcast: https://themoviesnack.blubrry.net/author/themoviesnack/ If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 48- Phantoms (1998) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 6808

Let's start off December with a chilling tale of mountain horror, brought to you by Dean R. Koontz! His novel, Phantoms, pre-dated Stephen King's IT and there are so many similarities, it borders on suspicious. An ancient creature, that can shapeshift, hires lackeys to do its bidding, travels through the sewers, and systematically preys on a small town. There are more similarities between Pennywise and "The Ancient Enemy" of course, and we get into them! We also discuss the similarities between H.P. Lovecraft's Nyarlathotep and The Ancient Enemy. As for film references, there is also John Carpenter's The Thing and The Blob. Do we talk about them? Shit yeah! Joanna Going plays Dr. Jennifer Pailey, who is brining her kid sister, Lisa (Rose McGowan, Scream, Planet Terror) home with her. When they arrive, the find the housekeeper is dead, and even the good doctor cannot discern why or how. They go to the police department, finding another corpse in similar fashion.  Along the way, they meet up with Sheriff Bryce Hammond (Ben Affleck, Argo, Justice League) and two deputies, Steve Shanning (Nicky Katt, Sin City, Boiler Room) and Stu Wargle (Liev Shreiber, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Ray Donovan). The shapeshifting evil begins picking off the gang until Dr. Timothy Flyte (Peter O'Toole, Lawrence of Arabia, Troy) is brought in as the resident expert in mass disappearances.  The entity enlists Flyte to be his apostle, spreading its gospel, but in its hubris, gives the necessary insight as to overcome the Ancient Enemy.  This week's "Hidden Track" is by DJ KWEST. You can find his music on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/djkwesty and his social media on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/i_am_kwestmusic/ horror, movie review, discussion, behind the scenes, history, movie production, special effects --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 Bonus: Artik Q&A | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2393

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, we would like to share our gratitude for all of our loyal listeners and give you a bonus episode! This is a Q&A we did recently at a screening of Artik with director, Tom Botchii, actors, Jerry G. Angelo and Matt Mercer, and cinematographer, Martin Moody.  Even if you haven't seen the film, it is an interesting discussion. Learn how Tom basically bankrolled the movie himself, rather than wait patiently for studio involvement. Plus, get a glimpse into Tom's writing process and his inspiration from his experiences working on Marvel films. Learn the process that Jerry and Matt took in approaching the material. Also, Martin goes into detail in his method and gives glimpses into some technical aspects of the film you may have missed! If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast  horror, movie review, commentary, behind the scenes, trivia, movie production --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 47- Little Monsters (2019) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5189

No, not the movie where they buried Howie Mandel in blue makeup and prostheses and put him across from Fred Savage, the flick with Academy Award Winning actress, Lupita Nyong'o! Fresh off her award-winning performance in 12 Years a Slave, which-- oh yeah, was her feature film debut! Lupita opted to try out comedy in an absurd dark comedy, which adds rabid fourth graders to the classic Rom Zom formula, mastered by Peter Jackson (Dead Alive/ Brain Dead) and Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead). She credits her massively jacked shoulders from her work on Black Panther, just months before.  Written and directed by Abe Forsythe, a filmmaker who previously had no aspirations of making a Rom Zom. The story was organically conceived when he dropped his son, who has severe food allergies, off with his primary school teacher. While on a field trip, Forsythe wondered to himself if a zombie outbreak started at that very instant, if his son and his classmates would be safe. Forsythe was so impressed with his son's teacher, the answer was resoundingly yes. Since recording this episode, it was confirmed he is set to direct a new installment in the RoboCop franchise: Robocop Returns, rumored to have Peter Weller returning as the titular character.  Opposite Lupita is Alexander England as "Uncle David"  Anderson. England had previously been in Down Under, also directed by Abe Forsythe.  While Josh Gad joked that this film would equate to career suicide, it seemed to be a return to his roots on The Book of Mormon. Perhaps best known as Olaf in Frozen, Gad plays the jaded children's star Teddy McGiggle, whose crowning achievement is sleeping with as many single moms as possible.  This week's "Hidden Track" is Them! by Francis Hollow. The EP it's on, "The Darkness and All It's Friends," is a tribute to horror movies from the 1920's - 1950's from a more modern music perspective. Each song is based around a different movie (in order) The Wolf Man (1941), THEM! (1954), Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954), and Nosferatu (1922). The artwork was done in collaboration with Spanish Artist Nache Ramos, more of his work can be found at https://nacheramos.tumblr.com/. Francis Hollow can be  If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast zombies, the walking dead, monster movie, horror, movie review, commentary, behind the scenes, trivia, movie production --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 46- Hammer Films | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5653

