Arts Podcasts

Librivox: Road, The by Sassoon, Siegfried show

Librivox: Road, The by Sassoon, SiegfriedJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you eight different readings of Siegfried Sassoon's The Road , a weekly poetry project. (Summary by Annie Coleman)

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Librivox: Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei by Marx, Karl show

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Karl Marx und Friedrich Engels schrieben ihr Manifest im Dezember 1847, als Leitfaden fuer die grundsaetzlichen Prinzipien und Praktiken des Kommunismus. Das Manifest sagte ausserdem den Untergang des Kapitalistismus’ voraus. (Zusammenfassung von Gesine)

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Librivox: Twas the Night Before Christmas (A Visit From St. Nicholas) by Moore, Clement Clarke show

Librivox: Twas the Night Before Christmas (A Visit From St. Nicholas) by Moore, Clement ClarkeJoin Now to Follow

Librivox volunteers bring you nine different readings of Clement C. Moore's 'Twas the Night Before Christmas , a weekly poetry project. (Summary by Annie Coleman)

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Librivox: Open Library, The by Kahle, Brewster show

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Text of the speech given by Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive , at the launch of the Open Library in October 2005. LibriVox was invited to the launch, and produced audio recordings for "An International Episode," and "Old Christmas," two of the first books scanned into the Open Library collection. (Summary by Hugh)

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Librivox: Parenticide Club, The by Bierce, Ambrose show

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Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914?), best known as journalist, satirist and short story writer. Cynical in outlook, economical in style; Bierce vanished while an observer with Pancho Villa's army. Four grotesque short stories about murder within the family, seen through the gently innocent eyes of family members ... usually the murderer himself. (Summary written by Peter Yearsley)

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Librivox: Awful German Language, The by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Awful German Language, The by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

If you’ve ever studied German (and maybe even if you haven’t), you’re likely to find this short essay to be hilarious. Published as Appendix D from Twain’s 1880 book A Tramp Abroad , this comedic gem outlines the pitfalls one will encounter when trying to wrap one’s mind around the torturous German cases, adjective endings, noun genders, and verb placement. (Summary by Kara)

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Librivox: Happy Prince and Other Tales, The by Wilde, Oscar show

Librivox: Happy Prince and Other Tales, The by Wilde, OscarJoin Now to Follow

Collection of children’s stories written in 1888, dealing primarily with love and selfishness. These stories are generally sad, with a moralistic message. The collection includes: The Happy Prince, The Nightingale and the Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket. (Summary written by Joy Chan)

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Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, A by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

Come and hear the strange tail of The Boss Hank Morgan, a modern day (at the time of publication) Connecticut Yankee who inexplicably finds himself transported to the court of the legendary King Arthur (as the title of the book implies). Hank, or simply, The Boss, as he comes to be most frequently known, quickly uses his modern day knowledge and education to pass himself off as a great magician, to get himself out of all sorts of surprising, (and frequently amusing) situations, as well as to advance the technological and cultural status of the nation in which he finds himself. In the rather un-subtle sub-text of the story, Twain uses The Boss to express a surprisingly pragmatic and frequently contradictory philosophy. The Boss explores the relative merits of Democracy, and Monarchy, he expresses his views on the “Nature v. Nurture” debate, he frequently speaks forcefully against an established Church, but just as strongly advocates for religion and a variety of churches (just not a compulsory one) and he devotes at least one afternoon to introducing his companions to the concept of inflation. In a far more subtle, yet no less forceful manner, the Boss shares with the reader some views about taxation, slavery (both literal and wage slavery), trade unions, the origins of the German language, the nature of marriage, and probably most powerfully, death. It is a tall order for a relatively brief text, but Twain manages it all with surprising clarity. No one will agree fully with the Boss on all of these matters, and I would be surprised if Twain himself would. In fact the Boss’s views are so pragmatic, and often contradictory, the reader is left to wonder if Twain himself is alternately speaking through the Boss, and setting him up as a straw man. Either way it is a delightful story and a great piece of American Literature, to say nothing of an excellent argument for education. (Review written by Steve Andersen)

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Librivox: Helsinkiin by Aho, Juhani show

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The miniature novel Helsinkiin by Juhani Aho was published in 1889. A psychological novel about a young man’s stepping into adult life, it also touches the then heated language politics as Finnish was emerging as a language of academia in the bilingual country. Aho (1861 - 1921) was among the first professional writers in Finland. This reading is in Finnish. (Summary by Tuija Aalto)

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Librivox: Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure by Cleland, John show

Librivox: Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure by Cleland, JohnJoin Now to Follow

Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1749) was the first widely-read English novel in the genre “Erotica.” It was written by John Cleland as he was serving hard time at a debtor’s prison in London. Over the centuries, the novel has been repeatedly banned by authorities, assuring its preeminent role in the history of the ongoing struggle against censorship of free expression. Until Fanny Hill , previous heroines had conducted their amorous liaisons “off-stage.” Any erotic misadventures were described euphemistically. As women who had gone astray, they always repented, which made even their most outrageous dalliances somehow suitable for a moralistic readership. The protagonist of Fanny Hill , however, never repented a single moment of her sexual exploits … quite the contrary! And with Fanny, the devil is in the details, realistically described. (Summary by Denny Mike)

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