TED Talks Education show

TED Talks Education

Summary: What should future schools look like? How do brains learn? Some of the world's greatest educators, researchers, and community leaders share their stories and visions onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.

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Podcasts:

 The tragedy of orphanages | Georgette Mulheir | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:10:41

Orphanages are costly and can cause irreparable damage both mentally and physically for its charges -- so why are they still so ubiquitous? Georgette Mulheir gravely describes the tragedy of orphanages and urges us to end our reliance on them, by finding alternate ways of supporting children in need.

 What I've learned from my autistic brothers | Faith Jegede Cole | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:05:20

Faith Jegede tells the moving and funny story of growing up with her two brothers, both autistic -- and both extraordinary. In this talk from the TED Talent Search, she reminds us to pursue a life beyond what is normal.

 Talk nerdy to me | Melissa Marshall | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:04:34

Melissa Marshall brings a message to all scientists (from non-scientists): We're fascinated by what you're doing. So tell us about it -- in a way we can understand. In just 4 minutes, she shares powerful tips on presenting complex scientific ideas to a general audience.

 The self-organizing computer course | Shimon Schocken | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:16:25

Shimon Schocken and Noam Nisan developed a curriculum for their students to build a computer, piece by piece. When they put the course online -- giving away the tools, simulators, chip specifications and other building blocks -- they were surprised that thousands jumped at the opportunity to learn, working independently as well as organizing their own classes in the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). A call to forget about grades and tap into the self-motivation to learn.

 How we can eat our landscapes | Pam Warhurst | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:13:21

What should a community do with its unused land? Plant food, of course. With energy and humor, Pam Warhurst tells at the TEDSalon the story of how she and a growing team of volunteers came together to turn plots of unused land into communal vegetable gardens, and to change the narrative of food in their community.

 What we're learning from online education | Daphne Koller | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:20:40

Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free -- not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

 A teacher growing green in the South Bronx | Stephen Ritz | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:13:59

A whirlwind of energy and ideas, Stephen Ritz is a teacher in New York's tough South Bronx, where he and his kids grow lush gardens for food, greenery -- and jobs. Just try to keep up with this New York treasure as he spins through the many, many ways there are to grow hope in a neighborhood many have written off, or in your own.

 Every city needs healthy honey bees | Noah Wilson-Rich | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:12:43

Bees have been rapidly and mysteriously disappearing from rural areas, with grave implications for agriculture. But bees seem to flourish in urban environments -- and cities need their help, too. Noah Wilson-Rich suggests that urban beekeeping might play a role in revitalizing both a city and a species.

 Reinventing the encyclopedia game | Rives | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:10:46

Prompted by the Encyclopaedia Britannica ending its print publication, performance poet Rives resurrects a game from his childhood. Speaking at the TEDxSummit in Doha, Rives takes us on a charming tour through random (and less random) bits of human knowledge: from Chimborazo, the farthest point from the center of the Earth, to Ham the Astrochimp, the first chimpanzee in outer space.

 The 100,000-student classroom | Peter Norvig | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:06:11

In the fall of 2011 Peter Norvig taught a class with Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence at Stanford attended by 175 students in situ -- and over 100,000 via an interactive webcast. He shares what he learned about teaching to a global classroom.

 The electric rise and fall of Nikola Tesla | Marco Tempest | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:06:05

Combining projection mapping and a pop-up book, Marco Tempest tells the visually arresting story of Nikola Tesla -- called "the greatest geek who ever lived" -- from his triumphant invention of alternating current to his penniless last days.

 Archaeology from space | Sarah Parcak | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:05:20

In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of "space archaeology" -- using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations.

 Why is 'x' the unknown? | Terry Moore | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:03:57

Why is 'x' the symbol for an unknown? In this short and funny talk, Terry Moore gives the surprising answer.

 What's left to explore? | Nathan Wolfe | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:07:10

We've been to the moon, we've mapped the continents, we've even been to the deepest point in the ocean -- twice. What's left for the next generation to explore? Biologist and explorer Nathan Wolfe suggests this answer: Almost everything. And we can start, he says, with the world of the unseeably small.

 Feats of memory anyone can do | Joshua Foer | File Type: video/mp4 | Duration: 00:20:28

There are people who can quickly memorize lists of thousands of numbers, the order of all the cards in a deck (or ten!), and much more. Science writer Joshua Foer describes the technique -- called the memory palace -- and shows off its most remarkable feature: anyone can learn how to use it, including him.

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