Some have called it "The Studio that Dripped Blood," and for good reason; Hammer Films was one of the most prolific horror production companies of all time and its legacy has permeated many forms of media, whether acknowledged or not. Founded by William Hinds and James Carreras, Hammer Film Productions, Ltd. was initially in the business of "quota quickies," which were cheap and uninspired filler films.  After being presented with a film project to rejuvenate the Frankenstein brand, the studio opted to make their own, since Mary Shelly's work was already in the public domain. With The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), the film company rebranded to almost exclusively guts and gore forevermore. Their next foray was Dracula (1958), which also starred Christopher Lee as the monster.  In The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), rather than the monster reappearing as he had in the many Universal Monster films, it was Dr. Frankenstein.  The Evil of Frankenstein (1964) had Peter Cushing return to his mad scientist.  Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) was odd and bad, but worth seeing. Frankenstein Must be Destroyed (1969) had some high points. Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell (1974) featured some adept makeup and effect work.  Christopher Lee played yet another monster, which was also played by the prolific Boris Karloff, the titular mummy in The Mummy (1959).  The Brides of Dracula (1960) was a well received blend of sex and violence. The Curse of the Werewolf (1961) was sadly the studio's only werewolf film. The Phantom of the Opera (1962) was somewhat cursed from the outset, having originally been conceived for Cary Grant before he backed out. Delving into more mythic subject matter, The Gorgon (1964) had some fun practical effects for Medusa and her serpent hair.  Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966), Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968),  Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970), Scars of Dracula (1970), The Vampire Lovers (1970), Dracula AD 1972 (1972), and The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973). The Plague of the Zombies (1966) has some charm. The Reptile (1966) was a schlocky, but well made, creature feature.  The Mummy's Shroud (1967)  Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971) was arguably before its time, touching on gender norms.  This week's "Hidden Track" is Silent Horror. Their new album can be found here: https://silenthorror.bigcartel.com/. If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 45- Yokai | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5331

Yōkai (妖怪, ghost, phantom, strange apparition), the term is basically a catchall for Japanese supernatural monsters, spirits, and demons in  folklore. The word itself is made up of the kanji for "bewitching; attractive; calamity" and "spectre; apparition; mystery; suspicious." Yokai were apparently the first monumental monster card game, pre-dating Pokemon by about a thousand years. Yokai have spawned comics, video games, cartoons, movies, media, and collectibles.  There are many subsets of Yokai, including oni, tengu, tsukumogami, and yūrei. In this episode, we break down the history of these creatures, and how they are   Jake's favorite yokai are kappa, smaller amphibious creatures with bowls of water atop their heads.  Shirime are faceless humanoids with a gaping eye where their gaping butthole should be.  Ashiaraiyahiki are giant feet that stomp through ceilings, commanding the inhabitants to wash them.  Gashadokuro are giant skeletons that rattle around, adding bones and bodies to their hulking forms to make them even more gigantic skeletons.  The "Hidden Track" is Hyuman with their song Battle Against a True Samurai. Their music can be found https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClrASeJSkOZIlsPkyge0gMQ ; https://soundcloud.com/user-416470441 ; and https://www.instagram.com/just_hyuman/ If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast monsters, cryptids, demons, ghosts, creatures, Obake, Tengu, Tsukumogami, Yamauba, Kintaro, Rokurokubi, Yurei, slit mouth woman --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 44- Marvel Zombies Part 2 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5378

