RadioMD (All Shows) show

RadioMD (All Shows)

Summary: RadioMD’s “talking” Health A-Z Interviews with experts in the world of health, including world-renowned physicians, authors and celebrities in every area of health, wellness, fitness and medicine. Learn the best ways to stay fit, stay healthy and stay well.

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  • Artist: RadioMD - Health, Wellness and Fitness
  • Copyright: Copyright RadioMD.com

Podcasts:

 Sound the Alarm: Jay Leno Discusses "Bad" Cholesterol and Its Link to Heart Attack ... | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Jay Leno has teamed up with Amgen on Cholesterol 911, a national campaign that is aiming to raise awareness about high LDL-C, also known as “bad” cholesterol.Every 40 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack or stroke. Lowering your LDL cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol) is considered the most modifiable risk factor. However, many people do not understand the connection between having high levels of “bad” cholesterol and their risk of cardiovascular disease. With cholesterol, there’s no warning sign. You don’t feel it, but it could lead to a heart attack and hit you out of nowhere. Jay Leno has teamed up with Amgen on Cholesterol 911, a national campaign that is aiming to raise awareness of and sound the alarm on high LDL-C, also known as “bad” cholesterol and its link to heart attack and stroke. Jay is speaking publicly for the first time about his high LDL and urging patients with high bad cholesterol who are at increased risk for a heart attack or stroke to see the emergency in high bad cholesterol and to visit Cholesterol911.com to learn more about their risks and how to talk to their doctor about new treatment options. Listen as Jay joins Dr. Friedman to discuss more about the campaign and share his own efforts to lower his LDL-C. The two also chat about cars, Last Man Standing, The Tonight Show, Rodney Dangerfield and more.

 Encore Episode: Discipline: Improving Behavior without Spanking | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

When your child acts up, work to improve behavior without spanking.Parenting can test your patience, especially when your child misbehaves. The American Academy of Pediatrics advises against the use of spanking as a disciplinary tool. Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30% - sponsor Spanking or physical discipline can have long-lasting effects, increasing aggression in children. It doesn’t teach responsibility or self control, particularly when parents lose control to administer the spankings. Discipline That Works Model good behavior. Show how to be calm and respectful of others. Let them know expectations beforehand so they know the rules of the game. Explain how you expect them to behave in the store or at a restaurant before you even go out. Time-outs work best for kids two to five years old. Give one minute per year of age for them to think about what happened and remove them from the troublesome situation. Praise your child for good behavior. Natural consequences work well. “If you throw your snack onto the floor, it goes into the trash.” Use non-optimum behavior you see as a teaching opportunity. Listen as Dr. Jennifer Shu joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss how to help your child curb behavioral issues without spanking. Sponsor: Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30%

 EP 935 News of the Week | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Every week, Dr. Roizen discusses the latest health headlines YOU need to know.In this episode, Dr. Roizen talks about the latest health headlines that YOU need to know. Half of childhood cancers go undiagnosed. Long work weeks may be depressing, especially for women. Prenatal multi-vitamins have multiple benefits, including preventing childhood cancers. Why some kids with eczema develop food allergies (and how you can prevent them). What you eat does make a difference. The FDA is using AI to ensure the safety of food imported to the U.S. Chemicals in e-cigarettes could harm your respiratory tract.  A more severe strain of flu has been spreading across the U.S. this past month. Plus so much MORE... Bonus! Reasons Why You Need to Be Honest With Your Doctor

 EP 935B - How You Can Give the Gift of Life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Learn how The Gift of Life Marrow Registry dramatically cuts transplant wait times for critically ill people and how you can become a potential donor.When Jay Feinberg was diagnosed with leukemia in his 20s, he needed a bone marrow transplant to survive. After learning that none of his family members were good matches, his doctor searched a donor registry. Still, he found no matches. Even though his doctor told him to start preparing a bucket list, Feinberg knew there had to be a better way to find an appropriate donor. Together with his friends, he tirelessly searched for matches, organizing 250 donation drives and testing 60,000 potential donors. They finally found a match—and 23 years later, Feinberg is still cancer-free. This lengthy process inspired Feinberg to found The Gift of Life Marrow Registry. Tune in to learn more about this organization, like how it dramatically cuts transplant wait times for critically ill people and how you can become a potential donor. Bonus Why Men Should Ditch the Dad Bod

 Encore Episode: Enduring Difficult & Toxic People | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Find out how to endure difficult and toxic people in time for the holidays.It’s not uncommon to have at least one person in your life who stresses you out. Holidays can force interactions with toxic family members. First, don’t take their toxicity personally. It’s often not about you. They may misdirect upset from other aspects of their own lives. You don’t have to have this person in your life regularly. If you are upset with someone, acknowledge the different viewpoint. “Interesting point-of-view; I have this point-of-view.” Unexpressed to the source of stress, this can help you handle their opinions. Repeat to yourself until you don’t feel as charged up about it. Additionally, you can be a kind and caring person without a toxic person in your life. It is a kindness to let them go. Be good to yourself and live your life without this person as a regular participant in it. Listen as Doris Schachenhofer joins Melanie Cole, MS, to share how you can interact with toxic individuals... or not.

