US News | Science Discoveries show

US News | Science Discoveries

Summary: Get the latest science news about the environment, genetics, animals, technology, archaeology and space.

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  • Artist: US News & World Report
  • Copyright: Copyright ℗ U.S. News & World Report, L.P. All rights reserved.

Podcasts:

 Flextronics | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at Cornell University and the University of Melbourne, Australia, are fabricating organic semiconducting materials from a gentle solvent called Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

 High Life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

A University of Colorado at Boulder research team has determined that gases rising from deep within the Earth, fuel the world's highest known microbial ecosystems, which were detected near the rim of the Socompa volcano in the Andes.

 Global Worming | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Two researchers at Brigham Young University are studying the impacts of global warming on Antartica's ecosystem by looking at the relationship between rising temperatures and a specialized worm that makes its own antifreeze.

 Quantum Leap | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Scientists at the Universities of Maryland and Michigan along with those at the Joint Quantum Institute have, for the first time ever, sucessfully teleported information between two atoms at a distance of one meter.

 Food Plight | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

New research conducted by the Univeristy of Washington and Stanford University shows that a rapidly warming climate is likely to seriously damage crop production within the tropics and subtropics by the end of this century.

 Plasticity | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

A research team at the University of Wisconsin at Madison has uncovered what makes plastics so malleable. Molecules that make up plastics can rearrange themselves up to 1,000 times faster while under stress, giving them the ability to flow or bend.

 Swat Team | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at the University of Central Florida are teaming up with the Virtual Reality Medical Center to immerse stroke survivors in a virtual game-world that is full of flying insects with the goal of expanding the survivors' range of movement.

 Bac-Tery Powered | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities are studying a remarkable species of becteria that produces electric current when attached to a graphite electrode or other conductive surface.

 Shrinky Dinghies | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

A research team at Penn State University has used chemicals to create nano-motors that drive nanoparticles from one location to another.

 Gear Head | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at Purdue University and The Catholic University of America have proposed a new mechanism for how the motor inside of a virus works in order to propel the virus from one location to another.

 Gender Render | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

A professor at Brown University has determined that men's faces tend to have a more reddish skin tone, while a greenish facial skin tone is more common for women.

 "Tool Time" | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Georgetown University researcher studies subset of bottlenose dolphin that uses marine sponges as a tool to hunt for food.

 "Bac-Tery Powered" | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities are studying a remarkable species of becteria that produces electric current when attached to a graphite electrode or other conductive surface.

 "Swat Team" | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1:30

Researchers at the University of Central Florida are teaming up with the Virtual Reality Medical Center to immerse stroke survivors in a virtual game-world that is full of flying insects with the goal of expanding the survivors' range of movement.

 "Ruly Bully" | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: Unknown

Brain scans of young, aggressive bullies suggest they may actually enjoy seeing others in pain, according to a new University of Chicago study.

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