You may recall from last episode that Marvel Zombies was conceived by Mark Millar (Kickass, Kingsmen, Wanted, Nemesis, Starlight, and The Magic Order). After his initial Ultimate Fantastic Four storyline "Crossover," he gave over the Zombies imprint to Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead, Invincible) and Sean Phillips (Judge Dredd, Hellblazer, Sleeper, Criminal, Incognito, Fatale).  After Millar, Kirkman, and Phillips moved on, the franchise was picked up by Fred Van Lente (Cowboys & Aliens, Archer & Armstrong, X-Men: Noir) who actually helmed the title longer than anyone else. Artist, Kev Walker (2000 AD, Rogue Trooper, Dungeons & Dragons), took over on the penciling and gave a more modern style to Phillips' muted, classic method. Though there are some familiar faces Van Lente's cast of characters such as Deadpool and Howard the Duck, the others are much more niche than his predecessors: Machine Man, Morbius, Jennifer Kale, Man Thing, Werewolf by Night, and Daimon Hellstrom. The Inhumans also appear, with a gutsy end for the beloved, teleporting Lackjaw.  In Marvel Zombies Return, Van Lente had help from many other prolific writers in the genre. David Wellington is both a college friend of Fred Van Lente and a prolific horror author, having penned vampire novels starring vampire hunter Laura Caxton and a zombie apocalypse trilogy: Monster Island, Monster Nation, and Monster Planet. Jonathan Maberry, is not only the author of Punisher MAX: Naked Kill and Black Panther. He also wrote the novel, Ghost Road Blues, which won a Bram Stoker award. His follow-up novel, Patient Zero, is what ultimately got him the writing assignment for Marvel Zombies. Seth Grahame-Smith is best known for Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Jake touches on Marvel Zombies: Evil Evolution, which involves the Marvel Apes franchise, but since he hates it, he does not belabor the point.  We round off the episode talking about Marvel Zombies 5, Marvel Zombies: Supreme, Marvel Zombies Destroy!, Marvel Zombies Halloween, Zombies Assemble, and DCeased (which, yeah-- obviously isn't Marvel, but is interesting enough to warrant a comment or two).  The "Hidden Track" for this week is Gerardo Preciado aka Ancient Order of the Droids, with his wholly original soundtrack for a movie that does not exist: Zombiria! Be sure to track his kickstarter campaign for a vinyl pressing https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/musikedidiable/zombiria-limited-edition-vinyl-soundtrack ; https://open.spotify.com/artist/5IVlx6vuJszX7AvQ2xU4Oj Be sure to check out their upcoming album. Devices, which will release in October. If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast zombies, monsters, horror, Avengers, X-Men, X-Force, Heroes for Hire, The Defenders,  Dead Days, Shaun of the Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Night of the Living Dead, Return of the Living Dead, Little Monsters, S.H.I.E.L.D., Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Guardians of the Galaxy, Captain Marvel, Doctor Strange --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 43- Marvel Zombies Part 1 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 4983