 Feeding You Lies: How to Unravel the Food Industry's Playbook and Reclaim Your Health | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

In her book, Feeding You Lies, Vani Hari, aka The Food Babe, blows the lid off the lies we've been fed about the food we eat.All the contradictory information we receive in terms of diet and nutrition makes it almost impossible to know what we should (and should not) be eating. Worse, just like the tobacco industry lied to us about the dangers of cigarettes, the same untruths, cover-ups, and deceptive practices are occurring in the food industry. In her book, Feeding You Lies: How to Unravel the Food Industry's Playbook and Reclaim Your Health, Vani Hari, aka The Food Babe, blows the lid off the lies we've been fed about the food we eat--lies about its nutrient value, effects on our health, label information, and even the very science we base our food choices on. A blueprint for living your life without preservatives, artificial sweeteners, additives, food dyes, or fillers, and guide to eating foods that truly nourish you and support your health, Feeding You Lies is the first step on a new path of truth in eating--and a journey to your best health ever. Listen as Vani joins Dr. Friedman to share insights from the book and clear the confusion on what to eat.

 Encore Episode: Respiratory Syncytial Virus | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Learn more about respiratory syncytial virus.Every parent worries when their children get sick. Many children get respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) at least once before age two. Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30% - sponsor RSV pops up mostly from late fall to early spring. It presents as cold-like symptoms with sneezing, runny nose and coughing. It can cause pneumonia or other bronchial difficulties. Early symptoms aren’t worrisome, because they mimic the common cold. If the child has respiratory distress on the third or fourth day (fast breathing, grunting, nodding head to breathe, whistling on exhalation), contact your pediatrician right away. If your child is blue, gray or has stopped breathing, contact emergency services. Antibiotics do not treat viruses. Steroids won’t help. Supportive care is the only treatment. Stay in contact with your pediatrician. Fluids, cold-mist humidifiers, and saline nasal rinse can ease the symptoms. Listen as Dr. Candice Jones joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss how to manage RSV. Sponsor: Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30%

 EP 934 News of the Week | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Every week, Dr. Roizen discusses the latest health headlines YOU need to know.In this episode, Dr. Roizen talks about the latest health headlines that YOU need to know. Scientists uncover how high-fat diets drive colorectal cancer growth (and why that might be contributing to the dramatic rise of colorectal cancer in millennials). Why does getting enough sleep reduce cardiovascular disease risk? It relates to a hormone that plays an unexpected role in both sleep and white blood cell production. Is it bad to sleep with wet hair? Dr. Roizen separates myth from truth. Also, why it's important to get a new pillow frequently.  The FDA says using young people's blood to prevent aging has no proven clinical benefit. Can eating dessert be good for your diet? Don't believe it! Teens say depression and anxiety are major issues among their peers. Mad cow disease and the equivalent in deer and elk can be extremely dangerous. Plus so much MORE... Bonus! Should I Take Supplements to Strengthen My Bones?

 EP 934B - An Innovative Way to Treat Prostate Cancer | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Advances in treatment can help make prostate cancer curable and survivable.Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer for men in the United States. About one in nine will be diagnosed during his lifetime. Thankfully, advances in treatment can help make this disease curable and survivable. Dr. Jonathan Haas discusses the CyberKnife—robotic technology that delivers highly targeted beams of radiation to tumors, while sparing healthy tissue. It's so precise that it can track your body's movement when you breathe and adjust the beams to stay focused on the tumor. This gives hope to patients with tumors that were previously thought to be inoperable due to damaging side effects from conventional radiation. Tune in to learn more about who can benefit from this life-saving treatment. Bonus How Interval Training Can Lower Your RealAge

 Leaving Your Abuser | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Find out why warming up and cooling down are so important.Warming up and cooling down are both important parts of any workout. People want to get to the meat of the workout, skipping these necessary parts. The warmup gets the muscles warm and pliable, making them ready for a complete workout. It also helps focus the mind on the work that’s to come. Blood flow is increased to the muscles and other parts of the body.  Tailor the warmup to the activity you’re about to undertake. Do the warmup close to the time you’ll be engaging in the activity so your body doesn’t cool off before you begin. The cooldown helps your heart settle down. It gives the lactic acid from the workout a chance to clear out a bit. If your head is above your heart during the main workout, the blood is pushed to the lower body. Cooling down allows the blood to return to other parts of the body, reducing lightheadedness after exercise. Listen as Dr. Brian Parr joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss the importance of warming up and cooling down.

