ADC podcast show

ADC podcast

Summary: Our podcasts cover a range of child health issues from the Archives of Disease suite of journals including Fetal & Neonatal and Education & Practice. The podcasts are a regular rotation of editor highlights, coverage of specific articles, as well as interviews with authors and specialists. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Podcasts:

 Our commonest breathing difficulties. Archimedes March 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 11:35

How do we know when something it good enough? Close enough that we can use product A instead of product B? Well, that’s the issue we’ve addressed in our methods chat this month (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/3/304.2) We’ve also looked at what used to be the things that sprang to mind with breathing difficulties; bronchiolitis and asthma. For bronchs - what dose of high flow oxygen (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/3/304.1)? For asthma - could macrolides save the day (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/3/306)? Have a listen, comment, subscribe, review us and let us know how lovely we are via all our social media. Will will appreciate it lots.

 Covid-19 - prevention and control of coronavirus in newborn infants | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 18:49

Jonathan Davis talks to Professor Yuan Shi - Department of Neonatology, Chongqing Medical University Affiliated Children's Hospital, China, who recently published recommendations for pregnant and new born babies in suspected infection with Covid-19. They also discuss what signs to look out for in patients. Read the letter on the on the ADC website (https://fn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/03/04/archdischild-2020-318996). It was accepted on February 20, 2020 and first published March 4, 2020.

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC April 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 13:35

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown and Rachel Agbeko bring you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the April 2020 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/105/4/i

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC March 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 8:05

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the March 2020 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/105/3/i

 When neonates and the unspoken collide. Archimedes February 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:12

The delight we all have in neonates spills over this issue, where we tackle the thorny issues of QTc prolongation with domperidone (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/2/202) and how best to manage the concerns of a midwife over an raised cord blood lactate (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/2/200.1). Sadly, how to remember how to calculate QTc or work in a constructive interprofessional manner aren’t all cleared up. We also consider what isn’t being said when people write (https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/2/200.2) with a focus on clinical research reports. Have a listen, comment, subscribe, review us and let us know how lovely we are via all our social media. Will will appreciate it lots.

 Tiny numbers, tiny things, and knowing when something hasn’t changed though it looks like it has. | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 14:19

Later than usual, this is the podcast about the Archimedes of the December 2019 issue. Children seem to throw up because they are poorly, or because they are excited, or because they are hot, or because they had too many fizzy sweeties, or because they know you’ve just had the car cleaned. So how do we manage a child who’s had a little head bump and has thrown up once? Find out in this podcast (and read more here: https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/12/1231) You can also discover if slow and steady is better than quick and often, at least when it comes to vancomycin dosing and tiny people (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/12/1229.1 ). The answer’s obvious, of course, but .. well. Both could ‘obviously’ be correct, couldn’t they? And we also talk about how to know if two things which seems to have changed are really the same from a different viewpoint, sort of. Well, it’s a tricky idea but one which is worth getting to understand (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/12/1229.2 ) When you’ve listened, please comment, and make sure you subscribe, review us and let us know how lovely we are via all our social media. Will will appreciate it lots.

 Racial disparities in preterm birth | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 37:04

The infant mortality rate in USA exceeds that of most other developed nations, ranking 26th among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. This ADC Spotlight podcast is about inequity and health. Professor Heather Burris is the first author of the paper “Racial disparities in preterm birth in the US; a biosensor of physical and social environmental exposures” (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/10/931). Professor Richard David is the author of the accompanying editorial “Inequity at Birth and Population Health” (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/10/929). Both can be found in the October edition of Archives of Disease in Childhood and on our website at adc.bmj.com.

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC February 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 13:39

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown and Senior Editor Rachel Agbeko bring you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the February 2020 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/2/i

 Brain tumour MRIs - children and parents’ views | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 17:07

MRI is essential to the clinical management of children and young people with brain tumours and it is common practice to show these to patients and families, but how they emotionally respond to seeing brain tumour imaging? Rachel Agbeko explores the qualitative study "Patients’ and parents’ views on brain tumour MRIs" with the leading author of the paper Natalie Tyldesley-Marshall (Research fellow at the Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, UK) and Dr Gail Halliday, Consultant in Paediatric Oncology, Great North Children’s Hospital, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. You can read the paper FREE for a month: https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2019/08/07/archdischild-2019-317306

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC January 2020 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 6:50

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the January 2020 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: https://adc.bmj.com/content/105/1/i

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC December 2019 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 7:18

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the December 2019 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/104/12/i

 Big events and the problems of predictions. Archimedes November 2019 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 14:22

This month brings big decisions and how to make them in our critical appraisal note (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/11/1114.2) and this flows seamlessly into the questions too... almost like there’s some planning involved. We’re asking if prenatal echo can tell us who will need emergency atrial septostomies to make birth as safe to home as close to home a reality (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/11/1114.1.abstract), and if apparently asymptomatic babies and children with malrotation really need and operation to untwirl their guts (https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/11/1116). If these get you excited to write your own story, head on over to the instructions to authors and find out how https://adc.bmj.com/pages/authors/#archimedes Don’t forget to like, subscribe, review us and let us know how lovely we are via all our social media too (please).

 An additional vote for parents? Giving children a voice | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 25:31

What if children could vote earlier? And before that, could they make themselves heard by entrusting their parents with their vote? Professor Neena Modi (Imperial College London, UK) says ‘yes’ and ‘yes’. Listen to the thought-provoking conversation with ADC’s Senior Editor Rachel Agbeko. The two paediatricians discuss the evidence behind these proposals and the role of doctors in the process of giving children a voice. Read the related paper on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website (free for a month): https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2019/05/16/archdischild-2018-316523. There’s also a letter on this topic. “Age of consent?” is co-authored by a young person, Joseph Brown, as well as co-peer-reviewed by young people: https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/17/archdischild-2019-318106.

 Atoms: the highlights from the ADC November 2019 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5:40

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the November 2019 issue. Read it on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/104/11/i

 Neonates aren’t little children, and children are sometimes little adults. Archimedes October 2019 | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 13:52

Does bronchiectasis trouble you at night? Or during the day? Or the weekends? Would you like to brush up on the best evidence to treat and prevent exacerbations? Pop onto this podcast or read more here https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2019/07/20/archdischild-2019-317562 You’ll I’m sure be wondering about how much you can extrapolate from the adult data into the kids, and this short appraisal note on our blog might help you https://blogs.bmj.com/adc/2019/08/22/neonates-are-not-tiny-children/ Bearing that in mind, the use of coffee to keep bronchi-babes out of the ICU will be of great interest to the student of EBM. So … you can swig in the summary we have here on how good it seems to be: https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2019/07/20/archdischild-2019-317668 Don’t forget to like, subscribe, review us and let us know how lovely we are via all our social media too.

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