What started as an outwardly mocked pitch by Mark Millar in the break room at Marvel, turned into the best selling trade paper back of all time and a monumental franchise: Marvel Zombies. In this episode, Jake shows off just how deeply rooted his nerdism goes, rifling off trivia no one, not even the artists and creators who made this stuff, actually care about.  You might know Millar's name from pioneering The Ultimate Universe with Brian Michael Bendis, which was integral in creating the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Also, remember that whole Civil War thing? Yeah, that's Millar.  Moreover, his independent work has spawned very successful franchises as well: Kickass, Kingsmen, Wanted, Nemesis, Starlight, and The Magic Order.  The marketing for the initial story arc "Crossover," teased a melding of the Ultimate Universe and the traditional Marvel Universe, but in actuality, it was something much more nefarious. A young Reed Richards is duped by his machiavellian zombie dopplegangar to open up their dimension for a feast of the undead. It is up to Magneto, The Thing, The Human Torch, and Sue Storm to stop The Hunger Virus from spreading. After his initial three-issue story arch in Ultimate Fantastic Four, Millar gave over the reigns to Robert Kirkman of Walking Dead and Invincible fame.  Kirkman teamed with Sean Phillips (Judge Dredd, Hellblazer, Sleeper, Criminal, Incognito, Fatale) to create the first two installments of the Marvel Zombies runs. Their story takes place over countless lightyears, with a cast of characters including: Colonel (Captain) America, Spider-Man, Iron Man, Hawkeye, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, Powerman, Iron Fist, Daredevil, Giant Man, Wasp, Black Panther, Thanos, Silver Surfer, Galactus, and so, so many more. At the time, some of these heroes were relatively obscure, but now after the success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, these are household names.  In another very ambitious crossover, Marvel negotiated a deal with Dynamite Comics for a story arc wherein The Evil Dead squared off with the Marvel Dead. This story sets forth how Ash Williams and The Sentry entered the Marvel Zombies dimension at the same time, detailing much more of the unspoken substance from the other installments.  The "Hidden Track" for this week is The Rhythm Coffin: https://therhythmcoffin.bandcamp.com/ Be sure to check out their upcoming album. Devices, which will release in October. If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast zombies, monsters, horror, Avengers, X-Men, X-Force, Heroes for Hire, The Defenders,  Dead Days, Shaun of the Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Night of the Living Dead, Return of the Living Dead, Little Monsters, S.H.I.E.L.D. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 42- The Shining (1980) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 6828

Masterpiece or abomination? According to like, 90% of people, Stanley Kubrick's The Shining is a peerless magnum opus; however, according to Stephen King and a few of his cronies, it's uglier than a naked old lady rotting in a bathtub.  Let's compare, shall we? Kubrick directed 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, and Full Metal Jacket. King directed Maximum Overdrive. Ahem... MOVING ON! This film has been embroiled in controversy and skepticism since its debut in 1980. There are theories that span from Kubrick being a secret Nazi fascist, to a free mason, to a man plagued with silent outrage after not being able to take credit for faking the moon landing, with ten 237 other theories in between! ...or was it 217? The film has a tremendous, albeit minimal cast. Jack Nicholson (Chinatown, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Little Shop of Horrors) kills it (pun intended) as recovering alcoholic and general louse, Jack Torrance. Torrance is the "caretaker" of the Overlook Hotel, who wants to be a part of "management," at the expense of his family and his sanity.  Shelley Duvall (Popeye, Annie Hall, Rocketman) plays his long-suffering wife, Winifred- NOT Winnie or Freddy. Scatman Crothers (Aristocats, Twilight Zone: The Movie, Transformers: The Movie) is Dick Hallorann, who enacts one of the film's greatest variances from the book- which Jake loves and Bryan hates.  This episode contrasts the book and movie, as we do with all of our King episodes. We talk the major differences, such as the Overlook Hotel exploding with Jack Torrance's hands melting to the broiler, to Jack Nicholson freezing in a hedge maze. We also talk some of the smaller variations like Tony, Danny's imaginary friend, either being a distant apparition or a chatty finger.  Also, as you can imagine, there will almost definitely be a reboot, remake, re-whatever in the future. So, we talk about elements of the movies that could work, and those, like those damn topiary animals, that just won't... ever... seriously, Stephen- just drop it.  We hope this episode will help you to prepare for Doctor Sleep, hitting theaters next month. We will be reviewing both the novel and film of that as well! This week's "Hidden Track" is Alex Cuervo, aka Espectrostatic, fittingly with his song Shiver. https://espectrostatic.bandcamp.com/ & http://alexcuervo.net/ If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast come play with us danny, ghosts, haunted, here's johnny, all work and no play makes jack a dull boy, paranormal, redrum --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 41- Shaun of the Dead (2004) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5251

