A Voice from the Isles show

A Voice from the Isles

Summary: Listen to the weekly sermons and other recorded lectures of Fr. Gregory and stay connected to the Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.

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  • Artist: Fr. Gregory Hallam and Ancient Faith Radio
  • Copyright: Fr. Gregory Hallam and Ancient Faith Ministries

Podcasts:

 A Time For Everything Under the Sun | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:15

A Time For Everything Under the Sun

 A Global and a Personal Cross | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 07:58

A Global and a Personal Cross

 Humble Followers | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 13:27
 Get out for your own good | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 21:19

Get out for your own good

 Kingdom Struggles | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 16:03

Kingdom Struggles In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. God is one. Amen. On this Meatfare Sunday we are urged by the Church not to eat meat for the next week, as we prepare ourselves for Lent that begins on Monday, the 2nd of March. The challenge is to practise self-discipline, to experience that we “eat to live,” not “live to eat.” Yet in the Gospel today from the 25th chapter of St Matthew, Jesus Christ praises those righteous people who gave Him food when he was hungry and drink when He was thirsty. The righteous are puzzled, because they have not seen Jesus Christ. However, He explains to them that when you gave food and drink to those in need, you gave that nourishment “to Me.” It appears that possibly the Gospel and the theme for Meatfare Sunday might be in conflict about what attitude to take to food. However, in fact, the Gospel and Meatfare Sunday strongly support each other, because what is being considered is not our attitude to food, but our relationship to Jesus Christ. Meatfare Sunday urges us to become more self-disciplined so that we can draw closer to Christ. The Gospel today urges us to help those in need, to seek social justice, so that we can draw closer to Christ. In brief, both Meatfare Sunday and this Gospel are urging us to draw closer to Christ. In this Gospel “the shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.” Later, in the Gospel of St John, Jesus Christ states: “I am the good shepherd; [and] the good shepherd lays down His life for the sheep.” So, why are the sheep praised so much and the goats so rejected? The correct translation of this Gospel verse is “As the shepherd separates the sheep from the young kids.” St John Chrysostom points out that “indeed from sheep great is the profit—as from the milk, as from the wool, and from the young, of all which things the young kid [does not have]” [cited by The Orthodox New Testament: The Holy Gospels, Volume 1, Holy Apostles Convent, Buena Vista, Colorado, p. 123]. To put it bluntly, the sheep have grown up and reached spiritual maturity, but the young kids have only begun their lives and are not yet spiritually mature. The division between sheep and young kids in this Gospel passage from St Matthew is linked to judgment on our lives, both God’s judgment of us and our own judgment of ourselves. Metropolitan Antony Bloom has written, and I quote, of how: “the day will come when we shall stand before God and [we will] be judged, but as long as our pilgrimage [on earth] continues, as long as we live in the process of becoming [that is, of growing closer to Christ], as long as there is ahead of us this road that leads to the full measure of the stature of Christ [that is, the importance of following Christ in our lives] which is our vocation [our calling], judgment must be [given on ourselves] by ourselves…. On [this] road [that leads to Christ] judgment is something which is happening all the time with[in] us; there is a dialogue, a … tension between [on the one hand,] our thoughts, emotions, feelings, actions and [on the other hand,] our conscience, which stands in judgment upon us…. There is a continuing dialogue with[in] us through our life,” concluded Metropolitan Antony [Meditations: A Spiritual Journey, Dimension Books, pp. 3-4]. In the reflection that Metropolitan Antony has set out, the sheep could be viewed as our consciences—our awareness of what is right—in conflict with many of “our thoughts, emotions, feelings [and] actions,” that represent the young kids. If Metropolitan Antony is right that “judgment is something which is happening all the time with[in] us”—and that is certainly an Orthodox Christian approach—then this separation between sheep and young kids is happening within us throughout our lives, as well as on the Final Day of Judgment. Essentially, we are trying now to rid ourselves of sin, through sinning less and less, as well as confessing whenever appropriate. However, we can’t rid ourselves of sin through

 True Repentance | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:20
 Simeon’s Line | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 17:57
 Being All and in All | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 19:49
 The New Life Revolution | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 15:17

The New Life Revolution

 Water of Life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 11:20
 Fugitives in a Sorrowful Land | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 19:41

Fugitives in a Sorrowful Land

 Rebirth from a Birth | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 14:32
 The King of Kings and the Prince of Peace | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 10:10

The King of Kings and the Prince of Peace

 The King of Kings and the Prince of Peace | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 10:10

The King of Kings and the Prince of Peace

 Righteousness Fulfilled | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 20:19

Righteousness Fulfilled

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