 The Care Partner Perspective of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, with Actor Scott Foley | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Celebrated actor Scott Foley discusses the Not My Watch movement and how its helping women suffering from recurrent ovarian cancer.Scott Foley is a celebrated TV and film star, most known for his appearance on shows like Scandal, Felicity, and the new ABC show, Whiskey Cavalier.  What many do not know is that one of Scott’s biggest roles happened off-screen and at an early age, when he acted as a secondary caregiver to his mother during her time with recurrent ovarian cancer. Scott helped his mom through multiple recurrences for four years before losing her to the devastating disease when he was 15. At the time, treatment options were limited and much time was spent watching and waiting for the cancer to come back. Now, women with recurrent ovarian cancer, who have responded to platinum-based chemotherapy, have options called maintenance therapies that can extend their time in response and delay recurrence. Still nearly 50% of eligible women are not receiving or not aware of these options. To help get the word out, Scott has partnered with TESARO, an oncology-focused bio-pharmaceutical company, on "Not on My Watch," a nationwide movement that seeks to inform and empower women with recurrent ovarian cancer and their care partners to take proactive steps in managing the disease, like talking to their healthcare provider about maintenance therapy. As part of the Not on My Watch movement, Scott stars in an educational Public Service Announcement that reveals, for the first time, his very personal story. Listen as Scott joins Dr. Friedman to share more information about the movement. Watch Scott's PSA HERE

 Encore Episode: Flu Vaccine for 2018-2019 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Do you really need to get the flu vaccine for your family this season?Influenza or “the flu” is a virus that is often spread during winter months. It can be very dangerous and varies from year to year. Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30% - sponsor While it typically peaks in January, it can be burdensome throughout the flu season. One hundred eighty children passed away last year from influenza-related infections. Kids tend to spread the infection more than others because they play, drool, and interact with others constantly. Children under age five and the elderly are at higher risk for dangerous infections from flu. The flu shot tends to decrease the severity of the flu if one contracts it. This year’s flu vaccine has three or four strains of the virus, based on the most prevalent strains anticipated for the continent. Anyone over six months of age can get a flu shot. Pregnant moms benefit from immunization. It’s safer to get a flu shot than try to outsmart it because you may not feel the symptoms as soon as you contract it. It’s best to get it before Halloween. Listen as Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson joins Melanie Cole, MS to share all you need to know about this flu season. Sponsor: Fight colds and flu with Hydralyte. Rapid and complete hydration, suitable for all ages and doctor recommended. Use code “hydrakid” to save 30%

 EP 933 News of the Week | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Every week, Dr. Roizen discusses the latest health headlines YOU need to know.In this episode, Dr. Roizen talks about the latest health headlines that YOU need to know. What inflammation means for your brain health in the long-term. Unless you voluntarily provide weight loss and other health information to your company, they cannot ask for it. Common myths about hangovers. Smoking among teens has stopped declining, thanks to vaping. Depression affects one in seven new moms. What to look out for. Diet sodas and juices linked to higher stroke risks (but are they really?). Gut bacteria around the world. More car crashes tied to drivers high on opioids.  Plus so much MORE... Bonus! Revamp Your Relationship with Food Through Mindful Eating

 EP 933B - The Best and Worst Foods for Your Brain | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

You can help reduce your risk of memory loss by making a few tweaks to your diet and lifestyle.What's the top cause of memory loss? Age? Genetics? According to Dr. Steven Masley, author of The Better Brain Solution: How to Sharpen Cognitive Function and Prevent Memory Loss at Any Age, the number-one reason for decreased cognitive performance is actually insulin resistance. Thankfully, you can help reduce your risk by making a few tweaks to your diet and lifestyle. Dr. Masley reveals the brain toxin, nitrosamine, that's lurking in your favorite foods and how the Mediterranean diet can help you avoid it. Plus, learn the neurological dangers of eating too many refined carbs and sugars, and discover some healthy foods you should eat instead. Bonus Alcohol and Cancer: What's the Connection?

 Why and How: Warm Up and Cool Down | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Find out why warming up and cooling down are so important.Warming up and cooling down are both important parts of any workout. People want to get to the meat of the workout, skipping these necessary parts. The warmup gets the muscles warm and pliable, making them ready for a complete workout. It also helps focus the mind on the work that’s to come. Blood flow is increased to the muscles and other parts of the body.  Tailor the warmup to the activity you’re about to undertake. Do the warmup close to the time you’ll be engaging in the activity so your body doesn’t cool off before you begin. The cooldown helps your heart settle down. It gives the lactic acid from the workout a chance to clear out a bit. If your head is above your heart during the main workout, the blood is pushed to the lower body. Cooling down allows the blood to return to other parts of the body, reducing lightheadedness after exercise. Listen as Dr. Brian Parr joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss the importance of warming up and cooling down.

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