Spectrum Stories show

Spectrum Stories

Summary: We provide comprehensive news and analysis of advances in autism research. Through our work, we hope to catalyze new collaborations and perspectives on autism. We sift through the steady stream of autism papers and highlight the most noteworthy. Our deeply reported news articles explain the context and impact of each finding. We also turn to experts in the field for their opinions on trends or controversies in autism research.

Podcasts:

 Why don’t we have better drugs for autism? | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 11:37

Why don’t we have better drugs for autism?

 Measuring the outcome of clinical trials | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 11:37

Measuring the outcome of clinical trials

 When lab meets life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:26
 When lab meets life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:26

Advances in autism research usually take center stage on Spectrum, but we don’t often talk about what it takes to get there: years training for a faculty job, long hours at the bench, deferred marriage or children, missed vacations, long-distance relationships and, perhaps, complex childcare arrangements. In this special report, we decided to focus on […]

 The builders: How parents shaped autism research | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:54

A group of savvy parents jump-started autism research in California, but they also set the research agenda.

 The innovators: How families launch their own autism studies | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:54

Some parents are starting ‘N-of-1’ studies for autism, but their efforts don’t always get taken seriously.

 Family ties podcast | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:54
 New technology gives voice to nonverbal people with autism | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

A new service provides personalized voices for people who use speech-generating devices. The service, called VocaliD, could help the nearly 25 percent of children with autism who speak few to no words.

 Animated theory | File Type: video/avi | Duration: Unknown

People with autism tend to use more expressive language than controls do when asked to describe the movement of geometric shapes. But their descriptions are inaccurate.

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