Truly, this film is legendary. With performances by Simon Pegg (Star Trek, The World's End, Hot Fuzz) and Nick Frost (Paul, Attack the Block, Into the Badlands) that have been often imitated, but never duplicated. Atop a stellar script by Edgar Wright (Baby Driver, Scott Pilgrim) and Pegg, there is very little to change, even from the most critical perspective. Originally, this started out as a bit in an episode of Spaced, where Pegg, Frost, and Wright worked together. There, the idea to create a full length zombie feature was conceived, with a one-page Word Document on Wright's computer.  Everything in the film seems so deliberate from the camera angles to the quick edits. We discuss Wright and Pegg's cameo in George A. Romero's Land of the Dead, which also paid tribute to Day of the Dead in its own unique way. The references and homage does not end there, with other nods to the like of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Lucio Fulci, Dawn of the Dead, and more.  The film even features a bit part for Martin Freeman, who would go on to be in The Hobbit, Captain America: Civil War, and Sherlock.  This week's "Hidden Track" is by Adrianna Krikl. She has been kind enough to provide us with cassettes of her newest release. To enter to win, just take a screen cap showing that you are listening to her music or following her on social media, then send it to us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, or at slasherspod@gmail.com.  Hidden Track: https://www.instagram.com/adriannakrikl/ https://www.facebook.com/kriklmusic/ https://twitter.com/adriannakrikl www.adriannakrikl.com https://open.spotify.com/artist/1Z4kmc6XO62fbCU8ww2SXv?si=tLn_U2DFTWyRRV6UEc1dpg If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast horror, horror comedy, rom com, romantic comedy, zombies, undead, living dead, dark comedy --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

 40- Alien (1979) | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5595

In space... no one can hear anything but my annoying nasally voice yelling at my wife and best friend about how much I love Alien! Written by Dan O'Bannon and Ronald Shusett, the film was O'Bannon's reintroduction to Hollywood after living in a think-tank on the ill-fated Jodorowsky's Dune. The time abroad served invaluable, as it introduced him to H.R. Giger and his hideously sexual brooding art that would take an admittedly lacking story and turn it into a classic with the help of director, Ridley Scott.  Hot off the moderate success of The Duelists, Scott decided to leave the Napoleonic era long in the past, delving into a gritty, industrial future.  Between Giger and O'Bannon (who did set design for Dark Star and Star Wars) the film has an unmistakable aesthetic, which was captured perfectly by Scott, much to the chagrin of some of his actors. For instance, Tom Skerritt, was openly critical of Scott taking so long to set up shots, because he fell out of character.  The film stars Sigourney Weaver as Ellen Ripley. Aside from a part in Madman (which you can see was later aggrandized after the success of Alien) Weaver was predominantly a theater actor. She would go on to make more than the budget of this entire film to appear in the sequel: Aliens. She would go on to star in four installments of this series, which has grossed over $1,000,000,000 in her lifetime.  Listen as we discuss the practical effects, such as the design of the Nostromo and the Space Jockey, and the ingenuity of using real animal parts in the facehugger's eggsack. Did you know that they used condoms in making the xenomorph? Well don't worry, because Jake mentions it like 10 times throughout this episode. We also discuss some of the deleted scenes and the infamous alternate ending that was luckily scrapped.  If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast sci fi, outer space, spaceship, extraterrestrials, android, monster, creature feature, jaws, danzig mother, A.E. Van Vogt, Discord in Scarlet, Voyage of the Space Beagle, Prometheus, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Alien vs. Predator, AVP, Alien Covenant, Forbidden Planet, Planet of the Vampires, Junkyard, Strange Relations, EC Comics, Ron Cobb, future, survival,  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

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