The British History Podcast show

The British History Podcast

Summary: The BHP is a chronological retelling of the history of Britain with a particular focus upon the lives of the people. You won't find a dry recounting of dates and battles here, but instead you'll learn about who these people were and how their desires, fears, and flaws shaped the histories of England, Scotland, and Wales. iTunes is restricting our list to 300 episodes for some reason. To access all episodes, click subscribe. Support the Show

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  • Artist: Jamie Jeffers
  • Copyright: Copyright © 2011 The British History Podcast, Inc. All rights reserved.

Podcasts:

 15 – Hadrian’s Wall | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 41:08

Phew! This one is done. It was a bit of a doozy, and is also on the long side, which is why it took me a bit to get it put together. So here's the 15th episode. Beware the Ides of the Podcast!

 15 – Hadrian’s Wall | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 41:08

Have you ever wanted to know about Hadrian’s Wall? Have you ever wondered what life was like there, how it was constructed, or even just the basic question of “what exactly is Hadrian’s Wall?” Then this is the podcast for you! (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 14 – The Mystery of the Ninth Legion | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 43:07

Ok, I'll be the first to admit this one is a little confusing. After all, the whole mystery is more than a little confusing. So here is a list of the bits of evidence we're talking about. - The Ninth was nearly destroyed in a night assault by the Caledonians during Agricola's northern campaign. - The last known battle the Ninth was in was Mons Graupius. - 108 AD, The Ninth built a gate at Eboracum (York). - Post 117 AD (probably 119 to 121) there was a major rebellion in Britannia. - 80's AD or 121 AD, there were tiles at Nijmegen (Holland) stamped by the Ninth. - Tiles similar to those were also found at Carlisle. - A tombstone at Ferentinum references an emergency in Britannia that required 3,000 reinforcements. - 122 AD, Hadrian traveled to Britannia to "correct many faults" and he brought with him the Sixth Legion. - The Sixth legion took the post of Eboracum, which was the Ninth's post. No mention is made of where the Ninth went. - 142 AD, Governor Carus, who served with the Ninth, became the Governor of Arabia. - Frontinus writes to Emperor Aurelius reminding him how his grandfather (Hadrian) suffered a major loss of troops to the Jews and the Britons. - 162 AD, the Aurelian columns don't list the Ninth or Twenty Second legions. - The Twenty Second probably served in the Jewish wars and the Ninth was stationed in Britannia. That should just about cover it. Oh, and The Eagle is not a good film.

 14 – The Mystery of the Ninth Legion | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 43:07

Ok, I'll be the first to admit this one is a little confusing. After all, the whole mystery is more than a little confusing. So here is a list of the bits of evidence we're talking about. * The Ninth was nearly destroyed in a night assault by the Caledonians during Agricola's northern campaign. * The last known battle the Ninth was in was Mons Graupius. * 108 AD, The Ninth built a gate at Eboracum (York). * Post 117 AD (probably 119 to 121) there was a major rebellion in Britannia. * 80's AD or 121 AD, there were tiles at Nijmegen (Holland) stamped by the Ninth. * Tiles similar to those were also found at Carlisle. * A tombstone at Ferentinum references an emergency in Britannia that required 3,000 reinforcements. * 122 AD, Hadrian traveled to Britannia to "correct many faults" and he brought with him the Sixth Legion. * The Sixth legion took the post of Eboracum, which was the Ninth's post. No mention is made of where the Ninth went. * 142 AD, Governor Carus, who served with the Ninth, became the Governor of Arabia. * Frontinus writes to Emperor Aurelius reminding him how his grandfather (Hadrian) suffered a major loss of troops to the Jews and the Britons. * 162 AD, the Aurelian columns don't list the Ninth or Twenty Second legions. * The Twenty Second probably served in the Jewish wars and the Ninth was stationed in Britannia. That should just about cover it. Oh, and The Eagle is not a good film. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 14 – The Mystery of the Ninth Legion | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 43:07

Ok, I’ll be the first to admit this one is a little confusing. After all, the whole mystery is more than a little confusing. So here is a list of the bits of evidence we’re talking about. * The Ninth was nearly destroyed in a night assault by the Caledonians during Agricola’s northern campaign. * The last known battle the Ninth was in was Mons Graupius. * 108 AD, The Ninth built a gate at Eboracum (York). * Post 117 AD (probably 119 to 121) there was a major rebellion in Britannia. * 80’s AD or 121 AD, there were tiles at Nijmegen (Holland) stamped by the Ninth. * Tiles similar to those were also found at Carlisle. * A tombstone at Ferentinum references an emergency in Britannia that required 3,000 reinforcements. * 122 AD, Hadrian traveled to Britannia to “correct many faults” and he brought with him the Sixth Legion. * The Sixth legion took the post of Eboracum, which was the Ninth’s post. No mention is made of where the Ninth went. * 142 AD, Governor Carus, who served with the Ninth, became the Governor of Arabia. * Frontinus writes to Emperor Aurelius reminding him how his grandfather (Hadrian) suffered a major loss of troops to the Jews and the Britons. * 162 AD, the Aurelian columns don’t list the Ninth or Twenty Second legions. * The Twenty Second probably served in the Jewish wars and the Ninth was stationed in Britannia. That should just about cover it. Oh, and The Eagle is not a good film. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 13 – Agricola | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:43

We're going to talk about the governorship of Agricola, the Scots, the Irish, and I'm going to say "isthmus" an unreasonable number of times! Here's a map of Agricola's advance. HOWEVER the dates listed are the later of the two dates I mention in the podcast. Many historians think that these dates should be one year earlier. (That will make more sense to you after you listen to the podcast). NOTE: I made a comment that the legions raided on their way to Eboracum in the podcast. I meant to say that they raided once they got PAST Eboracum. Eboracum and Deva were, of course, Roman towns. At least they were at this point in time. So I think it's safe to assume they didn't raid their own people.

 13 – Agricola | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:43

We're going to talk about the governorship of Agricola, the Scots, the Irish, and I'm going to say "isthmus" an unreasonable number of times! Here's a map of Agricola's advance. HOWEVER the dates listed are the later of the two dates I mention in the podcast. Many historians think that these dates should be one year earlier. (That will make more sense to you after you listen to the podcast). NOTE: I made a comment that the legions raided on their way to Eboracum in the podcast. I meant to say that they raided once they got PAST Eboracum. Eboracum and Deva were, of course, Roman towns. At least they were at this point in time. So I think it's safe to assume they didn't raid their own people. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 13 – Agricola | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:43

We’re going to talk about the governorship of Agricola, the Scots, the Irish, and I’m going to say “isthmus” an unreasonable number of times! Here’s a map of Agricola’s advance. HOWEVER the dates listed are the later of the two dates I mention in the podcast. Many historians think that these dates should be one year earlier. (That will make more sense to you after you listen to the podcast). NOTE: I made a comment that the legions raided on their way to Eboracum in the podcast. I meant to say that they raided once they got PAST Eboracum. Eboracum and Deva were, of course, Roman towns. At least they were at this point in time. So I think it’s safe to assume they didn’t raid their own people. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 12 – The Road to the North | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 22:59

I'm back! I was delayed due to my computer kindly self-destructing last week. So for this episode we'll be talking about how awful life under Roman Rule was in the first century, the year of the four emperors, and the events that lead up to Agricola. If you're a fan on the podcast, please click the "Show your support" button on the website and become a member! Membership is cheap ($2.99 a month), it can be cancelled any time, and it will really help me out! So if you can spare $2.99 a month, please consider it. Thanks!

 12 – The Road to the North | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 22:59

70 CE to 78 CE. This episode we’ll be talking about how awful life under Roman Rule was in the first century, the year of the four emperors, and the events that lead up to Agricola. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 12 – The Road to the North | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 22:59

70 CE to 78 CE. This episode we'll be talking about how awful life under Roman Rule was in the first century, the year of the four emperors, and the events that lead up to Agricola. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, History of Scotland, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 11 – Boudica’s Rebellion, Part Two | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 29:34

Here's the exciting conclusion of Boudica's Rebellion. Additionally, as a side note, I have rerecorded the first 4 podcasts (the Introduction episode through Island Part Two) and I hope to rerecord Part 3 sometime soon. So they should have significantly better sound quality etc! Enjoy!

 11 – Boudica’s Rebellion, Part Two | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 32:21

60 CE Having burned several cities to the ground, Boudica and her army of enraged Britons are a seemingly unstoppable force. However, Governor Suetonius has returned from the West, and has marshalled his forces. It was a conflict is so famous that even Tacitus wrote of it… and only one general would come out on top. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 11 – Boudica’s Rebellion, Part Two | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 32:21

60 CE Having burned several cities to the ground, Boudica and her army of enraged Britons are a seemingly unstoppable force. However, Governor Suetonius has returned from the West, and has marshalled his forces. It was a conflict is so famous that even Tacitus wrote of it... and only one general would come out on top. (History of Britain, History of England, History of Wales, Celtic History, Roman History) Support the Show

 10 – Boudica’s Rebellion, Part One | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 31:28

This episode focuses upon the year 60 and the story of Boudica, queen of the Iceni. The year was 1907. A young boy swimming in the river Alde spotted something shiny in the water. What he found was the bronze head that clearly had been hacked from the body a statue. He took it home, painted it white, and placed it in his garden. My American listeners likely have their heads spinning upon hearing this, but occurrences like the bronze head in the garden aren’t exactly uncommon. For example, the guy who found Seahenge had earlier found an axe that was thousands of years old and he just kept it on his mantle for a while. Anyway, so the head was kept in the garden... until it was recognized as an artifact by some local experts and it was determined that it was the head of the Roman Emperor Claudius from the first century AD. He ended up selling it for five shillings. …

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